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Richard Sewell Neopolitan Camouflage

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with guest artist Carmelo Arnoldin

January 12 – February 3, 2019

Opening Reception:  January 12, 2 – 5 PM

 

See Mr. Arnoldin’s “The Trash Brothers”

His wonderful beer-can sourced, hand cut-edged woven tapestry, a graphically composed, in black and gold, can-made double-portrait.

See Mr. Sewell’s towards-the observer 8 ½ x 11 book-like occurrences, sympathize with neopolitan-linear arrangements, be cautious near camouflage patterns, stand in proximity with locations, objects, surfaces, coloured tarpaulins & duct-tapes, extruded/cut foam-forms; sequenced: silicone and cable-tie connectors, cut/torn remnants, orange/black critter resistant-meshes…and (although hidden from view)… strong magnets which secure autobiographical objects into one story punctuated by a biscotti-cookie,  a yellow post-it pad, a large free-range egg, a Pliocene-smoothed mini stone, 2 Home Depot small bi-coloured clamps, 1 used black china marking pencil (with pull-string), 1 too-squeezed toothpaste tube, a 1940’s heirloom ice-cream scoop, and local-notations locale-spelled, laminated and locale positioned about: actual locational-words.

 

Mark Adair The Fountain Project

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January 12 – February 3, 2019

Opening Reception: January 12 2-5 PM

 


At what point does a culture surrender its will to go on? Does it ever occur that cultures, just like individuals, simply lie down and die from weariness or self contempt? Can a complex cultural aggregate simply ‘lose the thread’? And can an immoral culture thrive, breed and thrust forward vital leadership?

A couple of years ago I showed the sculpture Head for a Fountain. An intuitive response to the rise of demagogical politics, the piece started life as the carving of a demon’s head. The transitional moment (when it became an architectural detail) occurred during a visit to Rochelle Rubinstein’s Bela farm, when Patti Muratori suggested that the head belonged to a fountain. In that moment, water being the theme of our visit to Bela, the Muratori/Adair collaboration The Fountain Project was born.

In this Loop show, there are two iterations of The Fountain Project: one from wood, the other concrete and slate. Together, they trace the evolution of the fountain from gallery object to functioning garden water supply. Within the context of the show, they exist parallel to the sixteen drawings from the Death Drinks series of charcoal miniatures.

 

Mary Catherine Newcomb A . . .

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December 8 – 30,  2018

Opening Reception: December 8, 2018

 Mary Catherine Newcomb’s  A… exposes the plight of a significant but silent and ignored group of people, while inviting the viewer to ponder the roles, consequences and function of exclusion in larger contexts.

Rage, humiliation, shame, self doubt and a loss of self respect are only a few of the destructive emotions that exclusion evokes. Wresting with these feelings is a messy, painful, confusing, undignified and interminable hell. The lucky, like the heroes of myth, emerge transformed, while the unlucky or inexperienced flounder.

For Newcomb, this isn’t an abstract idea. The artist has a stigmatized and misrepresented health issue, and has been unable to return to work because providing a safe environment for her conflicts with the rights of others.

Referencing personal experience and her body, Newcomb draws the viewer into a realm that acknowledges a direct animal response to exclusion, and alludes to the mythic demand for sacrifice. In her use of historical imagery, she asks whether this situation is merely a modern iteration of an inescapable human drama.

In The Scarlet Letter, heroine Hester Prynne is ostracized for sexual transgression. She is ordered to wear her shame in the form of a scarlet ‘A’ (for adulteress) sewn onto her clothing. In contrast to her defiant, embellished A, Newcomb’s A… stands for allergic and asthmatic (and artist) . . .

As physical and social environments rapidly change, various people, species and landscapes cannot survive. Mary Catherine is proud to be, in her own small way, going down on the same ship as other tested individuals and species. A is for absent.

About the Artist

Mary Catherine Newcomb is a sculptor, installation artist and teacher. She studied biological science at the University of Toronto and the University of Guelph before committing to a career as an artist. She holds a general degree from the University of Toronto, a BFA from the University of Waterloo and an MFA from York University. She has exhibited work across Canada and in Germany, and is the recipient of many grants and awards. She is a member of the Nethermind collective, and has taught at various institutions in Southern Ontario — most recently for the Ontario College system.

The artist would like to thank Two Smiths and Robert McNair, who donated time and resources to help raise awareness of an ignored issue. She also wants to acknowledge the unrecognized bravery of individuals who have responded with legal challenges to the transportation industry’s carelessness and apparent determination to put health and lives of the vulnerable at risk.

David Holt Paintings

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December 8 – 30,  2018

Opening Reception: December 8, 2 – 5 PM

Loop is proud to announce Orvieto Paintings, an exhibition of recent work by David Holt.

The paintings in this exhibition were completed over the past two years, and are part of a larger ongoing series of works involving history, architecture and religion. Most grew out of work from two summers in Orvieto, Italy. Some are based directly on sculpture from the Orvieto Duomo façade, while others reference a range of Early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval sources. Many are variations on emblematic (rather than narrative) depictions of Christian saints. Other paintings freely interpret the shapes found in religious architecture. The compositional grids of most of the paintings allow for a playful visual interplay of motifs. 

The artist wishes to thank the Art in Orvieto program of the Institute for Christian Studies in Toronto and Gordon College in Orvieto for their collegial support. 

About the Artist

Holt is a painter whose works are in private collections in the USA and Canada. He has been a recipient of a painting grant from the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation and an artist’s residency at the Ragdale Foundation. A professor of art for many years at Marymount College (later part of Fordham University) in Tarrytown, New York, he has lived and worked in Toronto since 2005, teaching art at Upper Canada College. 

For more information, visit: https://sites.google.com/site/davidholtpaintings/

Elizabeth D’Agostino Other Collisions

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November 10 – December 2, 2018

Opening Reception: November 10,  2 – 5 PM

Elizabeth D’Agostino’s latest exhibition at Loop Gallery, examines the precarious balance of habitat loss and human interconnection.

During the summer of 2017, D’Agostino with her family ventured on a road trip to Sointula, BC, a small coastal fishing village on Malcolm Island accessible only by ferry. While in Sointula she took part in the Sointula Art Shed Residency, gathering research material and producing a number of drawings and collages of local flora and fauna. Through the exploration of the management of living systems in nature and their interactions with humans, this body of work illustrates animal nature and the complexities of the changing landscape, emphasizing how various paths have been interrupted.

Other Collisions is a series of multi-layered etchings, digital prints and sculptures on Gampi tissue, a resilient Japanese paper. The use of Gampi tissue provides a surface that is both visceral and transformative, and transfers the etched line sinuously through both the transparent and translucent layers.

Each image oscillates between the real and fabricated, creating new arrangements influenced by their formal characteristics and habitats. This body of work employs strategies related to biodiversity and references images from plants, animals and microorganisms that inhabit the Canadian landscape. 

Fictitious environments and constructed stories merge these elements, creating a dialogue between the natural and human-made world. When installed, the prints and print-based objects produce a catalogue of re-purposed environments and fictional categories of nature within a narrative.

About the Artist

Elizabeth D’Agostino holds a BFA from the University of Windsor and a MFA from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and internationally including Iziko: Museum of Cape Town, South Africa, Manhattan Graphics Center, New York, and The Print Center, Philadelphia. In addition, D’Agostino’s prints can also be found in many private and public collections including the University of Changchun Jilin, China; Anchor Graphics at Columbia College Chicago, Illinois, Department of Foreign Affairs Canada, and Ernst and Young, Canada. 

D’Agostino is the recipient of many awards and including the Hexagon Special Projects Fellowship at Open Studio, Toronto. In 2015, she was selected by the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada to create the custom carpet design for the Ontario Room in the newly renovated Canada House, London, England.

Elizabeth D’Agostino lives and works in Toronto and is a member of Open Studio Fine Art Printmaking Centre and Loop Gallery.