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Exhibitions

Carolyn Dinsmore Rock Water Time

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September 9th – October 1st, 2017

Opening Reception: September 9th, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Carolyn Dinsmore entitled Rock Water Time.

 

In Carolyn Dinsmore’s new body of work she draws inspiration from the rock and water of Georgian Bay, zooming in on patterns that are evidence of gradual build-up and erosion layered over infinite time and the always changing water pushing against and flowing alongside.

Her paintings are close-ups, small sections of rock – hard, smooth, rough surfaces resulting from years in formation, surfaces carved, scarred, polished, and lichened. The water details are caught in motion, sometimes gentle and soothing, to powerful and aggressive.

Patterns, mutations from the unfathomably distant past, still indiscernibly reacting to the elements of nature, contrast with those of constant motion, unpredictable, shifting from surging violent force through gentle rhythmic rippling to mirror stillness.

By isolating and highlighting details from the larger landscape the artist is offering to viewers personal and immediate clues, links to the incomprehensible vastness of the environment and the rhythm of time and change.

Carolyn Dinsmore studied art history at Queen’s and the University of Toronto and taught high school art before opening a shop that specialized in textiles mostly from India and  Africa. She returned to school to study at The Art Centre at Central Tech in Toronto. This is her third show at Loop.

Sandra Gregson Troubling

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September 9th – October 1st, 2017

Opening Reception:September 9th, 2 – 5 PM

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Sandra Gregson entitled troubling.

During the summer of 2016 Gregson participated in a Parks Canada residency at Mount Revelstoke in British Columbia. The landscape is spectacular: immeasurable forests, dramatic mountain ranges, fertile river valleys. Awed by the landscape and wanting to reconcile what she was seeing with what she was noticing and researching about environmental concerns (the threatened loss of natural habitat for bears and caribou in Revelstoke to global climate change), Gregson began representing land from different viewpoints: observational, aerial, mapped, detail, perspective, fragments, and historical, to better understand our relationship with it.

Gregson’s paintings depict landscape fraught with human intervention: land that is being divided, mapped, mined, gridded, cut, scraped, reshaped. At times the land appears fertile and resilient, at other times, depleted.

Since using painted images in her animated video, from land (2014), Gregson has worked with water-based oils. Prior to this she worked with sculpture, video, drawing and installation. She holds a BFA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and MFA from York University. Recent exhibitions include Para//el Room at DNA Artspace, London, ON, WIFF Toronto, and Parkdale Film and Video Showcase.

JJ Lee,Amy Swartz,Natalie Waldburger Back to the Drawing Board

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August 15 – September 3, 2017

Reception: Thursday, August 24, 5-7  PM

Artists will be drawing August 15 & 16, 12 -3 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by JJ Lee, Amy Swartz and Natalie Majaba Waldburger entitled Back to the Drawing Board.

 

Back to the Drawing Board is an exhibition of the collaborative work of artists-educators at the intersection of process and labour.  The show will feature large-scale, mixed media and site-specific installation of collaborative drawings.

Drawing as a visual language can bypass societal classifications including cultural, social, economic and educational barriers. As both an organizational and a decolonization strategy, the show will feature the fluidity of the medium, using a variety of drawing materials (including carbon paper, ballpoint pen, charcoal, graph paper, tape and blood) and methods (collage, photocopying). Through the use of ongoing open-ended drawing processes, the fundamental building blocks of drawing point, perspective, line, value will be the basis for the finished installation, but will also question notions of hierarchy and perceptions of power.

Through the collaborative efforts of the involved artists, this project is a necessary and timely tool to address the ongoing conversation about the complexity, and reality of creative work. The exhibition will include collaborative work created both before the exhibition begins and an in-gallery collaborative drawing performance. The artists will be in attendance on Aug 15th and 16th using the process of drawing as a collaborative and performative activity.

“The Drawing Board” is a newly formed group of artist-educator collaborators JJ Lee, Amy Swartz and Natalie Majaba Waldburger.

 

Michael Pflug Paintings

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July 15th – August 6th, 2017

Reception: July 15th, 2 – 5 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Michael Pflug entitled Paintings.

Since the 1940’s, Pflug has produced an incredible oeuvre of modernist and post-modern painting. Inspired to respond to the European movement of New Objectivity, Pflug continues to paint vitally personal and poetic scenes from everyday life to abstract expression. Taking notes from famous artists like Caspar David Friedrich and Saul Steinberg, Pflug decided to innovate into new painterly styles that were unseen at the time. Through his iconic body of work, Loop Gallery is ecstatic to present Pflug’s first ever Toronto retrospective.

Michael Pflug was born in Kassel Germany in 1929. He began painting landscape watercolours in Potsdam 1943. He was mentored by modern painters Viera da Silva and Arpad Scenès in Paris, France. From 1951-1952 he went to Art School in Hamburg. He married Christiane Schutt in 1957, another modern painter. Pflug moved to Toronto in 1960 , where he presently lives and works.

Linda Heffernan Connectivity

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June 17 – July 9, 2017

Reception: June 17, 2-5 p.m.

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Linda Heffernan entitled Connectivity.

Through painterly interventions, Heffernan creates immersive abstracted landscapes that are as aesthetic as they are critical. As Canada’s geography shifts and molds under human influence, Connectivity is concerned with humanity’s continual expansion into our natural landscapes. Her textured works point to the tactility of organic matter, and the ebb and flow of human intervention. Many of her sites of inspiration for the series come from the Canadian Great Lakes Areas of Concern listed on the Government of Canada website, and satellite imagery from Google Earth.

After the recent announcement of the gutting of the American Environmental Protection Agency, and the withdrawal of the U.S from the Paris Climate Accord, Heffernan strives to put the focus back on our ability to interact with our land in a sustainable relationship. As many of the Great lakes run through the US and Canada, there is a shared concern for action that each work proposes. Heffernan’s lines and implied infrastructure, both local and global, suggest a nuanced and detailed network of connections. This patchwork formalises into larger connecting themes of environmentalism, culture, and painterly practice.

Philip Woolf The Edge of the Woods

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May 20 – June 11, 2017

Opening Reception: May 21, 2 – 5 PM

What do we experience as we look out the side window driving along a ribbon of highway that cuts through a heavily wooded landscape? What do we remember? The woods might seem undifferentiated, one thicket resembling the next. These investigations represent a closer look, and yield differentiations.

In my previous body of work, thousands of pictures taken of the ocean yielded a few dozen paintings. Looking at the edge of the woods while driving through the Ontario countryside, I began to discern the possibility of a parallel discourse between landscape compositions and my seascapes. I began taking pictures. Again, hundreds of pictures taken at the side of the road have yielded a handful of paintings so far. I am drawn to photographing thickets. I then examine the captures of gestural entanglements of branches and foliage looking for reveals that resonate with my aesthetic. “Remnants” was produced from a capture taken in the Muskokas; “Overgrowth” is from Magnetawan. While I was parked on the edge of the road when I took these photos, “The Melaleuca Tree” was from a lucky capture taken on my iPhone while I was a passenger speeding along Alligator Alley through the Everglades.

While most of the images in this show are from investigations along the side of the road, as this discourse unfolded, I began to glimpse offerings to the discourse while watching Netflix. As a result, some of the images are worked up from screen captures taken with my iPhone. “An Event in Autumn” was produced from a scene from “Wallander”, and the title of the painting is from title of the episode. Likewise, “11.22.63” was produced after the TV miniseries bearing the same name. The main character, played by James Franco, is about to enter the house and confront a murderous and jealous husband. However, if the viewer does not know any of this, then what do the images signify?

When we see an unoccupied vehicle parked on the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere, what does that signify? What if the vehicle happens to be an old and rusted 4X4 pick-up? What if it’s a late model Mini Cooper?

Overarching everything, the woods are habitats for animals. Driving through Ontario, we might be lucky enough to see a deer, or a moose, or a bear. The woods are also scenes of recreational activity. We see points of ingress for hunters and hikers and nature lovers. But the woods are also sometimes scenes of trauma. Bad things happen there. Searches are organized for missing persons, missing women, lost children. The woods are a place to hide. Crime scenes are found. There are bear attacks. And anyone who has ever experienced trauma in the woods, or who has ever been lost in the woods, knows just how quickly the idyllic can quake and shift, and all that was beautiful and light and colour just a moment before, suddenly becomes sinister and menacing and dark.

While remnants, markers, titles, and other associations and evidences signify events in these landscape paintings, it is also the case that they represent nothing of any singular significance at all, and that they are only that which they seem to be – differentiated locations along the side of the road.

For more information, visit www.phillipwoolf.com.

Lanny Sherek Almost Human

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May 20 – June 11, 2017

Reception: May 21, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

We humans have from the beginning sought to project our humanity into the world around us. We have also been using inanimate materials to create images that represent us. We use stone, wood, metal, and paint to create images of ourselves. We have created powerful computers with which we try to make models of our minds and imagine new artificial beings.

For this exhibition, Almost Human, I have created over 30 different painted heads. They are arranged vertically in totems of three, on alternating backgrounds of blue and red. I try to animate them by giving each a distinct character or personality, yet they all share a mechanical-like construct.

Included in Almost Human are three constructed and painted wood heads. What is interesting to me is the notion of an individual character and the human instinct to read it as such. A group of forty University of Toronto psychology students have written profiles of the heads. The narratives that they weave reflect their own stories and their own individual characters.

For more information, visit www.lannyshereck.com , http://www.loopgallery.ca/portfolio/lanny-sherek/

 

 

Adrian Fish Deutsche Demokratische Republik: The Stasi Archives

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April 22 – May 14, 2017

Reception: Saturday, April 22 3-6PM

 

 

From 1946 to 1989, the former German Democratic Republic (GDR, or East Germany) was engaged in an extensive intra-civilian surveillance program seeking to expose and incarcerate suspected “class enemies.” The program was administered by over 90,000 employees and agents of the Ministry for State Security (colloquially knows as the Stasi), and over 170,000 ordinary East German citizens “volunteered” as unofficial collaborators—about 2.5 percent of the population. The archives were housed in the sprawling campus of the Ministry for State Security in the former city of East Berlin, which served as the processing centre and warehouse for the volumes of documentation related to Stasi activities. The archives are now searchable for citizens of the former GDR who believe their lives were impacted by this systematic surveillance. Over 2.75 million people (mostly former citizens of the GDR) have since made file requests. In this exhibition, Adrian Fish’s photographs document the extant repository of dossiers collected by Stasi officials, in addition to the meeting rooms, offices, and boardrooms preserved after the collapse of the GDR.

For more information, visit afish.ca.

 

Ava Roth Encaustic Sewings

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April 22 – May 14, 2017

Reception: Saturday April 22  3-6PM

 

Ava Roth’s current exhibition, Encaustic Sewings, explores two contrasting traditions of artistic practice.

Each ‘encaustic sewn painting’ in the series begins with aggressive tools: a blow-torch, razor, oil, and resin. Roth finishes her opaque and heavy paintings with a series of delicate—even domestic—tools and media: needle, thread, and delicate papers. Thread or copper is sewn into the wood panels, piercing the encaustic medium.

The ‘encaustic painted embroideries’ take the opposite approach. Roth begins working with embroidery hoops, sewing onto transparent papers with fine threads and decorative beads. Traditional encaustic techniques are invoked by waxing the delicate papers and then suturing their translucent surfaces.

In both series, monochromatic expanses of wax and/or paper are bisected, slashed, or divided. Sewn ligatures strain to hold the divided elements firmly in place as an otherworldly spectacle of colour and texture reveals itself through the fissure.

Roth is a Toronto-based artist whose practice explores encaustic painting, book-binding, embroidery, drawing, textiles, wax-carved jewelry, gouache painting, and installation.

For more information, visit avaroth.com.

 

Rochelle Rubinstein MY ONLY DRINK

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March 25  –  April 16,  2017

Reception: March 26,  2 – 5 PM

The first words got polluted 

Like river water in the morning 

Flowing with the dirt 

Of blurbs and the front pages. 

My only drink is meaning from the deep brain, 

What the birds and the grass and the stones drink. 

Let everything flow 

Up to the four elements, 

Up to water and earth and fire and air. 

—Seamus Heaney, “The First Words,” from the Romanian of Marin Sorescu

 

Rochelle Rubinstein’s exhibition, My Only Drink, consists of four works: Blood, Grass, Water, Wood.

The first two were originally part of a 24-panel installation, called Book of Job, which included hand-painted text and images of soldiers, birds, madonnas and horses. She printed, painted and carved red stripes over ten of the Job panels, and they became Blood. This piece is a celebration of womanhood in the context of present-day misogyny. It also connects to Rubinstein’s involvement in Blood, Milk and Tears, a collective of Muslim and Jewish women working with the subjects of menstruation, breastfeeding and mourning practices.

She transformed the remaining 14 panels into Grass, an aerial view of lush, green land. This piece emerges out of her advocacy work to protect natural grass fields and playgrounds from being replaced with toxic artificial turf.

Water consists of three layers. The first was a miscellaneous collection of block prints including bees, keening Irish women, and Rubinstein’s family in a refugee camp in Italy. Then she covered everything with the Hebrew text of the Orphan’s Kaddish, a mourning prayer. The final layer is an explosion of drops, representing tears, milk, and blood, as well as our precious Ontario aquifers that are being depleted by greedy corporations.

Last is Wood. As is her method, Rubinstein had every intention of adding layers and textures to the striped grid, but something kept stopping her. Finally, she realized there was already a completeness and an expression of solidarity in its simple lines.

—Alisha Kaplan