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Suzanne Nacha Interior Geometry

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December 31, 2016 – January 22, 2017

Reception: Saturday, January 7, 2017

Inspired by industrial landscapes, Nacha’s animation works present seamlessly looped, staged scenarios. Viewed in ceramic boxes, these animated vignettes appear as windows onto other worlds. Their moving geometries play with the viewer’s perception – successfully conveying mood and offering a unique visual experience. While animations take their inspiration from the landscapes of industry, screen prints and oval format paintings draw on her background in the geological sciences. Conflating the standard pictorial formats of landscape and portrait—anthropomorphism of geological strata and references to historical portraiture cleverly combine to create absurd and ominous narratives. Further enriched by her use of complex color, knowledge of structural geology and studied shadow play, these paintings and prints put forward an existential narrative—one that illuminates our ‘earth → man → machine’ trajectory and relationship to geologic time.

Suzanne Nacha is an artist working in painting, sculpture, installation and video. Her work is imbued with a unique visual language enriched by her experiences mapping the far-reaches of Canada, creating geologic maps that span the earth’s continents and the study of structural geology. She has exhibited her artwork in Canada, the United States and Europe and is represented in public and private collections, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, the National Bank of Canada, The Donovan Collection and the Robert McLaughlin Gallery. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, she holds degrees in both Fine Art and Geology. She has taught in the Fine Art departments of OCAD, Sheridan/UTM and York University, and for the past fifteen years has worked in the geological sciences mapping geographies of fortune and need.

For more information, visit www.suzannenacha.com.

Libby Hague Pattern Recognition

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December 31, 2016 – January  22, 2017

Reception: Saturday January 7, 2-5 PM

Playdate: Sunday, January 15, 1-4 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Libby Hague. 

I see Loop Gallery as an experimental space. This exhibition has two experimental installations—one visual and the other audio visual.

How much is too much? You begin with one object, then add another. At a certain point, our minds rebel at having to hold it all together. Nevertheless you add one more thing and wondrously, a release comes, everything fuses and becomes one variegated pattern with a quiet visual buzz on which that one new addition sits, a resting spot in a noisy world.

To explore this edge of excess, I am relying on the safety net of structure; it is not a precise grid, but an intuitively felt one that I hope viewers will also sense—something to make me feel brave and viewers reassured—something to connect us to a subtly comprehensible world that allows me to build complexity.

In a spirit of free invention, I’ve also begun a series of experiments with the potential of some of the structural components to make sounds. These sounds are much simpler than those made by traditional instruments, but the objects are very curious and less daunting. Everything will flow from the viewer’s decision to reach out and touch something. When explored by careful people, it should be at least interesting. If anyone is actually musical, I hope something more will emerge.

Libby Hague, RCA, (BFA Honours, Concordia University, (SGWU) Montreal)

Thematically, Libby Hague’s work examines humane and complex social relationships in a precarious and interconnected world. Her concerns, curiosity and love of invention have led her to a hybrid practice of printmaking, installation and animation.

Her recent solo exhibitions include the Idea Exchange, Cambridge; Centre Clark, Montreal; the Art Gallery of Ontario; YYZ artist’s outlet, Toronto; and the Art Gallery of Mississauga. Recent group exhibitions include Habitat: Our World; our chance, Harbourfront; Build…build better, Zion Schoolhouse and All that glows, AGNS. She lives and works in Toronto, Canada.

For more information, please visit www.libbyhague.com or contact Kelly McKenzie, Gallery Manager.

loop elsewhere December Edition

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banner_tryptic2 details of images: Maria Gabankova, Sandra Gregson, Jane Lowbeer and Tanya Cunnington

TANYA CUNNINGTON

Tanya is the owner and director of Lee Contemporary Art, a gallery in Orillia, an hour and a half north of Toronto. The annual Christmas Exhibition opens December 1 – 24.   If Only I’d Received Art For Christmas II  features work from Tanya as well as local artists Bewabon Shilling, Alex Richardson, Samantha Vessios, and her mom Annie Kmyta Cunnington.  All artwork is priced at $100 or less, and the opening night reception is Thursday Dec 1 from 7-9 pm.

Lee Contemporary Art
5 Peter Street South, Upper Level
Orillia, ON, L3V 5A8
705.331.3145
www.leecontemporaryart.ca

MARIA GABANKOVA

Maria invites you to an exhibition from the series New World Order, Book of Revelation and Residents/Dissidents
at  THE CONTEXT (program with Lorna Dueck) at the CBC Building (downtown Toronto)
enter at 205 Wellington St. (at John St.), walk straight ahead, it is the second door on your right.
Tuesday, Dec 6, 2016, 10 am to 4 pm
Monday, Dec 12, 2016,  10 am to 4 pm
Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016, 10 am to 8 pm  – artist wil be present 4 pm to 8 pm
For any inquiries please call: 416 535 8063

SANDRA GREGSON

Sandra’s work, in collaboration with Gary Spearin, continues until January 8, 2017.  Sandra is exhibiting a 4 metre tall tree made of terra cotta plant pots at 12 TREES: GOOD FOR THE EARTH curated by David Buckland at the Gardiner Museum in Toronto. http://www.gardinermuseum.on.ca/exhibitions/upcoming/12-trees-2016

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s work in Local Colour, a group show at the Art Gallery of Peterborough continues until Jan 8th, 2017.

http://agp.on.ca

ESTER PUGLIESE

Ester has work in the exhibition Glimpse at Station Gallery in Whitby, on view December 3, 2016 – January 29, 2016.
Juried by Kelly McCray, Steven Schwartz and Shelagh Stewart, the exhibition will catch sight of the fast paced world we live in. From a glance to a peek and a peep, Glimpse is sure to delight.
All are welcome to attend the opening reception on Thursday, December 8, beginning at 7 pm. Parking spaces at the gallery are limited, additional parking is available at Iroquois Park or the Whitby GO Station—all in walking distance to the gallery.

Gallery Hours:
Monday – Friday 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Thursdays  10:00 am – 9:00 pm
Saturday & Sunday  noon – 4:00 pm
Station Gallery
1450 Henry Street, Whitby, Ontario L1N 0A8
905-668-4185
art@whitbystationgallery.com
http://www.whitbystationgallery.com

also ESTER is participating in the group show Keepers, at Forest City Gallery in London, Ontario, running Friday, December 2, 2016 to Tuesday, December 13, 2016This is Forest City Gallery’s biggest fundraiser of the year, featuring works priced between $20 and $500. Attend the opening reception on December 2nd from 6 – 10 PM to get first picks of the show.

Confirmed artists to date : Tyler Armstrong . Megan Arnold . Simon Bentley . David Bobier . Derek Boswell . Parker Branch . Jeremy Brunnel . Lucas Cabral . Heather Carey . Emily Clark . Lynette de Montreuil . Jason Deary . Colin Muir Dorward . Cory Downing . Tyler Durbano . Liza Eurich . Kim Ewin-Goebel . Duncan Ferguson . Jake Freeman . Adam Giroux . Sky Glabush . Jennifer Hamilton . Antony Hare . Charlotte Hegele . Patrick Howlett . Tiffany Hufta . Kelly Jazvac . Bryan Jesney . James Kirkpatrick . Neil Klassen . Mack Ludlow . Owen Marshall . Conan Masterson . Zoë Mpeletzikas . Sarah Munro . Christine Negus . Kim Neudorf . Victoria Parker . Jenna Faye Powell . Ester Pugliese . Leslie Putnam . Angie Quick . Krista Reimer . Karalyn Reuben . Adam Revington . Ben Robinson .Rima Sater . Claire Scherzinger . Ruth Skinner . Jill Smith . Gabriella Solti . Mark Stebbins . Helen Thompson . Luke van H . Charles Vincent . Abby Vincent . Andrew Wyton . Thea Yabut . Billy Bert YoungGallery Hours:
Wednesday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Thursday: 12:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Friday & Saturday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Forest City Gallery
258 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6B 2H7
(519) 434-5875
info@forestcitygallery.com
http://www.forestcitygallery.com/

a visit with Ava Roth

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What process bridges the different mediums you work in?

Until I turned my attention to encaustic several years ago, all of my work was connected by a single endeavor: to use traditionally female, and often impermanent, materials in new and unconventional ways. Whether embroidering, making cake art, carving jewelry or working with textiles, I have been motivated by a connection to and conversation with other women, across different times and cultures. My turning to encaustic represented a conscious change, a 180 degree turn away from the materials that women have always had their hands on, and towards a world of blow-torches, toxicity, larger scale works, and lack of control. Interestingly enough, I have spent the last year coming full circle. My current body work is a collection of ‘sewn encaustic paintings’; I’m using an awl to push tiny threads into the wax, evoking stitched fabric, or needlework.

 

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How does having your dogs in the studio effect your work and your practice?

My dogs love to sleep on the warm floor of my studio, and always keep me company while I’m working. Occasionally this is challenging. My Great Dane has knocked over several paintings, and my bulldog likes to sleep underfoot while I am handling a blowtorch. (His white fur is currently dappled with indigo wax.) Despite these inconveniences, working with my dogs means more to me than just having some company in my studio. Having Thunder and Panda with me while I make art makes me feel like my creativity is intimately connected to my life as a whole. This holistic connection with my life is essential to my work.

 

 

 

 

 

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Besides your dogs, what else keeps you company in the studio?

I always listen to music when I’m working. Good music helps me turn off the left-side of my brain, and encourages me to rely on non-verbal, non-logical information to guide my process.

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What contemporary artists have influenced your work?

I tend to be most influenced by artists who are focused on a small and intimate project, those who work in traditionally female materials, and/or anyone engaged in creating temporary art. For example, there is an American wood-worker by the name of Josh Vogel, who crafts the most beautiful wooden spoons imaginable, transforming this ordinary utensil into lovingly rendered sculptures that are still absolutely functional. Toronto-based artist Laura Carwardine is another example – her gigantic cross-stich installation at Patria restaurant, is deeply inspiring to me. I’m often influenced by artists whose names we don’t know – ranging from the shibori textiles made by women in Japan, to beadwork on Inuit coats, to ancient Jewish wedding contracts, called ketubahs, which were traditionally painted and hung in homes.

 

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How do you know when a work is done?

I hate this response, it sounds so trite, but I just do! I have rarely, in all my life of making things, not known when a piece of work was done.

 

 

Thanks Ava for the visit!

to see more of Ava’s work check out: http://www.avaroth.ca

 

 

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John Ide Drawings 2B

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December 3 -23, 2016

Reception: December 3, 2-5 PM

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Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist John Ide. 

In this new series of drawings, thousands of cross hatched lines make patterns of dark and light that rise and fall, like breath. “Everything I do to the paper changes the paper,” Ide says. “The marks themselves—some of them hold bits of the graphite, some release it. As the drawing is being built over time white lines begin appearing, as if the paper has remembered where a line was before.”

The tools are simple: 2B pencil, colour pastel, and Stonehenge paper.

The drawings are striking for a gentle but uncompromising quality, their rich texture lost in reproduction, especially online. You have to see the works in person… [to] see not just fields of dark and light, but the impressions of the layers of cross hatching that went before. 

Maria Meindl, bodylanguagejournal.wordpress.com

A wide range of sources inspire the works: a flash of flame on a wood-fired bowl, faded frayed fabrics, billowing clouds, a leaf drifting. Suggestions of screens sometimes emerge, highlighting perhaps in this age of facsimile, the dynamic forces as they play with our notions of what’s real, what’s not.

John Ide is a Toronto-based artist who has exhibited widely. Having created filmic works earlier in his career, he returned to drawing in the mid-2000s. Recent exhibitions include Time, Shadow, and Light at the Glenhyrst Art Gallery of Brant and Magritte’s Cloud at Loop Gallery.

Sheryl Dudley Field Notes

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December 3 – 23, 2016

Reception: December 3, 2-5 PM

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After several previous bodies of work that explore family history as far back as the American Civil War, Sheryl Dudley jumps forward to her own childhood in the 1950’s, U.S.A. – a time punctuated by the looming threat of the atom bomb, duck & cover exercises and fallout shelters. She expresses this period in a series of visually abstracted metaphors of a remembered state of mind.

“Field Notes” refers to a gully in a forgotten strip of land a few miles long with a stream running through – a place where summers were spent gathering materials and building forts. It grew like a shantytown and periodically workers were sent in to clear away the ‘debris’. Structures were made up of all kinds of found materials: cast-off cardboards and ‘skids’ from a dumpster behind the supermarket, or lumber and corrugated metal from nearby building sites. A stash of old storm windows found in a basement and dragged down to the gully was meant to be the castle but proved too rickety to inhabit. Another made of steel mesh stretched out into a full circle with wildflowers and tall grasses woven through the openings became the most memorable for its fragrance and filtered light.

Several decades later a shopper reaches down to pick up her bag set below a magazine rack and notices something the Indigo team has missed. A sticky substance smeared across the bottom shelf – more than likely a soft drink knocked over and abandoned. Eventually a magazine carelessly tossed down on top of the spill stuck. Two years later, only a ghost of it remains plastered to the bottom ledge – an ambiguous residue of its back cover.

Could there possibly be a subject more banal? It is what we make of things that interest the artist: a bit of trash stuck to a shelf triggers a memory. Vivid imaginings take hold and it becomes greater than a recollection by morphing into a specific time and place. And then a gang of neighborhood kids appears and they start rummaging through backyards and garbage bins for stuff for building and invention. And so, while an idea for a new project springs to mind that takes her way back in time, the final result looks nothing at all like the past. As shadows flit in the night, memory is an elusive construct, often ending up resting in an un-nameable place and time.

loop elsewhere

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detail image credits: Tara Cooper and Jen Law, Mindy Yan Miller, Maria Gabankova

 

YAEL BROTMAN

Yael has been invited to participate in the Paperhouse Studio Residency at the Artscape Youngplace Centre for the month of November.
Her project, using paper pulp, will culminate in a group exhibition opening Feb. 14, 2017.

TARA COOPER AND JENN LAW 

Please join the artists for the launch of the Printopolis publication, edited by Tara and Jenn, on Friday, November 25th at 6:30 pm at Open Studio (104-401 Richmond Street West, Toronto). The Printopolis publication focuses on critical discourse surrounding the current state of printmaking in Toronto and further afield. Inspired by the 2010 print symposium hosted by Toronto’s Open Studio, one of Canada’s leading artist-run print centres (established in 1970), the volume considers contemporary print culture from a range of perspectives – collecting, material artifacts and the archive, pedagogy, print technologies, repetition, social activism and intervention, and public space. It also includes essays reflecting on Open Studio’s 45-year history, as well as artist pages specifically designed for the publication.

For further information, please visit the Open Studio web-site: http://openstudio.ca/printopolis-publication-now-available/

MARIA GABANKOVA

Maria is preparing a selection of  work for display from November 21, 2016 through February 2017 at The Context Exhibition Space, located inside the Canadian Broadcasting Centre (entrance at 205 Wellington St., Toronto), tel. 416 599 9777, email info@contextwithlornadueck.com.
Open 9 am – 5 pm on weekdays.
The concepts of works selected will relate to some of the issues of current events that Context programs speak out on. You can view Maria’s work at www.paintinggallery.ca

 

SANDRA GREGSON

In collaboration with Gary Spearin, Sandra will be exhibiting a 4 metre tall tree made of terra cotta plant pots at 12 TREES: GOOD FOR THE EARTH at the Gardiner Museum in Toronto. The show opens November 18 and continues until January 8, 2017.

 

LIBBY HAGUE

Libby’s work is included in the  print exhibition,  A Little Bit of Infinity at the University of Alberta Museums Galleries and also another U of A print initiative in Kyoto called Kyoto Hanga. Loop member YAEL BROTMAN is also exhibiting in the Kyoto show. http://www.kyotohanga.com/

DAVID HOLT

David will be leading a summer studio art workshop for practicing artists in Orvieto, Italy, focusing on art and religion. The workshop will run from June 18 to July 15, 2017 and will take advantage of the area’s rich historical tradition of religious material culture from its Etruscan origins onward.
Graduate level university credit available. More information and to find out how to participate visit http://www.icscanada.edu/art_in_orvieto/workshops

 

JANE LOWBEER

Jane is participating in Local Colour, a group show at the Art Gallery of Peterborough
Nov.17 –Jan.8

 

MINDY YAN MILLER

Mindy has been selected to participate in Fibreworks, a biennial juried exhibition of contemporary Canadian fibre art. It is a showcase of the most current and versatile approaches to fibre as a medium. This exhibition is one of the largest group shows in Canada and serves as a survey of the artists currently working in the medium. All works selected for the exhibition are eligible for the Juror’s award and may be purchased by Idea Exchange as part of its permanent collection dedicated exclusively to Canadian fibre art.
Fibreworks 2016 is juried by Sarah Quinton,  Artist/Curatorial Director, Textile Museum of Canada (Toronto, ON) and Jaime Angelopoulos, Artist (Toronto, ON). This year, the jury received submissions from 194 artists from across Canada, after a thorough selection process 15 artists were selected for exhibition.
Selected artists include: Ruth Adler (Toronto, ON), Susan Avishai (Toronto, ON), Audrey D’Astous (North York, ON), Stephanie Deumer, (Oakville, ON / Los Angeles, CA, USA), Risa Horowitz (Regina, SK), Deborah Margo (Ottawa, ON), Andrew McPhail (Hamilton, ON), Kristin Nelson (Winnipeg, MB), Samantha Pedicelli (Toronto, ON), Brenda Raynard (Edmonton, AB), Shannon Scanlan (Toronto, ON), Kelly Thompson (Montreal, QC), Karen Trask (Montreal, QC), Matthew Varey (Toronto, ON), Mindy Yan Miller (Saskatoon, SK).  https://ideaexchange.org/art/exhibition/fibreworks-2016

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J. Lynn Campbell Witness

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November 5 -27, 2016

Reception: November 5, 3-6 PM

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We are all actors and witnesses in the event called our lives – each life intersecting with, being shaped by and shaping those of others.

Today, the breadth of our connections – both direct and mediated – can be overwhelming in itself. Meanwhile, reports from far and wide unrelentingly offer views of mounting conflicts, prolonged wars, political polarizations, renewed xenophobia and the juggernaut of climate-change. The cumulative impact can be simply staggering.

Is it part of the human condition: to create the very circumstances that threaten us? to feel responsible yet powerless to shape a positive shared future? Certainly,

our efforts can feel intensely inadequate.

Still, as an artist and a Canadian, J. Lynn Campbell has had many opportunities for transforming, even transcending, the life and circumstances into which she was born. And though this is a privilege little-known to many, all people can choose whether and how they will honour life and, for her, it is in the honouring itself, that beauty is found and hope revived.

The works on view in Witness are drawn from several years of a practice in which Campbell strives to bear witness to her life and the shared human desire for connection, meaning and hope.

Passage, Earthly Paradise, and excerpts from Offering bear witness to these states.

Through the conception and the making of these pieces, J. Lynn Campbell claims, interprets and layers fragments from that which matters to her when faced with the complexities of life’s shifting realities. This can be a reminder that meaning is not found but made.

J. Lynn Campbell is a Toronto-based artist who trained at the Ontario College of Art (now OCADU), with independent studies in France, Humanities at the University of Toronto, and Philosophy at York University. Her practice extends from two-dimensional collage to three-dimensional construction and site-specific installation. She has exhibited in Canada, Italy and Germany. Her work is included in private, public, and corporate collections.

Jenn Law Extant

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November 5 – 27, 2016

Reception: November 5, 3 – 6 PMlaw-extant_loop_invite-2016

An object uncopied is under perpetual siege… 

—Hillel Schwartz 

Jenn Law’s multi-disciplinary practice explores the idea of the variable copy in relation to the historical archive/library and print-based strategies of preservation. In Extant, Law considers the legacies of three celebrated authors–Virgil, Emily Dickinson, and Franz Kafka–who requested in their wills that their unfinished works and/or their correspondence be burned upon their deaths. In each case, their work was spared and has gone on to inspire countless writers and readers. Here, Law has carefully hand-crafted imagined artifacts of these authors, seemingly rescued from the flames. Partially destroyed, the works revel in their salvation while prompting the viewer to contemplate the impact of their near-absence on the history of Western literature and culture. Each lithographed artifact blurs the boundary between the real and the imagined, the faithful forgery and the illusive original. Tapping into our angst over things left undone, Law deliberates on the will of the artist, literally and figuratively, pondering the delicate tipping point between annihilation and preservation, obscurity and immortality.

Accompanying these artifacts are a series of lithographed postcards of libraries—some are creatively altered replicas of vintage postcards, while others are invented by the artist from archival sources. Collectively alluding to the lost library of Alexandria, this ongoing series is modelled on early twentieth century ‘disaster’ postcards—with a contemporary twist. In a time when the targeted destruction of artworks, archaeological treasures, and historical monuments has become a weapon in the war against humanity, the image of material culture under siege has become more urgent and potent than ever. Ultimately, the extant artifact invites us to reflect on that which has been preserved for posterity while (impossibly) imagining what is irrevocably lost over the course of time.

Jenn Law is an artist, writer, and researcher living in Toronto. Law holds a PhD in Anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, England, a BA in Anthropology from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, and a BFA from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario. She has exhibited her art internationally and has worked as a lecturer, curator, and editor in Canada, the UK, and South Africa, publishing on South African, Caribbean, and Canadian contemporary art and print culture. Law has been the recipient of several awards and grants for her research including from SSHRC, the British Council, and the British Academy. She is the co-editor, with Tara Cooper, of Printopolis, published by Open Studio, Toronto in 2016.

5 Questions with Candida Girling

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If you missed Candida’s last show Shifting Landscapes, here’s a photo recap with a little behind the scenes Q&A called 5 questions with Candida Girling.

By Tara Cooper

What’s your elevator pitch for your current show?

“Shifting Landscapes explores the notion of the contemporary landscape in a world altered by human interaction”, to quote David Saric, who reviewed the show in ArtToronto.

What was your strategy for the install at Loop? Were there any challenges?  

I tried to position the works, which were in 3 media (ink drawings, wood that was engraved, carved and painted, and steel sculptures), in a way so that they spoke to each other. Ultimately, all of the works began with drawing and then brought to life through these different media. This was a relatively easy install, in contrast to some of my recent multi-media installations!

How do you spend your time when you’re not working in the studio?

Walking in the woods and the city, reading Italo Calvino, listening to music and practicing yoga.

What artist living or dead would you most like to have dinner with?  What would you order? What question would you ask him/her?

I would like to have a picnic lunch with the late Swiss artist Jean Tinguely and his wife Niki de Saint Phalle. We would dine in the garden of her sculpture park Giardino Tarocchi. I would also like to invite the late author Italo Calvino and contemporary artist and designer Olafur Eliasson, as he shares certain similar preoccupations. Using wit and ingenuity all of these artists question societal norms and ponder our relationship to history, nature and technology. They do this using elements drawn from the mundane and the absurd working them into compelling narratives. We would dine on pears and cheese, as well as edible plants that we would forage for. Wine would be served in goblets poured to varying heights and each person would have a set of spoons to play with. I would ask them for their strategies on dealing with the technological and societal changes in this new millennium.

What’s next in terms of your studio practice?

I would like to continue working with the media used in this show, exploring the same issues in more detail.

 

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