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Yael Brotman Time. Story. Tree

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February 25th  – March 19th, 2017

Reception: March 4th,  3 – 6 PM

Yael Brotman presents a new installation of work that contemplates raw material, process and universal stories that infuse our constructions and artifacts with poetry and truth.

In this exhibition, Brotman brings together various stages of creating, from the textural rubbings of bark of ancient trees on Haida Gwaii, to notation, documentation, translation from drawing to silkscreen, and transformation into three-dimensional structures.

In summer 2016, Brotman participated in a residency on Haida Gwaii, sponsored by Parks Canada and the Haida Gwaii Museum. She was struck by the legends she heard and read about Foamwoman and about eagles, ravens and turtles. There were marked parallels to the use of animals and birds in Western European tales; and the iconography of Foamwoman was remarkably similar to the multi-breasted Diana of Ephesus.

Brotman’s process is simplicity magnified into complexity. Basically she uses scissors and tape. Her drawings also embody the simplest of approaches—direct rubbings. But there is a point of departure into contemporary technology, like the GPS used to find the culturally modified trees deep in the Haida forest, the use of the silkscreen printmaking process, and the use of Mylar as the substrate. In this way Brotman’smaterial and process meld time and tales.

Yael Brotman lives and works in Toronto. She has exhibited nationally at public galleries and artist-run centres, and internationally at museums, private galleries and university galleries. She has been awarded grants and attended artist residencies in numerous countries including China, Australia, Ireland, Scotland, and Haida Gwaii. Brotman has recently been chosen as an RCA elect, to be inducted in May 2017. She is a Lecturer at the University of Toronto Scarborough and is president of the board of CARFAC Ontario.

Kim Stanford You knocked my teeth out

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February 25th – March 19th, 2017

Reception:  March 4th, 3 – 6 PM

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Kim Stanford.

In the domestic realm, performance can feel like everything for those tasked with manufacturing and maintaining a cohesive, comfortable, and happy home and family.  We play the part through careful self censorship, sharing our meticulously constructed narratives over unedited truths.  But what happens when it all starts to fall apart?

In You knocked my teeth outStanford explores the weight of keeping a family together amid dysfunction.  Frustrated by the idyllic imperative of decorating porn, Stanford creates collage and sculpture which lay bare the psychic interiors of those impossibly tasked with the domestic fantasy. The emotional strain seeps through. Something is not quite right in the pieces’ appearance even as they suggest objects that make up the spaces in which we play out our lives.  Created to unsettle rather than placate, the pieces on display in You knocked my teeth out illustrate the psychological milieu of home and all those who inhabit it.

Stanford studied visual art at The Toronto School of Art (TSA) and OCADU, as well as critical social theory in her graduate degree at the University of Toronto.  Using common, often domestic items, she constructs absurd assemblages in order to open a conversation about the universal dialectic between the taken-for-granted and a search for meaning.

Rewind with Loop’s Jenn Law

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If you missed Jenn Law’s last exhibition at Loop titled Extant, here’s a rewind look with a behind-the-scenes Q&A.

By Tara Cooper

1. What’s your elevator pitch for your last show?

In Extant, I consider the legacies of three authors who requested that their unfinished works be burned upon their deaths, yet whose writings were ultimately spared. Through the creation of imagined artifacts on the brink of destruction, I reflect on that which has been irrevocably lost over the course of time.

2. What was your strategy for the install at Loop? Were there any challenges?

I find installing work a bit stressful usually – mostly because I dread the tediousness of all the measuring and levelling, etc. So this time I asked artist and woodworker extraordinaire, Leah Ataide, to help install my show and it was the easiest, most stress-free installation experience ever. I think I actually enjoyed it for once! The biggest challenge was the 3 plinth mounted plexi-frames. Superframe custom-designed and built the double-sided frames to allow my 3 Dickinson lithographic works to be viewed from both sides. The frames were mounted on the plinths with screws that had to be fastened with wing nuts from the inside of the plinth. This required that we lay the plinth on its side with the frame tentatively screwed in, and while Leah supported the frame, I crawled inside the plinths with a mini flashlight to secure the wingnuts. A little claustrophobic, but it all came together in the end!

3. How do you spend your time when you’re not working in the studio?

I spend a lot of time reading, but the line between research and pleasure is always blurred. When I’m not making art, I’m generally writing about it; a productive compliment to my material practice, which allows me to explore and work through ideas in a slightly different way (I am happiest when I am doing both!). I have young kids, so I do my best to balance work and deadlines with time spent with my family – it keeps me grounded, focused, and grateful for what I do. Travel is always a welcome chance to recharge and seek inspiration, and as a family we love to visit museums, book stores, botanical gardens, and nature reserves both locally and further afield. When I need to de-stress, a long walk in the ravine always does the trick – or singing with my girls at the top of our lungs in the car, our own version of “carpool karaoke”!

4. What artist living or dead would you most like to have dinner with? What would you order? What question would you ask him/her?

That’s a challenging question, as there are countless artists across hundreds of years whose brains I’d like to pick! But one of the first artists to spring to mind is Sol LeWitt. I have long been enamoured with LeWitt’s work, particularly his artist’s books and wall drawings, and his embrace of seriality, collaboration, and rule-driven repetitive gestures speak profoundly to me as a print-based artist. Last year I had the privilege of visiting LeWitt’s largest scribble drawing at the Albright Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo. It was his last commissioned work and took 8 weeks, 16 artists, and nearly 2,000 pencil leads to fill the three walls surrounding the Gallery’s central staircase with 2,200 square feet of carefully prescribed scribbles. It is one of the most beautiful works I have ever seen. But LeWitt was also known for his humility and munificence and regularly traded work with both emerging and established artists. It is this generosity of spirit and interest in the exchange of work and ideas that would make LeWitt the ideal dinner guest. I would invite my closest artist friends to join us for dinner at my home, and we would drink wine and collectively make a feast of Italian food inspired by LeWitt’s years living in Spoleto, Italy. I would ask him about his time there, the influence of Italian wall painting traditions on his practice, and his favourite pieces from his own vast collection of artworks. After dinner, we would sip sweet vermouth and I would pass out graphite pencils, inviting everyone to scribble on the walls…

5. What’s next in terms of your studio practice?

I am presently working on two artist books, based on two of the series exhibited in this exhibition. The first is a book of poems created from Kafka’s Blue Octavo Notebooks (six pages of which were framed as individual pages for this show). The second book is a reflection on the ancient Library of Alexandria, from which the postcard pieces in the exhibition emerged. I am very excited to be creating works in book form and hope to jump back full-steam into my work and research in the coming months!

FEBRUARY EDITION

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image detail: Libby Hague, Tokyo baby, 15.5 x 20.5 in. woodcut, collage, dotted dots (acrylic)

 

YAEL BROTMAN AND LIBBY HAGUE

Yael and Libby have work in Fabrications at the Kelowna Art Gallery. The opening is February 3rd, 7 – 9pm with a Panel Discussion on February 4th from 2 – 4pm. The exhibition runs until April 16, 2017.
Includes an installation by Yael, Mountains Dance Like Rams, and also work by artists Gisele Amantea and Laura Vickerson. Curated by Liz Wylie.

Kelowna Art Gallery
1315 Water Street
www.kelownaartgallery.com

Yael and Libby are also featured in the International Print Exhibition: Canada and Japan, 2016 at the University of Alberta Museums. Curated by Liz Ingram and April Dean. [Previously exhibited at Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art and at Tokushima Museum of Modern Art] University of Alberta Museums Galleries at Enterprise Square1023 Jasper Avenue

University of Alberta, Edmonton AB
Feb.16 – March 25, 2017
Opening: February 26th

www.museums.ualberta.ca

and you can see Yael’s work in In House 2017,
a group exhibition of new works in collaboration with Paperhouse Studio.
Opens on February 24th with an Artists’ Panel Discussion at 6 p.m.
Works will be on view February 24 and 25th at Critical Distance Centre for Curators (CDCC), Suite 302
Artscape Youngplace
180 Shaw St., Suite 102, Toronto ON

J. LYNN CAMPBELL

Lynn is one of the artist featured in the Drawing 2017, John B. Aird Gallery’s 18th Annual Juried Exhibition. Showcasing drawing by contemporary Canadian artists. Exhibition runs February 7th until March 3rd. Opening Reception is February 9th, 6 – 8pm.

John Aird Gallery
Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street (at Wellesley), Toronto ON
Gallery Hours: Monday to Friday 10am to 6pm.
www.airdgallery.org

DAVID HOLT

David will be leading a summer studio art workshop for practicing artists in Orvieto, Italy, focusing on art and religion. The workshop will run from June 18 to July 15, 2017 and will take advantage of the area’s rich historical tradition of religious material culture from its Etruscan origins onward. Graduate level university credit available. More information and to find out how to participate visit http://www.icscanada.edu/art_in_orvieto/workshops

 

Elizabeth Babyn Plastopia

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January 28 – February 19, 2017

Reception: January 28, 3- 6 p.m.

 

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Elizabeth Babyn

In response to a world where oil-based materials have infiltrated so much of our consumer society, Babyn’s new installation entitled, Plastopia, represents a dystopian reality, composed of excessive amounts of plastic refuse, mirrored-Mylar and mutant-plastic creatures. Her Tsunami-Waterfall harnesses the seductive power of consumption with coloured strobing lights and reams of plastic wrap knotted onto a 16’ x 25’ chicken wire-structure, that offers beauty and enticement until the more sinister components of the “garbage” from which it is made, reveal themselves.

Along with a sci-fi video that features monstrous-plastic creatures, there are long lengths of mirrored-Mylar on both the floor and ceiling accompanying the sculptural pieces within Plastopia. The video reveals a surreal assemblage of random illogical sequences that appear both confusing and devoid of a comprehensive storyline. Babyn’s film and installation objects, symbolically repeat themselves as they obscenely fill the space through the use of mirror fragmentation; “never able to get rid of” the multiplying effects of overabundance and hyper-consumption. Considering that 315 billion tons of plastic become permanent fixtures within our oceans and waterways; this post-apocalyptic world reflects not only her own consumption excesses, but ones that also plague many of us within society today.

Babyn received her BFA with Honours in Drawing and Painting from the Ontario College of Art and Design University in 2005. She recently completed her MFA in 2016 at the University of Saskatchewan in sculpture and installation. She has been a Loop Gallery Member in Toronto since 2003. She has exhibited nationally and internationally. Her works can be found in public and private collections in both Canada and Europe.

For more information, visit www.elizabethbabyn.ca.

Ester Pugliese Measured Calm

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January 28 – February 19, 2017

Reception:  January 28, 3 – 6 p.m.

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist, Ester Pugliese.

Channeling diverse influences ranging from endangered species and cut flower arrangements, to children’s amusements and Italian folk music, Pugliese‘s new mixed media paintings capture the fleeting quality of life. By suffusing abstracted swathes of colour with carefully drawn details and a coral reef aesthetic, the works ask viewers to untangle dense layers and find relationships in seemingly disparate imagery. Geometric shapes resembling building blocks threaten to swallow carefully rendered details of plants, suggesting their likely demise through the agency of human progress. However, rather than obliterating the natural living things, these geometric shapes appear to be replicating themselves – learning how to grow alongside the natural world.

Measured Calm explores the relationship between the enjoyment evoked by the sensuous depiction of a subject and a conflicting moral message, a concept inspired by the still life, or “vanitas”, paintings of the Netherlands in the 16th and 17th centuries. This is akin to the artist’s breathless lust when she enters a flower shop and imagines composing an arrangement drawn from the exquisite living things contained within. With such an assortment of blooms – common, rare and possibly endangered – she must contain her desire to have them all. It seems that in today’s world, when we scrutinize our base, often materialistic, urges we inevitably confront our morals.

Ester Pugliese is a Toronto-based artist. She graduated from York University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Specialized Honours) in Visual Arts Studio. She spent a year studying abroad in Leeds, UK and has exhibited extensively in Ontario as well as in Leeds, UK. Pugliese has been the recipient of numerous awards and scholarships, and her work can be found in private and public collections in North America and Europe, including the Donovan Collection.

For more information, visit www.esterpugliese.com.

loop elsewhere JANUARY EDITION

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image details: Rochelle Rubinstein, Tara Cooper

 

TARA COOPER

Tara’s exhibition God Loves Brigus II opened January 6th at the Alberta Printmakers Gallery.
During a 3-week stay at Landfall Trust in Brigus, Newfoundland (http://www.landfalltrust.org/), Tara researched the history of the area and took note of the weather. She watched an iceberg slowly dissolve in the bay, learned about Captain Bob Bartlett, who was an arctic explorer that once brought a polar bear home to Brigus and met Ray, the caretaker of Landfall, who told her a story about his grandfather – a whaler that lost his life in an explosion at sea. Made in collaboration with Terry O’Neill, God Love Brigus compiles these experiences into a floating raft that mixes sculpture, print, sound and video.
Show runs until February 18th, 2017
Alberta Printmakers Gallery
4025 4th Street SE Calgary AB

ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

CYCLiC opens January 13th at Open Studio and runs until February 11, 2017.
Join Rochelle at the Opening Reception Friday January 13th from 6:30 – 8:30 PM.
Open Studio
George Gilmour Members’ Gallery
401 Richmond Street West
Suite 104
Toronto, ON
416 504 8238

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Suzanne Nacha Interior Geometry

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December 31, 2016 – January 22, 2017

Reception: Saturday, January 7, 2017

Inspired by industrial landscapes, Nacha’s animation works present seamlessly looped, staged scenarios. Viewed in ceramic boxes, these animated vignettes appear as windows onto other worlds. Their moving geometries play with the viewer’s perception – successfully conveying mood and offering a unique visual experience. While animations take their inspiration from the landscapes of industry, screen prints and oval format paintings draw on her background in the geological sciences. Conflating the standard pictorial formats of landscape and portrait—anthropomorphism of geological strata and references to historical portraiture cleverly combine to create absurd and ominous narratives. Further enriched by her use of complex color, knowledge of structural geology and studied shadow play, these paintings and prints put forward an existential narrative—one that illuminates our ‘earth → man → machine’ trajectory and relationship to geologic time.

Suzanne Nacha is an artist working in painting, sculpture, installation and video. Her work is imbued with a unique visual language enriched by her experiences mapping the far-reaches of Canada, creating geologic maps that span the earth’s continents and the study of structural geology. She has exhibited her artwork in Canada, the United States and Europe and is represented in public and private collections, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, the National Bank of Canada, The Donovan Collection and the Robert McLaughlin Gallery. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, she holds degrees in both Fine Art and Geology. She has taught in the Fine Art departments of OCAD, Sheridan/UTM and York University, and for the past fifteen years has worked in the geological sciences mapping geographies of fortune and need.

For more information, visit www.suzannenacha.com.

Libby Hague Pattern Recognition

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December 31, 2016 – January  22, 2017

Reception: Saturday January 7, 2-5 PM

Playdate: Sunday, January 15, 1-4 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Libby Hague. 

I see Loop Gallery as an experimental space. This exhibition has two experimental installations—one visual and the other audio visual.

How much is too much? You begin with one object, then add another. At a certain point, our minds rebel at having to hold it all together. Nevertheless you add one more thing and wondrously, a release comes, everything fuses and becomes one variegated pattern with a quiet visual buzz on which that one new addition sits, a resting spot in a noisy world.

To explore this edge of excess, I am relying on the safety net of structure; it is not a precise grid, but an intuitively felt one that I hope viewers will also sense—something to make me feel brave and viewers reassured—something to connect us to a subtly comprehensible world that allows me to build complexity.

In a spirit of free invention, I’ve also begun a series of experiments with the potential of some of the structural components to make sounds. These sounds are much simpler than those made by traditional instruments, but the objects are very curious and less daunting. Everything will flow from the viewer’s decision to reach out and touch something. When explored by careful people, it should be at least interesting. If anyone is actually musical, I hope something more will emerge.

Libby Hague, RCA, (BFA Honours, Concordia University, (SGWU) Montreal)

Thematically, Libby Hague’s work examines humane and complex social relationships in a precarious and interconnected world. Her concerns, curiosity and love of invention have led her to a hybrid practice of printmaking, installation and animation.

Her recent solo exhibitions include the Idea Exchange, Cambridge; Centre Clark, Montreal; the Art Gallery of Ontario; YYZ artist’s outlet, Toronto; and the Art Gallery of Mississauga. Recent group exhibitions include Habitat: Our World; our chance, Harbourfront; Build…build better, Zion Schoolhouse and All that glows, AGNS. She lives and works in Toronto, Canada.

For more information, please visit www.libbyhague.com or contact Kelly McKenzie, Gallery Manager.

loop elsewhere December Edition

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loop_elsewhere

banner_tryptic2 details of images: Maria Gabankova, Sandra Gregson, Jane Lowbeer and Tanya Cunnington

TANYA CUNNINGTON

Tanya is the owner and director of Lee Contemporary Art, a gallery in Orillia, an hour and a half north of Toronto. The annual Christmas Exhibition opens December 1 – 24.   If Only I’d Received Art For Christmas II  features work from Tanya as well as local artists Bewabon Shilling, Alex Richardson, Samantha Vessios, and her mom Annie Kmyta Cunnington.  All artwork is priced at $100 or less, and the opening night reception is Thursday Dec 1 from 7-9 pm.

Lee Contemporary Art
5 Peter Street South, Upper Level
Orillia, ON, L3V 5A8
705.331.3145
www.leecontemporaryart.ca

MARIA GABANKOVA

Maria invites you to an exhibition from the series New World Order, Book of Revelation and Residents/Dissidents
at  THE CONTEXT (program with Lorna Dueck) at the CBC Building (downtown Toronto)
enter at 205 Wellington St. (at John St.), walk straight ahead, it is the second door on your right.
Tuesday, Dec 6, 2016, 10 am to 4 pm
Monday, Dec 12, 2016,  10 am to 4 pm
Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016, 10 am to 8 pm  – artist wil be present 4 pm to 8 pm
For any inquiries please call: 416 535 8063

SANDRA GREGSON

Sandra’s work, in collaboration with Gary Spearin, continues until January 8, 2017.  Sandra is exhibiting a 4 metre tall tree made of terra cotta plant pots at 12 TREES: GOOD FOR THE EARTH curated by David Buckland at the Gardiner Museum in Toronto. http://www.gardinermuseum.on.ca/exhibitions/upcoming/12-trees-2016

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s work in Local Colour, a group show at the Art Gallery of Peterborough continues until Jan 8th, 2017.

http://agp.on.ca

ESTER PUGLIESE

Ester has work in the exhibition Glimpse at Station Gallery in Whitby, on view December 3, 2016 – January 29, 2016.
Juried by Kelly McCray, Steven Schwartz and Shelagh Stewart, the exhibition will catch sight of the fast paced world we live in. From a glance to a peek and a peep, Glimpse is sure to delight.
All are welcome to attend the opening reception on Thursday, December 8, beginning at 7 pm. Parking spaces at the gallery are limited, additional parking is available at Iroquois Park or the Whitby GO Station—all in walking distance to the gallery.

Gallery Hours:
Monday – Friday 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Thursdays  10:00 am – 9:00 pm
Saturday & Sunday  noon – 4:00 pm
Station Gallery
1450 Henry Street, Whitby, Ontario L1N 0A8
905-668-4185
art@whitbystationgallery.com
http://www.whitbystationgallery.com

also ESTER is participating in the group show Keepers, at Forest City Gallery in London, Ontario, running Friday, December 2, 2016 to Tuesday, December 13, 2016This is Forest City Gallery’s biggest fundraiser of the year, featuring works priced between $20 and $500. Attend the opening reception on December 2nd from 6 – 10 PM to get first picks of the show.

Confirmed artists to date : Tyler Armstrong . Megan Arnold . Simon Bentley . David Bobier . Derek Boswell . Parker Branch . Jeremy Brunnel . Lucas Cabral . Heather Carey . Emily Clark . Lynette de Montreuil . Jason Deary . Colin Muir Dorward . Cory Downing . Tyler Durbano . Liza Eurich . Kim Ewin-Goebel . Duncan Ferguson . Jake Freeman . Adam Giroux . Sky Glabush . Jennifer Hamilton . Antony Hare . Charlotte Hegele . Patrick Howlett . Tiffany Hufta . Kelly Jazvac . Bryan Jesney . James Kirkpatrick . Neil Klassen . Mack Ludlow . Owen Marshall . Conan Masterson . Zoë Mpeletzikas . Sarah Munro . Christine Negus . Kim Neudorf . Victoria Parker . Jenna Faye Powell . Ester Pugliese . Leslie Putnam . Angie Quick . Krista Reimer . Karalyn Reuben . Adam Revington . Ben Robinson .Rima Sater . Claire Scherzinger . Ruth Skinner . Jill Smith . Gabriella Solti . Mark Stebbins . Helen Thompson . Luke van H . Charles Vincent . Abby Vincent . Andrew Wyton . Thea Yabut . Billy Bert YoungGallery Hours:
Wednesday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Thursday: 12:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Friday & Saturday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Forest City Gallery
258 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6B 2H7
(519) 434-5875
info@forestcitygallery.com
http://www.forestcitygallery.com/