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kipjones – staged standards

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March 26th – April 17th, 2016
Reception: Saturday, April 2nd, 2-5 p.m.

#3

loop Gallery is pleased to announce Staged Standards, a new exhibition by kipjones.

 

Staged Standards is a response to an ongoing study into architectural iconography as a sculptural gesture. The work consists of a series of materially aesthetic investigations of formally staged wooden fabrications and their echoed forms.  These austere scaled assemblies of an architectural vernacular address the notions of permanence and transformation as a reflective relationship between the elements.

 

The latex rubber forms act as dualistic moments in an inter-connected relationship with their mirrored wooden original. Pragmatically this work utilizes the inherent properties of latex rubber, its skin like qualities and it structural integrity, as containers of forms and icons.  The hard surfaced reality occupies a antipodean position in relation to the soft skinned latex empty vessels, constituting a connective bridging of the organic and the man-made – the mind and body – nature and culture.

 

Staged Standards are formal self-reflective acts of inherent tension and linked associations, a redefined vocabulary of form.

 

kipjones is an active and experienced Toronto public artist, sculptor and instructor. His artistic research addresses the complex potentialities of space through site-specific installations, public art and object making. He graduated 2011 with an MFA: sculpture from Concordia University in Montreal.  He has exhibited and participated in residencies nationally and internationally.  His public art can be engaged with in Kelowna BC, Calgary AL, Moncton NB, and most recently Gambrel Journey for the City of Markham Ontario.

 

Elizabeth D’Agostino – Makeshift

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March 26th – April 17th, 2016
Reception: Saturday, April 2nd, 2-5 p.m.

Makeshift I

loop Gallery is pleased to announce Makeshift, a new exhibition by Elizabeth D’Agostino.

D’Agostino has spent the last few years building fictitious environments merging elements both real and imagined. As a child, she curiously watched her father graft his backyard fruit trees. She would watch him carefully join sections from separate varieties of trees and as a result would produce an assortment of fruit from a single tree in an urban setting.

 

Makeshift chronicles D’Agostino’s fascination with grafting and attempts to create a catalogue of re-organized components and fictional categories of nature with an invented narrative.  D’Agostino draws from biodiversity and the complexities of the changing landscape emphasizing how various paths of nature have been interrupted by rapidly producing populations.

 

D’Agostino holds a BFA from the University of Windsor and an MFA from Southern Illinois University.  Her work has been exhibited in Canada and internationally including The Kelowna Art Gallery, Iziko: Museum of Cape Town, South Africa, Manhattan Graphics Center, New York, and The Print Center, Philadelphia. D’Agostino’s prints can also be found in many private and public collections including the University of Changchun Jilin, China; Anchor Graphics at Columbia College Chicago, Illinois, Department of Foreign Affairs Canada, and Ernst and Young, Canada. She was awarded an Honourable Mention in the 2014 National Open Studio Printmaking Awards, and was selected by the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada to create a carpet design in the Ontario Room for the newly renovated Canada House in London, England.

 

D’Agostino lives and works in Toronto and is currently the Managing Director of the Toronto School of Art. She is also a member of Open Studio Fine Art Printmaking Centre.

 

Richard Sewell – compression

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February 27th – March 20th, 2016
Reception: Saturday, February 27th, 2-5 p.m.

richard

Then. A long time ago, wHer between eolith and artefact, near geoglyph:

Local, one observant, located toward > image. Their nascent: locale, one, object and surface, sequenced about ensemble- about a curious notation toward > preference.

Now. Current, wHer ensemble occurs: locale, one, object, surface- a worded notation, humanly a-sequence, about-curiously needing-allowing- one, two:

Too < use > image. Here curiosities! wHer locations, observations, sequences, local- ensemble, move one: toward > encouragements; < away from cautions.

 

Richard Sewell co-founded Open Studio in 1970; continued as artist, printmaker, publisher, and collaborator in: dance, music, and performance; taught with several Canadian colleges and universities; retired professor emeritus from Sheridan College in 2008. Mr. Sewell exhibited in, staged and/or curated presentations in Canada, the United States, Australia, England, Europe, South Korea, Japan, and recently with KWAG, AGO, Open Studio, and Harbourfront. Now imageologist, Mr. Sewell pursues wHer, geoplasticimage: gpi, and locusethics, a 3-part work/query about one located curiosity called image. Mr. Sewell lives in Grand Bend, Ontario.

Tara Cooper – Contre Vents et Marées

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February 27th – March 20th, 2016
Reception: Saturday, February 27th, 2-5 p.m.

tara

This exhibition takes cues from Sir Francis Beaufort, the inventor of the Beaufort wind scale. Invented primarily for the Royal Navy in 1807, the 13-point scale remains a standard for estimating the force of winds through visual observations recorded at sea and on land. The exhibition’s title Contre Vents et Marées is a meteorological idiom; its English translation against winds and tides is understood in French as the ability to continue despite obstacles. Constructed as a series of floating platforms, the exhibition combines print, ceramics, sculpture and meteorological instruments that tell us how the winds are blowing.

Tara Cooper draws from meteorology and creative non-fiction, resulting in projects housed under the moniker Weather Girl. She received her MFA from Cornell University, specializing in the disciplines of print, short film and installation. Recent accomplishments include residencies at Anderson Ranch Art Center, The Wassaic Project and Landfall Trust, as well as arts council grants from Ontario and Canada. Her exhibition record spans more than a decade, covering local, national and international venues. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Fine Arts at the University of Waterloo. This exhibition was made in collaboration with her partner (and husband) Terry O’Neill.

 

Gareth Bate – Cape Flora

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January 30th – February 21st, 2016
Reception: Saturday, January 30th, 2-5 p.m.
Q & A: Sunday February 21st, 2 p.m.

gareth

Gareth says: “My new Cape Flora paintings are about letting go and allowing myself to just make art without ideas about what kind of an artist I am – or ought to be. There’s no political agenda, no intellectual concepts and nothing capital C contemporary blah blah. My new philosophy of art making is “I don’t give a crap.” Or perhaps the more Bhagavad Gita way of saying it  – detachment from the outcome. (I love the Bhagavad Gita by the way.) Now of course I care deeply about making art. I just don’t care what imagery comes out. As they’d say on LOST – Whatever happened happened. No judgement, no expectations. The result – remarkably – is totally coherent and one of the best bodies of work I’ve done. I love these paintings.

Every year I visit North Lake –  a little fishing village in Prince Edward Island. A really special place. Every night, sitting around the dining room table with my partner Graham – I’d just draw in markers. I didn’t care what happened because they didn’t matter. The results were boisterous and vibrant drawings of plants, flowers and amorphous sea creatures. It was so liberating.

I’d been working on a body of work for a year and was sick to death of it. It was stale and contrived. When I returned to Toronto – in one day – I painted over 30 paintings – a year of work! I experimented with an “automatic” approach. This meant I just launched right in with spontaneous brushwork and went wild. No conscious thought or intention. Whatever imagery emerged I just went with it.

Immediately the paintings had a raw vitality. An explosion of new life. Spring bursting out, letting go. They’re filled with vines, knots, nerves, trees, leaves, blossoms and glowing lights. A cosmic garden or tree of life. Swirls of colour and churning vortexes of tangled webs and crisscrossing vines. These elements then repeat and rearrange themselves in new ways. My intentional paintings would never have looked like this! I feel rejuvenated, like I’ve released a ton of built up tension and anxiety. Over the last few months I’ve refined these images into finished paintings without losing their initial impulse.

I now recognize that the paintings feel reminiscent of my 2015 trip to South Africa. I was born there and we left when I was six because of Apartheid. I was returning after almost two decades. In Cape Town I visited the spectacular Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden at the foot of Table Mountain. I was with my half-sister who I was meeting for the first time. The remarkable collection of local fynbos and protea plants seeped into my mind.

For me the paintings feel reminiscent of the tangled vines in the Book of Kells, the gardens in Indian Mughal miniatures, the weaving of Islamic calligraphy, microscopic photos of cells and the plant patterns of William Morris. All completely accidental – filtering into my mind over the years and bursting out now – because I finally let it.”

Gareth Bate is a Toronto artist working in painting, installation and photography. He’s the co-curator of Oakville’s World of Threads Festival of contemporary fibre/textile art. He teaches abstract painting and art history at Central Tech. He does art tours of galleries and museums called “Art World Untangled.” Subscribe here to get his weekly emails about making art, art history and the art world. You can see more of his work at garethbate.com
Image:  Cape Flora, acrylic on wood, 12 x 12, 2015.