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Exhibitions

Libby Hague Pattern Recognition

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December 31, 2016 – January  22, 2017

Reception: Saturday January 7, 2-5 PM

Playdate: Sunday, January 15, 1-4 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Libby Hague. 

I see Loop Gallery as an experimental space. This exhibition has two experimental installations—one visual and the other audio visual.

How much is too much? You begin with one object, then add another. At a certain point, our minds rebel at having to hold it all together. Nevertheless you add one more thing and wondrously, a release comes, everything fuses and becomes one variegated pattern with a quiet visual buzz on which that one new addition sits, a resting spot in a noisy world.

To explore this edge of excess, I am relying on the safety net of structure; it is not a precise grid, but an intuitively felt one that I hope viewers will also sense—something to make me feel brave and viewers reassured—something to connect us to a subtly comprehensible world that allows me to build complexity.

In a spirit of free invention, I’ve also begun a series of experiments with the potential of some of the structural components to make sounds. These sounds are much simpler than those made by traditional instruments, but the objects are very curious and less daunting. Everything will flow from the viewer’s decision to reach out and touch something. When explored by careful people, it should be at least interesting. If anyone is actually musical, I hope something more will emerge.

Libby Hague, RCA, (BFA Honours, Concordia University, (SGWU) Montreal)

Thematically, Libby Hague’s work examines humane and complex social relationships in a precarious and interconnected world. Her concerns, curiosity and love of invention have led her to a hybrid practice of printmaking, installation and animation.

Her recent solo exhibitions include the Idea Exchange, Cambridge; Centre Clark, Montreal; the Art Gallery of Ontario; YYZ artist’s outlet, Toronto; and the Art Gallery of Mississauga. Recent group exhibitions include Habitat: Our World; our chance, Harbourfront; Build…build better, Zion Schoolhouse and All that glows, AGNS. She lives and works in Toronto, Canada.

For more information, please visit www.libbyhague.com or contact Kelly McKenzie, Gallery Manager.

John Ide Drawings 2B

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December 3 -23, 2016

Reception: December 3, 2-5 PM

06-2b-6

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist John Ide. 

In this new series of drawings, thousands of cross hatched lines make patterns of dark and light that rise and fall, like breath. “Everything I do to the paper changes the paper,” Ide says. “The marks themselves—some of them hold bits of the graphite, some release it. As the drawing is being built over time white lines begin appearing, as if the paper has remembered where a line was before.”

The tools are simple: 2B pencil, colour pastel, and Stonehenge paper.

The drawings are striking for a gentle but uncompromising quality, their rich texture lost in reproduction, especially online. You have to see the works in person… [to] see not just fields of dark and light, but the impressions of the layers of cross hatching that went before. 

Maria Meindl, bodylanguagejournal.wordpress.com

A wide range of sources inspire the works: a flash of flame on a wood-fired bowl, faded frayed fabrics, billowing clouds, a leaf drifting. Suggestions of screens sometimes emerge, highlighting perhaps in this age of facsimile, the dynamic forces as they play with our notions of what’s real, what’s not.

John Ide is a Toronto-based artist who has exhibited widely. Having created filmic works earlier in his career, he returned to drawing in the mid-2000s. Recent exhibitions include Time, Shadow, and Light at the Glenhyrst Art Gallery of Brant and Magritte’s Cloud at Loop Gallery.

Sheryl Dudley Field Notes

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December 3 – 23, 2016

Reception: December 3, 2-5 PM

dudley-300dpi

After several previous bodies of work that explore family history as far back as the American Civil War, Sheryl Dudley jumps forward to her own childhood in the 1950’s, U.S.A. – a time punctuated by the looming threat of the atom bomb, duck & cover exercises and fallout shelters. She expresses this period in a series of visually abstracted metaphors of a remembered state of mind.

“Field Notes” refers to a gully in a forgotten strip of land a few miles long with a stream running through – a place where summers were spent gathering materials and building forts. It grew like a shantytown and periodically workers were sent in to clear away the ‘debris’. Structures were made up of all kinds of found materials: cast-off cardboards and ‘skids’ from a dumpster behind the supermarket, or lumber and corrugated metal from nearby building sites. A stash of old storm windows found in a basement and dragged down to the gully was meant to be the castle but proved too rickety to inhabit. Another made of steel mesh stretched out into a full circle with wildflowers and tall grasses woven through the openings became the most memorable for its fragrance and filtered light.

Several decades later a shopper reaches down to pick up her bag set below a magazine rack and notices something the Indigo team has missed. A sticky substance smeared across the bottom shelf – more than likely a soft drink knocked over and abandoned. Eventually a magazine carelessly tossed down on top of the spill stuck. Two years later, only a ghost of it remains plastered to the bottom ledge – an ambiguous residue of its back cover.

Could there possibly be a subject more banal? It is what we make of things that interest the artist: a bit of trash stuck to a shelf triggers a memory. Vivid imaginings take hold and it becomes greater than a recollection by morphing into a specific time and place. And then a gang of neighborhood kids appears and they start rummaging through backyards and garbage bins for stuff for building and invention. And so, while an idea for a new project springs to mind that takes her way back in time, the final result looks nothing at all like the past. As shadows flit in the night, memory is an elusive construct, often ending up resting in an un-nameable place and time.

J. Lynn Campbell Witness

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November 5 -27, 2016

Reception: November 5, 3-6 PM

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We are all actors and witnesses in the event called our lives – each life intersecting with, being shaped by and shaping those of others.

Today, the breadth of our connections – both direct and mediated – can be overwhelming in itself. Meanwhile, reports from far and wide unrelentingly offer views of mounting conflicts, prolonged wars, political polarizations, renewed xenophobia and the juggernaut of climate-change. The cumulative impact can be simply staggering.

Is it part of the human condition: to create the very circumstances that threaten us? to feel responsible yet powerless to shape a positive shared future? Certainly,

our efforts can feel intensely inadequate.

Still, as an artist and a Canadian, J. Lynn Campbell has had many opportunities for transforming, even transcending, the life and circumstances into which she was born. And though this is a privilege little-known to many, all people can choose whether and how they will honour life and, for her, it is in the honouring itself, that beauty is found and hope revived.

The works on view in Witness are drawn from several years of a practice in which Campbell strives to bear witness to her life and the shared human desire for connection, meaning and hope.

Passage, Earthly Paradise, and excerpts from Offering bear witness to these states.

Through the conception and the making of these pieces, J. Lynn Campbell claims, interprets and layers fragments from that which matters to her when faced with the complexities of life’s shifting realities. This can be a reminder that meaning is not found but made.

J. Lynn Campbell is a Toronto-based artist who trained at the Ontario College of Art (now OCADU), with independent studies in France, Humanities at the University of Toronto, and Philosophy at York University. Her practice extends from two-dimensional collage to three-dimensional construction and site-specific installation. She has exhibited in Canada, Italy and Germany. Her work is included in private, public, and corporate collections.

Jenn Law Extant

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November 5 – 27, 2016

Reception: November 5, 3 – 6 PMlaw-extant_loop_invite-2016

An object uncopied is under perpetual siege… 

—Hillel Schwartz 

Jenn Law’s multi-disciplinary practice explores the idea of the variable copy in relation to the historical archive/library and print-based strategies of preservation. In Extant, Law considers the legacies of three celebrated authors–Virgil, Emily Dickinson, and Franz Kafka–who requested in their wills that their unfinished works and/or their correspondence be burned upon their deaths. In each case, their work was spared and has gone on to inspire countless writers and readers. Here, Law has carefully hand-crafted imagined artifacts of these authors, seemingly rescued from the flames. Partially destroyed, the works revel in their salvation while prompting the viewer to contemplate the impact of their near-absence on the history of Western literature and culture. Each lithographed artifact blurs the boundary between the real and the imagined, the faithful forgery and the illusive original. Tapping into our angst over things left undone, Law deliberates on the will of the artist, literally and figuratively, pondering the delicate tipping point between annihilation and preservation, obscurity and immortality.

Accompanying these artifacts are a series of lithographed postcards of libraries—some are creatively altered replicas of vintage postcards, while others are invented by the artist from archival sources. Collectively alluding to the lost library of Alexandria, this ongoing series is modelled on early twentieth century ‘disaster’ postcards—with a contemporary twist. In a time when the targeted destruction of artworks, archaeological treasures, and historical monuments has become a weapon in the war against humanity, the image of material culture under siege has become more urgent and potent than ever. Ultimately, the extant artifact invites us to reflect on that which has been preserved for posterity while (impossibly) imagining what is irrevocably lost over the course of time.

Jenn Law is an artist, writer, and researcher living in Toronto. Law holds a PhD in Anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, England, a BA in Anthropology from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, and a BFA from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario. She has exhibited her art internationally and has worked as a lecturer, curator, and editor in Canada, the UK, and South Africa, publishing on South African, Caribbean, and Canadian contemporary art and print culture. Law has been the recipient of several awards and grants for her research including from SSHRC, the British Council, and the British Academy. She is the co-editor, with Tara Cooper, of Printopolis, published by Open Studio, Toronto in 2016.

P. Roch Smith fields of play

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October 8th – October 30th, 2016

Reception: Thursday, October 13th, 6 – 9 PM

Q & A: Sunday, October 30th, 2 PM

improbable_act_of_suspension_detail

P. Roch Smith’s work centres on the creativity of play, equilibrium and disequilibrium, and how memories are constructed and held in place. In fields of play, Smith presents work in which the mass produced (plastic army figures) are merged with the organic (tree branches, sisal twine and yarn). The figures are unified by bronze casting – fixing their hybridity in both a metaphoric and material manner. The relational nature of value is examined as the tiny scale of the bronze figures is the antithesis of monumentality usually associated with bronze as a sculptural material. While bronze casting normally speaks to permanence and the epic, the scale of these works creates a form of intimacy.

Play has been theorized as a liminal space – occupying both the real and the imagined simultaneously. It is within this topography that Smith points to certain aspects of the human condition. We manufacture toys with the intention of enabling children to play and the assumption is that this play is free, unencumbered and not contingent. Pulling back, however, it may be argued that the inherent structure of the toy itself echoes strictly adult concerns. Toys and play easily normalize certain ideas about one’s place in the greater scheme of things. Thankfully, children have also long subverted these rigid narrative structures. The altering of toys – drawing tattoos on a doll or shaving the “life-like” hair off of a GI Joe figure – is an aspirational act and speaks to claiming new narratives.

Toys as a sculptural material intrigues Smith. He has spent years amassing a large collection of plastic toy soldiers, model sets, LEGO blocks, Playmobile figures and these toys become raw materials for creation. The alchemy arises from combining these elements in new ways – stretching their scale or altering their properties. In this way a tree branch replaces a gun. A 5-foot tall tower of LEGO serves as a platform for a figure to let down a rope. All of the army figures have some form of intervention – they are cut, melted or altered to undertake the new work and tasks that Smith sets out for them.

P. Roch Smith was born and raised on Vancouver Island and currently lives and maintains a studio in Toronto. Working primarily within the realm of sculpture, Smith also generates installations, paintings, and drawings as part of his artistic output. Smith received a BFA from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and an MFA from York University. He has taught classes at the University of Waterloo, ECIAD, and York University. He is a member of loop Gallery in Toronto and currently manages and operates the bronze and aluminum foundry at York University.

Smith has exhibited internationally and is included in private as well as public collections in Canada and the United States. His large-scale outdoor sculptures are available through the Oeno Gallery located in Prince Edward County, ON.

For more information, visit rochsmith.com, or visit his pages on instagram (@rochsmith) and twitter (@_rochsmith).

Jane LowBeer land lines

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October 8th – October 30th, 2016

Reception: Thursday, October 13th, 6 – 9 PM

Q & A: Sunday, October 30th, 2 PM

jane

It is to be had for the feeling… you can extract the essence of a place once you know how. If you just get as still as a needle you’ll be there. 

Lawrence Durell 

 

In land lines Jane LowBeer reflects on the horizon seen in the rural landscape, the rolling hills, forests and fields of southern Ontario. A first impression of these collages may suggest floating islands, strange creatures or sea-less ships. In the making they consist of overlapped monoprints, sewn and cut out in asymmetric, horizontal forms. These forms are caught and pinned on the wall like trophy fish.

But a closer look reveals something else: sanctuary, places of peace, wellsprings of lyric dreams and poems. Grass, trees, fence lines, pasture and hedge rows, LowBeer reveals the land as layers of lines constantly shifting with wind and light.

Although not using the standard material for drawing, LowBeer focuses on line as her medium of expression. With traditional drypoint technology she builds up texture with numerous printings on semi-transparent Japanese paper, collaged, overlapped and sewn together to slowly evolve into a finished, shaped work: multi-media mounted on wood.

LowBeer continues to develop the horizontal format. A previous Loop show, Crankees consisted of 60” scrolls in a box which the viewer had to operate. In Seams, her 2013 exhibition, her sewn landscapes were long. In land lines she pushes the format further.

In the countryside the horizon line is continuous, spreading in all directions. LowBeer plays with the experience of that expanse by exaggerating the proportion, squeezing some pieces to less than two inches high and stretching the length.

We are all overwhelmed in the vastness of the world. Jane’s work in landscape hopes to bring us back to the essence of place.

This is Jane’s sixth exhibition at Loop. She studied printmaking at the venerated Atelier 17 in Paris and her work has won numerous prizes. Her art is found in private and public collections in New York, Paris, Montreal and Toronto including London’s Victoria & Albert Museum and the Bibliothèque National de Paris, France. In Toronto her monotypes can be found at Open Studio and The Nikolai Rukaj Gallery. LowBeer is looking forward to an upcoming exhibition at VAC (Visual Arts Centre of Clarington) in 2018.

Kelly Cade fall ● stream ● wake

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September 10th – October 2nd, 2016

Reception – September 10th, 3 – 6 PM

Cade

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce fall stream wake, a new exhibition of works by Kelly Cade

Cade’s work explores the visceral subtext of our experience in the context of our relationship with the natural world. Her artistic process involves locating and articulating the texture of intuitive space. The abstracted photographs in fall stream wake represent a mapping of water dreams, a continuing exploration of the essential feel of subliminal impressions.

These ‘water’ dreams are inverted, unanchored, and unbound streams without a point of reference and with elements yet to be defined. They are at times expansive, other times contained. Cade immerses herself in these fluid spaces, which feel earthy, mossy, heavy, milky, clear, light– as a way of examining more closely the fabric of our experience without assigning or searching for meaning.

Kelly Cade is a visual artist working in a range of media, from painting and photography to installations. She is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design and has exhibited in both solo and group shows. Her work can be found in private and public collections throughout Canada, the United States and the U.K. Cade is currently a member of loop gallery in Toronto.

Candida Girling Shifting Landscapes

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September 10th – October 2nd, 2016

Reception:  September 10th, 3 – 6 PMGirling

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce Shifting Landscapes, a new exhibition of works by Candida Girling.

For the past several years, issues concerning the environment have been central to Girling’s work. Girling has explored the potential of enabling public space as a site for interactive installations such as musical benches and hydroponic, portable sculptural walls. She sees the potential of using art as a means of converting dead space into lively space, to be used for gathering and dreaming. In this latest exhibition at Loop Gallery, Girling demonstrates her love of drawing in a mixed media installation comprised of ink drawings, etchings in wood, and laser cut sculpture that examine the notion of the contemporary landscape. Girling suggests that the landscape of the natural world also includes the works, quandaries and the crises of humanity. Though we may wish to escape to the bucolic, the world is—as Wordsworth has said—too much with us. Candida Girling was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. She is a Canadian citizen and resident of Toronto, Ontario. Girling studied art at York University in Toronto, and at Edinburgh University / Edinburgh College of Art in Scotland, and studied Industrial Design at Ontario College of Art and Design and at the Royal Danish Academy of Architecture in Copenhagen, where she worked for Pelikan Design and the Danish Design Council. Girling received her MFA at SUNY University at Buffalo in Visual Studies/ Emerging Practice. Girling is a founding member of loop gallery and has been exhibiting her work since 2000. Recent exhibitions include: Art Fashion Show at Gallery 1313, Interactive Installations for Nuit Blanche, the Anderson Gallery in Buffalo, and Loop Gallery in Toronto. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and abroad, including Germany, England, Scotland United States, and Denmark. Girling also teaches at Sheridan College and at Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto.

Sara Shields Out of Mind

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August 13th – September 4th, 2016

Reception: August 18th, 6 – 9 PM

soulless wonder of planet zero 300 dpi 10 in

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce Out Of Mind, a new exhibition of works by guest artist, Sara Shields.

The drawings showcased in Out Of Mind have never been shown before. These works have been driven by human interaction and its influence on human emotion and actions (whether it is through everyday small-talk, elaborate storytelling, or manipulating the truth, for example), or by lack of interaction and action. Focused on the human figure, these drawings have evolved over time—as storytelling and human life continue to evolve. Lines, patterns, and organic shapes coalesce into human-alien hybrids. Always searching for an alternate human universe that lies deep within the subconscious, these drawings depict imaginative tableaus of alien-human beings void of gender and race, as feelings and actions see none of that. Personal emotions are played with and externalized, but become completely masked within each work. Images that at first seem dark and obscure, suddenly offer glimmers of delicate lightness and hope. The aliens—distorted and bursting with movement, or calmly posed—embody not only the unknown, but also something familiar, inclusive, and engaging.

These obscure and wonderful figures bring to form the everyday feelings and actions that make us human. Viewers are invited to create their own stories, dwell on past memories, and allow the movement to lead them to the deeper interactions found within each work.

Sara Shields is an emerging Toronto artist who primarily specializes in pastel drawings on paper. She graduated from Centennial College’s Fine Arts Studio program in 2010, where she first began developing her distinctive take on figurative drawing. Since graduating, Shields has exhibited in various solo shows, group shows, and art fairs across Ontario. Her drawings have been acquired by Centennial College’s private library and head office collections, are part of the Art Gallery of Ontario art rental and sales program, and have been collected internationally.