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In Progress: New paintings by Alistair Magee and Mark Adair

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August 22 – 26

Reception: Saturday,  August 25, 2-5 PM


Loop is proud to present In Progress, a brief look behind the creative curtain at two veteran artists’ search for new modes of expression. In their own words:

 The paintings included in this exhibition at Loop are part of a new area of investigation. Fragments of transferred images from magazines, found notes, newspapers, letters and drawings operate as discrete temporal artifacts that preserve the flow of real time. Motifs are mirrored, rotated, repeated. Conjuring up remembered experience (personal, political, historical) they merge with mark making to suggest possible new relationships.

 I intend that my work should transcend painterly formalism and come loaded with personal and political undercurrents. Surface-matter and subject-matter should work in conjunction with one another in a dialectical tension, neither taking precedence. This exhibition gives me the opportunity to assess the progress of these new paintings.

Alistair Magee

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 All of the pictures in this show are ‘political,’ but the oil paintings are especially so. They reflect a deep anxiety about the gaps between our political leadership and what might be called the best advice given for how to address climate change. Why such a huge gap? Harvest Time (1983) was the last time I picked up the brushes, and that was also a ‘political’ picture. I, like most sane people of the day, was worried about the bombs. 

I have to point out that, for me, the choice of medium or method is driven by the depth of the compulsion involved. If I don’t feel passionate about it, I do something else. I don’t consider myself a painter. I do consider myself an artist. But a year or so ago I had this non-stop-won’t leave-me-alone-for-a-minute hankering to start painting a new sequence of the Death Drinks series, and it turned into this peering into the dark thickets to see what was going on in there. 

 Things seem to keep pulling at us, making us do absolutely crazy things, and we seem so utterly powerless to resist — to set ourselves on a common course, far, far away from the current divisive discourse that is nothing but a distraction from the work that needs doing.

— Mark Adair

 

Sheryl Dudley The Sea Was Never Blue

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July 21 – August 12, 2018

Opening Reception: July 21, 2018

 

Loop Gallery is proud to present The Sea Was Never Blue, an exhibition of new work by Sheryl Dudley. In the artist’s own words:

“The series began as an attempt to record incidental moments — a ray of sunlight piercing a kitchen window, clouds casting shadows across tall buildings. Too ephemeral to capture, these moments nonetheless remain embedded in memory, taking on a filmic quality that suggests the quivering shadows of trees or figures walking along a sidewalk.

Such moments are the inspiration that drove The Sea Was Never Blue.

The  fluidity and weightlessness of ink in this series offer a way of apprehending images that draw on sensation, holding still for a moment that which is fleeting and fugitive all around us.”

Sheryl Dudley is a longstanding member of Loop Gallery who has exhibited extensively, both within Canada and internationally. Visit http://www.sheryldudley.com to learn more. 

The Sea Was Never Blue will be on display at Loop Gallery between July 21 and August 12, 2018. For media inquiries please contact Tim Welsh at 416-516-2581 or email tim@loopgallery.ca.

Kelly Cade BioIntervals

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July 21 – August 12, 2018

Opening Reception: July 21,  2 – 5 PM

 

 BioIntervals is a continuation of Kelly Cade’s practice of abstracting photographic images to create new landscapes. These new works are intended to be points of entry into the quandary of measurement and meaning, and to underline the invented nature of such paracosms.

BioIntervals explores the intersection of our created intervals — our systems of measurement — and how they shape our experience of nature. It examines how our impulse to measure, categorize and define the natural world may in fact dissociate us further from that which we are trying to understand. 

In these works, linear patterns reveal inscriptions of meaning that overcode what lies beneath. Iridescent circles reflect our attraction to distraction, and our attraction to measurement as a system with its own internal logic.

These random geometric interventions of curved trajectories allow for a constantly shifting focus, suggesting a new dimension for inward and outward telescopings, as we continually search for meaning and place.

Kelly Cade is a visual artist working in a range of media, from painting and photography to installations. She is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design and has exhibited in both solo and group shows. Her work can be found in private and public collections throughout Canada, the U.S., Australia and the U.K.

kipjones second nature facsimile

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June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23, 2 – 5 PM

 

 “Doppelgangers as reflections of the strong discordance of modernity as it speaks to our involvement with nature”

 -Hillel Schwartz: The culture of the copy:Striking likenesses, unreasonable facsimiles.New York. Zone Books, 1996

 

The works in second nature facsimile seek to address the troubling tensions between humans’ vision of nature and the natural in the quest to create a contemporary civilization. They are playful acts of research into the notions and process of the cast object as a facsimile or copy of an ideal. 

Through the use of a broad range of materials, the various elements that constitute each individual form create an inter-connected discourse between the objects. These works are statements that tell an integral story of the interaction with the natural. This relationship is examined through familiar icons such as cast iron house frameworks, which refer to the planet as a place where we live. 

The works in second natural facsimile are intended as acts of engagement that create descriptive narratives, pushing the limits of multiples through the use of process and materiality. 

About the Artist

kipjones is an active and experienced public artist, sculptor and instructor living in Toronto. Over the past two decades, he has created public and studio-based works addressing various issues related to the critical and conceptual discourse of contemporary three-dimensionality. More specifically, he believes sculpture to be an open genre that speaks to space as a societal dimension, gesture as an action or event, and time as a response or reflection.

In his artistic research, kipjones addresses this complexity of space via immersive, site-specific installations, public art and object-making. Solo and co-designed permanent public art projects are installed at the Calgary International Airport, Moncton City Hall, Kelowna Public Library, King’s Square in Charlottetown, PEI, and the Markham Museum. 

 

Adrian Fish The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation

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June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23rd, 2 – 5 PM

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (commonly known as UAVs or drones) are a relatively new technology in a nascent stage of development. The ability to accurately maneuver a camera at high altitudes to inexpensively produce high-quality photographic imagery is a remarkably powerful technological development. The ability of UAVs to operate from these elevated perspectives – well above those previously made possible by stands, booms, scaffolds or tripods – invites many new subject explorations. 

My research interest is in building an archive of UAV images and videos that document the edges of urban/built environments. The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation is an exploration of the physical framework of the roads, buildings, intersections and parking lots of contemporary urban territory mingling with natural environments.

The images are presented on screens as moving stills – short video loops that offer insight into the organizations and patterns of the framework of urbanity. My intention is to insert UAV-generated material into the public sphere for contemplation and critical reflection on the impact and aesthetics of urban development.

About the Artist

Adrian Fish is a Toronto-born photo-based artist and educator currently living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Adrian holds an MFA from York University in Toronto, as well as undergraduate accreditation from OCAD University in Toronto and the Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, ON. His work has shown numerous public institutions, artist-run centres and commercial galleries in Calgary, Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Winnipeg in Canada, as well as internationally in Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn and Chelsea, NY, Columbus, OH, Berlin, Germany, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Tokyo, Japan. 

Adrian’s work has been featured in publications such as Canadian Art, Vice Magazine and WIRED.com. Adrian is currently Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Media Arts at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.