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Adrian Fish The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation

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June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23rd, 2 – 5 PM

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (commonly known as UAVs or drones) are a relatively new technology in a nascent stage of development. The ability to accurately maneuver a camera at high altitudes to inexpensively produce high-quality photographic imagery is a remarkably powerful technological development. The ability of UAVs to operate from these elevated perspectives – well above those previously made possible by stands, booms, scaffolds or tripods – invites many new subject explorations. 

My research interest is in building an archive of UAV images and videos that document the edges of urban/built environments. The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation is an exploration of the physical framework of the roads, buildings, intersections and parking lots of contemporary urban territory mingling with natural environments.

The images are presented on screens as moving stills – short video loops that offer insight into the organizations and patterns of the framework of urbanity. My intention is to insert UAV-generated material into the public sphere for contemplation and critical reflection on the impact and aesthetics of urban development.

About the Artist

Adrian Fish is a Toronto-born photo-based artist and educator currently living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Adrian holds an MFA from York University in Toronto, as well as undergraduate accreditation from OCAD University in Toronto and the Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, ON. His work has shown numerous public institutions, artist-run centres and commercial galleries in Calgary, Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Winnipeg in Canada, as well as internationally in Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn and Chelsea, NY, Columbus, OH, Berlin, Germany, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Tokyo, Japan. 

Adrian’s work has been featured in publications such as Canadian Art, Vice Magazine and WIRED.com. Adrian is currently Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Media Arts at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  

loop elsewhere SUMMER EDITION

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image: Jane Lowbeer, Small Things, found objects, 11″ x 4″, 2018

KELLY CADE

Last chance to catch Kelly’s exhibition at Hatch Gallery in Prince Edward County until June 15th, 2018. Gallery hours are Wednesday to Sunday – 11am to 5:00pm.

LIBBY HAGUE

The catalogue for INTERVENTION: 31 WOMEN PAINTERS,  the Montreal painting show at the McClure Gallery which was curated by Harold Klunder is now available from ABC Art Books. http://www.abcartbookscanada.com/

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s exhibition, Preponderance of the Small, will be at the Visual Art Centre of Clarington  from June 3 to July 1st.
Unusual gallery hours are 10am – 9pm Tuesday  to Thursday and 10am to 4pm Friday-Sunday. Jane will also be giving an Artist Talk on June 17th 2pm – 4pm.

AVA ROTH

Ava has a solo exhibition coming up, from July 6-August 25th, at the Agnes Jameison Gallery in Minden, ON. Opening reception is July 6th from 4:30 – 6pm. Layer Landscapes: Wax and Thread, explores the tension between permanent and temporary, solid and delicate and transparent and opaque.

John Ide What Paper Remembers

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May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 26, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is proud to present What Paper Remembers, a collection of new work by John Ide. In his own words:

“Earlier this year I was going through some old drawings and wondered what would happen if I erased some of them and reworked what was left. I’ve been erasing ever since, and redrawing based on what the paper remembers.

Erasing is part of my drawing process, inspired in large part by how much the printmaking paper I use refuses to “forget.” This random refusing to forget forces me to respond and I find the push-pull creatively stimulating.” 

What Paper Remembers continues Ide’s exploration of the connections between memory, history and the artistic process. Please join us on Sunday, May 27th from 2-5 p.m., as we celebrate the exhibition’s opening. 

John Ide is a longstanding loop member who has exhibited widely in Toronto and beyond. The preoccupation with personal and collective memory has been an ongoing theme in his work across disparate media. After years of installation-based work, Ide returned to drawing in 2006 and has continued to evolve his practice in the years since. 

Adrienne Trent The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature

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May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 27, 2 – 5  PM

 

 Popular culture revolves around the idea that actors, sets, spoken lines and special effects are not a constructed reality, shot frame-by-frame to enable the viewer to get lost in the plot, but rather reality itself. This creates a ‘false consciousness,’ based on ersatz representations which television and film makers intend for viewers. I began to pursue the idea of exploring this false, fabricated reality as the basis for an exhibition, particularly as it’s a subject I have close, first-hand knowledge of: I’ve worked in art departments in the Toronto film industry for the last 20 years.

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature includes a projected video loop consisting of a series of 3 minute videos. I filmed them while rustling trees and observing lighting and special effects on a successful, 4-season (so far) American TV series. At the beginning of Season 3, the executive producers informed me that some viewers had called to express a particular disturbance: during interior scenes, the trees which I’d placed outside the windows were not “moving in the breeze” and therefore “didn’t look real.” To solve this thorny problem, I was asked to shake the trees manually by tying filament to them and gently rustling them, during the brief takes in which a window with an exterior view was in the shot.

 

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature consists of footage of myself in the act of shaking the trees; I also caught on video a helium “moon” whose artificial light shone down onto a constructed waterfall, and a cozy living room, whose crackling fireplace flames up instantly thanks to a quick propane torch.

 

In addition to the projection, the administrative desk has been subjected to a process referred to in film as “breakdown.” This indicates the artificial aging of props, sets and costumes on a film set to emulate the time period in which the story takes place. Though I’ve worked on projects that span millennia, for the objects in this show I’ll limit history to the last ten years, a period not yet obsolete and dingy. The act of re-inscribing recent history on an object speaks to the central role this ‘false consciousness’ plays in the creative process. 

 

My film work has enabled me to experience a wide variety of projects and budgets. I’ve been hired onto multimillion dollar projects such as Pompeii, as well as many small independent films, and also union productions for notable directors such as Denis Villeneuve, Denys Arcand, Deepa Mehta, Bruce MacDonald, Don McKellar and zombie guru George Romero.

 

 

Libby Hague Wider than the sky

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April 28 – May 20, 2018

Opening Reception:  April 28, 2-5 PM

Artist Conversation: May 20, 3-5 PM

Wider than the sky is an exhibition of large woodcuts and a mixed media project by Libby Hague, produced enthusiastically in the OCADU Digital Painting Residency.

“My work examines complex social relationships in a precarious world. I feel that everything we value (ourselves, our relationships, our country, our planet) is fragile and we have to find a way not to be overwhelmed by the anger and noise around us and work together to find common ground.”

Wider than the sky uses the imagination to locate patterns that bring the vast macro and micro scales of science (the cosmos, DNA) together with text and objects, the daily gestures and concerns of a clamorous world. It’s like looking at the stars and thinking “Here I am, part of this in some small way.” It’s not a lonely thought; it connects us to an orderly universe – one growing infinitesimally more comprehensible – a comforting thought right now.

Rather than attempting to overwhelm the viewer, the artist leaves “breathing spaces” in these complex systems, breaks for perspective and attention, to reaffirm human values of kindness and consideration and let us listen to each other.

Libby Hague has a hybrid practice of printmaking and installation. Her recent exhibitions include The past is never over: a retrospective, Art Gallery of Mississauga; Inventing Hope, Idea Exchange, Ontario; Departures – Masterpieces of Canadian Printing, Ardell Gallery of Modern Art, Bangkok; Habitat, Harbourfront, Toronto.

Find Libby online at http://libbyhague.com/.