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Adrian Fish The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation

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June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23rd, 2 – 5 PM

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (commonly known as UAVs or drones) are a relatively new technology in a nascent stage of development. The ability to accurately maneuver a camera at high altitudes to inexpensively produce high-quality photographic imagery is a remarkably powerful technological development. The ability of UAVs to operate from these elevated perspectives – well above those previously made possible by stands, booms, scaffolds or tripods – invites many new subject explorations. 

My research interest is in building an archive of UAV images and videos that document the edges of urban/built environments. The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation is an exploration of the physical framework of the roads, buildings, intersections and parking lots of contemporary urban territory mingling with natural environments.

The images are presented on screens as moving stills – short video loops that offer insight into the organizations and patterns of the framework of urbanity. My intention is to insert UAV-generated material into the public sphere for contemplation and critical reflection on the impact and aesthetics of urban development.

About the Artist

Adrian Fish is a Toronto-born photo-based artist and educator currently living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Adrian holds an MFA from York University in Toronto, as well as undergraduate accreditation from OCAD University in Toronto and the Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, ON. His work has shown numerous public institutions, artist-run centres and commercial galleries in Calgary, Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Winnipeg in Canada, as well as internationally in Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn and Chelsea, NY, Columbus, OH, Berlin, Germany, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Tokyo, Japan. 

Adrian’s work has been featured in publications such as Canadian Art, Vice Magazine and WIRED.com. Adrian is currently Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Media Arts at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  

loop elsewhere SUMMER EDITION

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image: Jane Lowbeer, Small Things, found objects, 11″ x 4″, 2018

KELLY CADE

Last chance to catch Kelly’s exhibition at Hatch Gallery in Prince Edward County until June 15th, 2018. Gallery hours are Wednesday to Sunday – 11am to 5:00pm.

LIBBY HAGUE

The catalogue for INTERVENTION: 31 WOMEN PAINTERS,  the Montreal painting show at the McClure Gallery which was curated by Harold Klunder is now available from ABC Art Books. http://www.abcartbookscanada.com/

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s exhibition, Preponderance of the Small, will be at the Visual Art Centre of Clarington  from June 3 to July 1st.
Unusual gallery hours are 10am – 9pm Tuesday  to Thursday and 10am to 4pm Friday-Sunday. Jane will also be giving an Artist Talk on June 17th 2pm – 4pm.

AVA ROTH

Ava has a solo exhibition coming up, from July 6-August 25th, at the Agnes Jameison Gallery in Minden, ON. Opening reception is July 6th from 4:30 – 6pm. Layer Landscapes: Wax and Thread, explores the tension between permanent and temporary, solid and delicate and transparent and opaque.

John Ide What Paper Remembers

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May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 26, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is proud to present What Paper Remembers, a collection of new work by John Ide. In his own words:

“Earlier this year I was going through some old drawings and wondered what would happen if I erased some of them and reworked what was left. I’ve been erasing ever since, and redrawing based on what the paper remembers.

Erasing is part of my drawing process, inspired in large part by how much the printmaking paper I use refuses to “forget.” This random refusing to forget forces me to respond and I find the push-pull creatively stimulating.” 

What Paper Remembers continues Ide’s exploration of the connections between memory, history and the artistic process. Please join us on Sunday, May 27th from 2-5 p.m., as we celebrate the exhibition’s opening. 

John Ide is a longstanding loop member who has exhibited widely in Toronto and beyond. The preoccupation with personal and collective memory has been an ongoing theme in his work across disparate media. After years of installation-based work, Ide returned to drawing in 2006 and has continued to evolve his practice in the years since. 

Adrienne Trent The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature

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May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 27, 2 – 5  PM

 

 Popular culture revolves around the idea that actors, sets, spoken lines and special effects are not a constructed reality, shot frame-by-frame to enable the viewer to get lost in the plot, but rather reality itself. This creates a ‘false consciousness,’ based on ersatz representations which television and film makers intend for viewers. I began to pursue the idea of exploring this false, fabricated reality as the basis for an exhibition, particularly as it’s a subject I have close, first-hand knowledge of: I’ve worked in art departments in the Toronto film industry for the last 20 years.

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature includes a projected video loop consisting of a series of 3 minute videos. I filmed them while rustling trees and observing lighting and special effects on a successful, 4-season (so far) American TV series. At the beginning of Season 3, the executive producers informed me that some viewers had called to express a particular disturbance: during interior scenes, the trees which I’d placed outside the windows were not “moving in the breeze” and therefore “didn’t look real.” To solve this thorny problem, I was asked to shake the trees manually by tying filament to them and gently rustling them, during the brief takes in which a window with an exterior view was in the shot.

 

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature consists of footage of myself in the act of shaking the trees; I also caught on video a helium “moon” whose artificial light shone down onto a constructed waterfall, and a cozy living room, whose crackling fireplace flames up instantly thanks to a quick propane torch.

 

In addition to the projection, the administrative desk has been subjected to a process referred to in film as “breakdown.” This indicates the artificial aging of props, sets and costumes on a film set to emulate the time period in which the story takes place. Though I’ve worked on projects that span millennia, for the objects in this show I’ll limit history to the last ten years, a period not yet obsolete and dingy. The act of re-inscribing recent history on an object speaks to the central role this ‘false consciousness’ plays in the creative process. 

 

My film work has enabled me to experience a wide variety of projects and budgets. I’ve been hired onto multimillion dollar projects such as Pompeii, as well as many small independent films, and also union productions for notable directors such as Denis Villeneuve, Denys Arcand, Deepa Mehta, Bruce MacDonald, Don McKellar and zombie guru George Romero.

 

 

Libby Hague Wider than the sky

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April 28 – May 20, 2018

Opening Reception:  April 28, 2-5 PM

Artist Conversation: May 20, 3-5 PM

Wider than the sky is an exhibition of large woodcuts and a mixed media project by Libby Hague, produced enthusiastically in the OCADU Digital Painting Residency.

“My work examines complex social relationships in a precarious world. I feel that everything we value (ourselves, our relationships, our country, our planet) is fragile and we have to find a way not to be overwhelmed by the anger and noise around us and work together to find common ground.”

Wider than the sky uses the imagination to locate patterns that bring the vast macro and micro scales of science (the cosmos, DNA) together with text and objects, the daily gestures and concerns of a clamorous world. It’s like looking at the stars and thinking “Here I am, part of this in some small way.” It’s not a lonely thought; it connects us to an orderly universe – one growing infinitesimally more comprehensible – a comforting thought right now.

Rather than attempting to overwhelm the viewer, the artist leaves “breathing spaces” in these complex systems, breaks for perspective and attention, to reaffirm human values of kindness and consideration and let us listen to each other.

Libby Hague has a hybrid practice of printmaking and installation. Her recent exhibitions include The past is never over: a retrospective, Art Gallery of Mississauga; Inventing Hope, Idea Exchange, Ontario; Departures – Masterpieces of Canadian Printing, Ardell Gallery of Modern Art, Bangkok; Habitat, Harbourfront, Toronto.

Find Libby online at http://libbyhague.com/.

Tara Cooper On Sabbatical

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April 28 – May 20, 2018

Opening Reception: April 28, 2 – 5 PM

Artist Conversation: May 20,  3-4 PM

 

In Chasing the Perfect, Natalia Ilyin talks about going to grad school: how she imagined meditative walks in the woods and lots of time to think. But anyone who’s gone to grad school knows that this is not the case, that the reality has more commonalities with a marathon — something that pushes your physical and mental state.

Since January, I’ve been on sabbatical, and this show is a mash-up of what I’ve seen, done and thought. Being on sabbatical isn’t exactly a marathon, nor is it as fraught as grad school, but it’s also not the leisurely time imagined. There’s pressure to achieve, pressure to justify the privilege, and an overall undercurrent of urgency propelled by the knowledge that it will be years before the next one comes around.

On Sabbatical includes excerpts from an exhibition I had in January and one coming up this summer, drawings of an outdoor public artwork that will be installed this spring, the beginnings of a collaborative project with McGill University’s Redpath Museum (one of Canada’s oldest natural history museums), and some work I made on a residency at the Vermont Studio Center. It’s got a bit of the ‘what I did on my summer vacation’ vibe, but also offers a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the creative mess — the doubts, false starts and things that keep me going.

loop elsewhere SPRING EDITION

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                  detail from Elizabeth D’Agostino, Makeshift Tales, 2018

ELIZABETH D’AGOSTINO

Elizabeth’s new work Makeshift Tales opens April 20th at the Alberta Printmakers Gallery. It includes an essay by loop member JENN LAW, which you can read it here. Opening reception is April 20th from 7 pm – 9 pm -and the show runs until June 1st.

MARTHA ELEEN

Martha’s show Before Tomorrow opens at the Art Gallery of Bancroft and runs from May 2nd until May 26th.
Opening reception May 4th at 7:20 pm.
For more information visit: www.artgallerybancroft.ca

SANDRA GREGSON

Sandra is currently doing a two-month art residency at SIM (The Association of Icelandic Visual Artists) in Reykjavik, Iceland.

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s work is up until April 21st in the group show Revisiting the Landscape at Open Studio, 401 Richmond St. West, Toronto. Opening April 6th is, Periphery, an installation in the foyer of  StarX gallery in Peterborough, Ontario.

Also, opening June 3rd is a solo show of Jane’s work, Preponderance of the Small, at the Visual Art Centre Of Clarington (VAC)

Sandra Smirle Stellar Baby

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March 31 – April 22, 2018

Opening Reception Saturday, March 31, 2 – 5 PM

You are born with the boundless potential of all things, the potential to be all those things at once. Nothing is finite. Yours is a universe of possibilities; the whole universe is a possibility. You’re a star, baby. You’re all the stars. 

Only when you let slip being young will those countless simultaneous possibilities collapse into one — an aspect of an object, frozen in context — a plodding increment where once were quantum leaps and bounds. Just as a particle exists in two places unobserved, until an instance of mindful surveillance eradicates the odds.

But I have to watch, eyes on the opportunity horizon. Have to patrol the outer limitless, cradling my stellar heart. How long can I keep you holding the delicate balance, maintaining every possibility of all the things at once?

How long can I keep your balance? 

In her new series of work, Sandra Smirle uses video, photo, paper cutting and sculpture to continue exploring notions of seeing and being seen. Here, her gaze has shifted from a macro-picture to a micro-view — a place, in every sense, closer to home. As living and maturing in a rapidly changing world sends us pinging from pressure point to tension to perplexity, the need to grab hold and monitor the (domestic) situation seems like a natural response. This is surveillance in an older sense of watching over, or guardianship.

Stellar Baby casts us as the surveyor of a girl who is navigating all her possibilities, balancing the probabilities. With her head in the clouds, she is poised on the cusp of adulthood — her expanding potential remains unrealized, even as order threatens to impose a new reality, to reveal a singular course through her universe of chaos. We are invited to explore the distinctions between balance and imbalance, to contemplate how the smallest adjustment of equilibrium, the smallest structural change, can be a radical proposition with astronomical consequences — a defining act of observation.

About the Artist

Sandra Smirle is a multidisciplinary Canadian artist based in Montreal, who uses drawing, sculpture, paper cutting, photo, video, and installation, to explore ideas around surveillance, dataveillance and our ‘viewer society.’ Smirle’s work, which examines how new technologies impact the way we view our world suggests a survey of seeing and being seen — how we, in turn, are viewed by mechanisms designed to navigate our movements.

Smirle graduated with an MFA (2015) from Concordia University. Her work has been exhibited nationally as well as internationally, and is held in private and corporate collections in Canada, Australia, and Europe. Smirle has been a member of Loop Gallery in Toronto since 2010 and is part of the Montreal-based collective, Incubator for Phantom Pregnancies (IFPP), which debuted its first exhibition this spring and presented its first collaborative installation during this year’s 2018 Nuit Blanche in Montreal. Her work has been featured in The Map as Art: Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography, published by Princeton Architectural Press, as well as the Globe and Mail and The Toronto Star.

Linda Heffernan The Perpetuation of Memory

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March 31 – April 22, 2018

Opening reception March 31, 2 – 5 PM

loop Gallery is proud to present The Perpetuation of Memory, a new exhibition by Linda Heffernan. Continuing her practice of working with open source satellite imagery, and her preoccupation with the impact humans have on the natural world, Heffernan in this exhibition uses contemporary Google Earth images to recreate a series of First World War battle sites. Inspired partly by the upcoming centennial of the Armistice of November 11, 1918, the resulting images juxtapose the violence of war against impressionistic landscapes, commenting on the passage of time and the ultimate resiliency of nature.

Linda Heffernan is a Cobourg-based artist exploring themes of consumer capitalism and bureaucracy in an ever more interconnected global economy. She has a BFA from OCAD University and her work is included in private and public collections in Canada. Linda Heffernan has been a member of loop Gallery since 2006. She has exhibited her work in a number of galleries in Toronto’s Queen West district, as well as Whitby’s Station Gallery, The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, and the Northumberland Art Gallery.

Loop Gallery & Wellington Water Watchers Water Advisory!

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March 3 – 25, 2018

Exhibition Launch:  Sunday, March 4th – 1 PM

 

 

 

Just in time for Water Week (March 20 – 27) and World Water Day (March 22), Loop Gallery and Wellington Water Watchers are proud to announce WATER ADVISORY! Featuring work by Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, WATER ADVISORY! combines art and activism to explore the disconnect between society and the water that sustains it.

WATER ADVISORY! is an intersectional call to action that urges viewers to interrogate their own relationship to the natural world through banners, print, and mixed media installations. Exhibiting artists include Beehive Collective, Crystal Sinclair, Tannis Nielson, Claudia Wong, Sally Pang, Erika James, Carol Cheong, Paul Morin, Sarit Cantor, and more

WATER ADVISORY! launches on Sunday March 4 at 1 pm with a conversation with the artists, followed by a performance by hip-hop group Test Their Logik. The exhibition will be open to the public from 12-5 pm Wednesdays and Thursdays, 12-6 pm Fridays and Saturdays, and 1-4 pm on Sundays, until March 25. Educators wishing to arrange a classroom visit should contact Tim Welsh at tim@loopgallery.ca, or call the gallery directly at 416 516-2581.

WATER ADVISORY! is curated by Crystal Sinclair and Loop artist Rochelle Rubinstein. A co-founder of Idle No More and recipient of the OPSEU 2016 Human Rights and Equity award, Crystal Sinclair has a long history of art and activism around clean water campaigns for Indigenous communities. Rochelle Rubinstein is a printmaker, painter, fabric and book artist, environmental activist, and community arts facilitator.