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Loop Gallery & Wellington Water Watchers Water Advisory!

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March 3 – 25, 2018

Exhibition Launch:  Sunday, March 4th – 1 PM

 

 

 

Just in time for Water Week (March 20 – 27) and World Water Day (March 22), Loop Gallery and Wellington Water Watchers are proud to announce WATER ADVISORY! Featuring work by Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, WATER ADVISORY! combines art and activism to explore the disconnect between society and the water that sustains it.

WATER ADVISORY! is an intersectional call to action that urges viewers to interrogate their own relationship to the natural world through banners, print, and mixed media installations. Exhibiting artists include Beehive Collective, Crystal Sinclair, Tannis Nielson, Claudia Wong, Sally Pang, Erika James, Carol Cheong, Paul Morin, Sarit Cantor, and more

WATER ADVISORY! launches on Sunday March 4 at 1 pm with a conversation with the artists, followed by a performance by hip-hop group Test Their Logik. The exhibition will be open to the public from 12-5 pm Wednesdays and Thursdays, 12-6 pm Fridays and Saturdays, and 1-4 pm on Sundays, until March 25. Educators wishing to arrange a classroom visit should contact Tim Welsh at tim@loopgallery.ca, or call the gallery directly at 416 516-2581.

WATER ADVISORY! is curated by Crystal Sinclair and Loop artist Rochelle Rubinstein. A co-founder of Idle No More and recipient of the OPSEU 2016 Human Rights and Equity award, Crystal Sinclair has a long history of art and activism around clean water campaigns for Indigenous communities. Rochelle Rubinstein is a printmaker, painter, fabric and book artist, environmental activist, and community arts facilitator.

 

 

Kristen Fahrig Body Imprints

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February 3 – 25th, 2018

Opening Reception: February 3rd, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is honoured to present Body Imprints, a retrospective of work by Kristen Fahrig.

Kristen Fahrig was a sculptor, educator and cultural animator who lived and worked in Toronto’s West End. Until her death last fall, she was best known for the numerous community art projects she initiated in her neighbourhood, as well as the public performances she created for the BIG on Bloor Festival, the Luminato Festival and the WinterCity Festival at Toronto City Hall.

Nowhere was Kristen’s community presence more keenly felt than at MacGregor Playground, a once-deserted park on Lansdowne Avenue. First as the playground’s artist-in-residence, and later as artistic director of the non-profit Botanicus Art Ensemble, Kristen’s tireless presence over a decade-and-a-half transformed MacGregor Playground into a family-friendly community hub. Over a shared love of art, theatre, craft and gardening, Kristen brought her neighbours together.

Body Imprints is a posthumous presentation of Kristen’s late sculptures. It shows the most personal side of her artistic practice, for which she struggled to gain recognition in her lifetime. Here, Kristen’s energy is turned inwards — to the self, the body and the natural world — to produce a diaristic sequence of sculptural reflections. “It’s about the imprints that the body makes,” Kristen wrote of these works. “The body is the negative space into which we can project ourselves and feel our connection with the earth.”

About the Curator 

Rupert Nuttle is a writer and painter based in Toronto. He received a BFA from NSCAD in 2013 and a Masters of Journalism from Carleton University in 2017. He has exhibited his paintings widely in Canada and abroad, and his art writing has appeared in C Magazine and Canadian Art, among other publications.

Eunha Kim Joy of Life

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February 3 – 25th, 2018

Opening Reception: Saturday, February 3rd 2 – 5 PM

 

Eunha Kim’s Joy of Life is inspired by Nong-Ak, a traditional Korean music/dance form. Now showcased in formal performances, Nong-Ak originally celebrated rural holidays and the wish for a good harvest.

A highly expressive art form, Nong-Ak combines singing, dancing, and drumming. Dancers wear a traditional hat, known as a Sangmo – as they spin, the Sangmo’s long ribbons form whirling patterns that accompany the dancers’ celebratory, acrobatic motions.

Kim’s work is an attempt to visualize the sound and movement of Nong-Ak, and the joy of life expressed by the dancing farmers’ dynamic, head-spinning motions. Utilizing dripping paint and mixed media, she communicates her own joy in working outside of representative form, and invites her audience to feel the uplift and excitement of the Nong-Ak dancers.

Kim’s process mirrors the energy of motion inherent to Nong-Ak. As she sprinkles and drops paint and ink, highly kinetic lines emerge on the canvas. Her careful use of color creates a harmonic effect, similar to that of the well-coordinated instruments in a Nong-Ak performance.

By reimagining rural tradition, Joy of Life draws a connection from the past to the present. In her own words:

The “joy of life” that I focus is not simply what the farmers had in the past. In our daily lives nowadays, we sometimes suffer from depression, pessimism, heavy burden of life, and feelings of loneliness. Under the circumstances, however, I hope that the aesthetics and the approach I take on my work will offer people in the world comfort, and excitement to live. 

Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Eunha Kim is a Toronto-based artist. This is her first exhibition as a Loop member.

loop elsewhere NEW YEAR EDITION

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 left to right: Marian Wihak, detail from Excavation(…closer to where we began)
and Libby Hague, detail from. Nov 8 Double Vision, 2008, 11 x 14 in. Oil and acrylic on canvas
 

LIBBY HAGUE

Libby’s retrospective, The Past is Never Over, closes January 1, 2018 at the Art Gallery of Mississauga.
http://www.artgalleryofmississauga.com
and the exhibition brochure can be downloaded here www.artgalleryofmississauga.com/downloads/LibbyHague_broch_17502_web.pdf

Also, her work is included in Intervention: 31 Women Painters at the McClure Gallery of the Visual Arts Centre in Montreal.
www.visualartscentre.ca/mcclure-gallery/the-gallery/
Invited Curator: Harold Klunder
Vernissage: Thursday February 1 at 6 pm
Exhibition: February 2 to 24
Conference: Friday February 2 at 7 pm
libbyhague.com

DAVID HOLT

David will be leading another summer studio art workshop for practicing artists in Orvieto, Italy, exploring connections between art and religion. The workshop will run from July 15 to August 4, 2018 and will take advantage of the area’s rich historical tradition of religious material culture from its Etruscan origins onward. Also available are a Seminar in art history, religion, and theology. Graduate level university credit available.
For more information about the Residency for Artists, Writers, and Graduate Students and how to participate visit:

MARIAN WIHAK

Marian’s installation EXCAVATION(…closer to where we began) is  part of this year’s Toronto Design Offsite Festival (TODO). This work was originally commissioned by LabSpace and Sculpting New Reads and was shown as part of the long-stranding one-day event, Word on the Street held at Harbourfront Toronto in September 2017. Wihak was invited to respond to Lisa Richter’s new book of poetry “Closer to Where We Began” and it was an auspicious pairing that has enriched both artists’ work.

Opening Reception is Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 6-9pm
with Lisa Richter reading from her new book of poetry, Closer to Where We Began
The exhibition is being staged in collaboration with Pekota Design under the joint title ElevationExcavation as part of the 2018 Toronto Design Offsite Festival.
Pekota Design, 406 Pacific Avenue (in the Junction)
Exhibition runs from  JANUARY 16th to 21st, 2018

P. Roch Smith got’em, got ’em, need ’em

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January 6th – 28th, 2018

Opening Reception: January 13th, 2-5 PM

Q & A: Sunday, January 28th, 2 PM

P. Roch Smith’s got ’em, got ’em, need ’em recreates and reimagines the entire set of 1975 – 76 O-Pee-Chee NHL hockey cards. Each of the 395 individually framed cards in the set has been digitally altered in terms of colour, scale, and legibility.

The title refers to the verbal cues associated with sorting through another person’s collection — a mantra that would signal a potential trade. Growing up in the 1970s, collecting a complete set of hockey cards was the Everest of childhood ambitions. In his choice of the 1975-76 season, Smith has sought to fill the voids of a childhood collection by creating his personal “complete set”.

Collectively, these images continue Smith’s longtime exploration of memory and object. They are positioned at the intersection of sport and play as a trigger for questioning the creative act — of mass culture and its relationship to contemporary art. The installation examines the notion of what it means to be complete and the role of process as it relates to production of artifacts.

Smith is less interested in the idea of a collectible as a commodity than other questions: what drives the compulsion to collect something in the first place? How does one decide what to collect? When does one thing cease to be merely an object, and become part of a collection of other things?

Jean Baudrillard argues that “all objects in a collection become equivalent, thanks to that process of passionate abstraction we call possession. Further, a simple object can never be enough: invariably there will be a whole succession of objects…”  As an object maker, Smith both acquires things and produces pieces that make their way into other people’s collections. Perhaps, therefore, it is the concept of worth that may only be seen through absence.

P. Roch Smith was born and raised on Vancouver Island and currently lives and maintains a studio in Toronto. Working primarily within the realm of sculpture, Smith also generates installations, paintings, and drawings as part of his artistic output. Smith received a BFA from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and an MFA from York University. He has taught classes at the University of Waterloo, ECIAD, and York University. He has been a member of loop Gallery since 2014, and currently manages and operates the bronze and aluminum foundry at York University.

Smith has exhibited internationally and is included in private as well as public collections in Canada and the United States. His sculptures are available through the Oeno Gallery located in Prince Edward County, ON.

For more information, visit rochsmith.com, or visit his pages on instagram (@rochsmith) and twitter (@_rochsmith).