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Marian Wihak Marking Time

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October 13 – November 4, 2018

Opening Reception: October 13, 2-5 PM

Collective City film screening: October 20, 3 PM

 Loop Gallery is proud to present Marking Time, an interdisciplinary exhibition of work by Marian Wihak. Marking Time continues the artist’s interest in creating situations that vacillate between the haptic and the evocative, driven by overarching notions of connectivity, duration, and the vicissitudes inherent within the evolutionary process. Wihak conjures metaphorical and suggestive narratives that reflect on the various ways time inscribes itself upon our world and also, how we, in turn, fit into the vast trajectory of existence. In her own words:

“The leaping off point for this new exhibition, Marking Time, is Archipelago — a large-scale oil painting I did on Fogo Island while attending a residency there in 2011. This will be Archipelago’s professional Toronto debut, and it is a singular and visceral work, which I painted directly onto the plywood wallboards supplied to us in the Fogo Island Long Studio. It stands as an homage and portrait of an island forged 420 million years ago by ice, fire and sea, the markings of which manifest at every turn, as geological scars and patterns, rock forms, tidal pools and time-worn textures, in expansive and minute scales equally.

“New graphite drawings created to respond to and complement Archipelago explore a range of demarcations, ravages and ruptures, all traces and evidence of our planet’s evolution. The graphite offers velvety weight and gravitas while at the same time as it lends transcendence through specific erasures, and metaphoric agency that exploits the marriage of material and theme. Three timeworn boulders resolutely mark the space between Archipelago and the graphite drawings, and offer haptic resting spots from which to take in the work.

“A video comprised of an assemblage of shifting images that I have gathered in the course of various travels, presents as a view into and across time, with the markings of geological evolution and process a relentless presence.

“My intention with Marking Time is that each of these individual works possesses their own agency, at the same time as the assembled installation invites an engaging spatial experience and offers an oblique yet compelling narrative.”

Yael Brotman The Wormwood Series

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October 13 – November 4, 2018

Opening Reception: October 13, 2-5 PM

Collective City film screening: October 20, 3 PM

 

The Wormwood Series, Yael Brotman’s latest exhibition at Loop Gallery, examines the push and pull of creation and destruction — and the curious forms of agency humans possess within that cycle. The artist explains her process as follows: 

“On a recent trip to Spain, I visited Gaudi’s famous cathedral in Barcelona. The columns of the interior are designed to look like giant plants with nodes and branches extending into graceful arches. The feeling that one experiences in the presence of this magnificence is that nature and spirituality are intimately bound. The other sense the viewer gets is how small humans are – we are like worms in a forest.

“The concept of the worm as metaphor for human presence in the world is one I have been playing with recently. The yin-yang capacity of worms for health or destruction is similar to the highs and lows of human action.

“In this series, I began by doing rubbings of the meandering lines of the worms’ progress. I used delicate Japanese paper so that the nuances of the surface would be visible. The Japanese paper was chine colleed onto a stronger substrate. I then drew with graphite and watercolour, incorporating imagery of architectural elements or garden designs. These works are quiet pieces that recall the awe felt in the presence of tall trees or brilliant human structures, or the beautiful evidence of a worm’s markmaking.” 

About the Artist

Yael Brotman has exhibited widely, with thirty solo exhibitions including in Winnipeg, MB and Dawson City, YK, and numerous group/two-person shows including in Spain, Kyoto, Houston, Berlin, Melbourne. Her work has been discussed in catalogues (Kelowna Art Gallery and Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art) and in reviews (Border Crossings, Galleries West and La Presse+).

Brotman has been awarded residencies worldwide, grants and honours – recently, induction into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. Her work is represented in public and corporate collections including Foreign Affairs (Canada), Skirball Museum (Los Angeles), Sanbao Museum (Jingdezhen, China) and the Proyecto’ace Collection (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

 

loop elsewhere FALL EDITION

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installation view of Pink Cities; Green Branches, Yael Brotman and Libby Hague, 2018.

 

Yael Brotman and Libby Hague

Yael and Libby exhibited a collaborative installation Pink Cities; Green Branches at the Centro Cultural Doctor Madrazo, in Santander, Spain as part of the Impact 10 Print Conference.

Adrienne Trent and Marian Wihak

Adrienne and Marian, along with Toronto artists Ellen Bleiwas, Emily DiCarlo and Gunilla Josephson, have created a site-responsive art installation, OUROBOROS, situated within the stunning interior of the Byzantine Revival gem, St. Anne’s Anglican Church, 270 Gladstone Ave, at Dundas.

September 22nd until Oct 14th, Friday – Sunday noon – 5pm
Opening Reception: September 27th, 6 – 9pm
Nuit Blanche: September 29th, 7pm – midnight with musical performances: Turkwaz at 7:30pm and Darbazi at 8:30  (free will donation)
Artist talk and tour: October 14th at 2pm

OUROBOROS:
Known as the oldest allegorical symbol in alchemy, the ouroboros represented the concept of eternity and endless return. The symbol of a snake eating its own tail in a closed circle has been found in varied contexts and geographies. The artists in the exhibition Ouroboros at St. Anne’s Anglican Church, pose an inquiry into the cyclical themes of connectedness and continuity within each artwork.
Toronto artists Ellen Bleiwas, Emily DiCarlo, Gunilla Josephson, Adrienne Trent and Marian Wihak share a network of overlapping relationships. The arc of time, space and history, and the connective impacts and resonances activated are shared drivers of their practices.  Each one shares a world view that includes the evanescent, the ephemeral and the past with the subsequent talismans, relics, and vestiges of these histories used as markers and reminders of a larger realm of connectedness.
Jennifer Rudder.

Tanya Cunnington Dream, comfort, memory

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September 15 – October 7, 2018

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 15, 2-5 PM

Loop Gallery is proud to present Dream, comfort, memory, an exhibition of new work by Tanya Cunnington. The paintings that make up Dream, comfort, memory reimagine the Canadian landscape through the haze of memory and nostalgia, creating a space that is at once personal and universally resonant. Tanya explains her process as follows:

In the last five years, there has been a huge shift in my art making process. A move from downtown Toronto to a more rural setting brought about an unexpected change of subject matter. Suddenly I found myself wanting to interpret an open field instead of a tightly knit grid.  My palette brightened. It has been a time of experimentation for me. Relying heavily on collage in the past, I ventured into oil paint and linen again for the first time in over a decade. After years of abstraction, I felt like I was just learning to hold a brush again. 

I have always created work in response to my current surroundings, but the underlying theme remains the passage of time, memory, and personal nostalgia. In this vein, my work often acts as a visual diary for personal and significant events in my life. Last summer, while on a camping trip North of Sudbury, I became overwhelmed by memories of my childhood. Born in Kirkland Lake but raised in Southern Ontario, we would return North to my grandparents’ cottage, vacationing there each summer. As a child, it was two glorious carefree weeks of swimming, roasting marshmallows and staying up late with my cousins. Now, as I start my own family, I find myself trying to recreate the idyllic simple days of my youth for my own son.  

The title for Dream, comfort, memory is borrowed from Neil Young’s Helpless, a song that always makes me think of my Dad and his formative years up North. Visually, I enjoyed finding various levels of abstraction and representation within the dramatic rock cliffs and sparsely treed terrain of the North. But very specifically, more than just paintings of landscape, Dream, comfort, memory embodies the importance of family, the preservation of tradition, and the fleeting nature of time.

 

J. Lynn Campbell Soliloquy

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September 15 – October 7, 2018

Opening Reception: Saturday September 15,  2-5 PM

 Loop Gallery is proud to present Soliloquy, an exhibition of new work by J. Lynn Campbell. 

As J. Lynn Campbell worked on the pieces in this exhibition, one word kept coming up: soliloquy. Exactly! For while the making of art may be a solo pursuit and reflection – it is no mere monologue. The soliloquy, as a dramatic device, allows the thoughts and motives of its speaker to be known to the audience. An exhibition – at its best – is similarly revelatory of the thoughts of the artist. For both the dramatist and the artist, an exploration of metaphor and material is the road toward meaning.

The most renowned of soliloquys is, of course, Hamlet’s. Its existential and political questions have rarely had more relevance than in our particular historic times. Campbell found that reflections on world events led to questions for which there are few obvious answers. And so, this work began in a context evocative of the tragically reflective Danish prince. Not knowing what she had to say, or how to say it.

Still, in the midst of uncertainty, action remains essential. While thought is never absent in making work or making sense of our world, Campbell found that her exploration of materials set thoughts on new trajectories and both thoughts and materials evolved as she worked.

The artist takes up her chosen forms and shapes, combines and juxtaposes them, to invoke meaning for herself and for us. As viewers, we reflect on these intersections in our own meaning-making. The works in this show address the fundamental fear and solace of the natural world – of which we are a part – and the oft-tragic beauty of our desire to make our place in it. 

— Joyce Mason

About the Artist

J. Lynn Campbell is a Toronto-based artist who trained at the Ontario College of Art (now OCADU), with independent studies in France, Humanities at the University of Toronto, and Philosophy at York University. Her practice extends from two-dimensional collage to three-dimensional construction and site-specific installation. She has exhibited in Canada, Italy and Germany. Her work is included in private, public, and corporate collections.