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Sung Ja Kim Connection

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November 4 – November 26th, 2017

Reception: Saturday, November 4th, 2 – 5 PM

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Sung Ja Kim entitled Connection.

Straight lines and curved lines connect us to our destinations. Connecting with these personal destinations occurs through a journey involving new ways to live our lives. Yet our connections to our destinations can often be obscured during our life journey.

As we connect firmly by putting our trust in the right things our connections give us hope. Connecting by and through our life journey in hope of things yet unseen creates images of our destination in our hearts and minds. But the full awareness of our life’s purpose will be revealed when we reach our life destination.

Our ultimate connections by and the straight and curved lines of our life journey becomes layered with the passage of time. These layers of time connect our pasts to our presents and lead us into our futures.

Sung Ja Kim’s works in this exhibition all use only the colour white. This is because white readily absorbs the free range of other colours. These other colours symbolize the textures of our life experiences. Yet the connecting curved and straight lines are white to enable all the other textures to blend into the ebb and flow of life.

Gareth Bate In the Garden

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November 4 – November 26, 2017

Reception: Saturday, November 4th, 2-5 PM

 

“No guru, no method, no teacher 

Just you and I and nature”

(In the Garden, Van Morrison)

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to present In the Garden by Gareth Bate, a collection of recent and new works. In Gareth’s own words:

Standhal Syndrome: Last year I visited an exhibition that I found so overwhelming I had to leave, twice. It felt like I was in an altered state of dizzying awareness. The condition of being completely overwhelmed by art is known as Standhal Syndrome. Plants and flowers were bursting, swirling and growing in every direction. The show was a whirling excess of patterns and complexity. It was like life itself, nothing simple about it. What resonated most for me, was the feeling that in my own work, I was tapped into something archetypal. It was clear that many artists from around the world, and throughout time, had felt the same intuition. The universe is like a garden.

A Cosmic Garden: These were gardens with a higher purpose. To me, these artists were making images that were like metaphors of the universe. Tiny images of the cosmos. Perhaps as humans we desperately want the universe to be like a garden so that it all makes sense. A garden has a gardener, who shapes nature, and makes order out of chaos.

Bliss: Gardens Real and Imagined: I was very moved by this exhibition curated by Natalia Nekrassova at the Textile Museum of Canada. It featured centuries of textile works from around the world. All of them unified by an exuberant love of plants and flowers. The time and craftsmanship that went into these works was mind blowing. I think we need more shows like this that emphasize what we have in common on a deep human level rather than everything that’s different.

What I see: When I look at In The Garden I see life swirling around. I feel energy and vibration. Plants growing and blossoms exploding. Particles and atoms zipping about. I see the heavens, planets and galaxies. I feel a world bubbling and blooming, evolving and fucking. Like Toronto, I see a beautiful mess. A vibrant crudeness, crowded and busy, filled up to the brink. Trying to punch holes. Packed with stuff to do and endless projects. Distractions and updates. Chaotic and unordered. Anxiety. Endless lists. I see a desire for an ordered world and a cleared out space. A need to always prove something. Or is that just me?

Blender: My work is like a blender with the same ingredients added in different combinations and then mixed together into new drinks. The cosmos has been a central theme in my work for years. So have storms, clouds, grasses, plants and flowers. Finding order in chaos, shifting perspectives and current news events. But until now the cosmos hadn’t mixed with the plants and flowers. Since Cape Flora, my last exhibition at loop Gallery, I’ve spent the last year out on the streets of Toronto photographing constantly every day. I’m always shooting details of colours, street life, plants and flowers. The result is thousands of photographs.

Colour Charts: Art School Untangled is my private studio art courses. I teach an intensive eight week course devoted exclusively to mixing paint called The Colour Mixing Detective. As I’ve developed this course I’ve created hundreds of complex colour charts and mixed an exhaustive amount of colour combinations. The process has been fascinating and I’ve learned a lot. I’m using colours I’d never have touched and discovered a remarkable level of nuance.

Byproducts: In the Garden emerged over time out of a process I’ve used in the past. While I was doing hundreds of colour charts, instead of squirting my paint on a palette, I used a wood painting surface. I’d continually turn it around, and randomly wipe my brushes on it. Essentially, these paintings are the accumulation of my wiped brushstrokes! Layer upon layer, built up over time, until something suddenly happened. A spark of life. It became a painting! Over a year this process grew into a body of work with over 25 paintings.

Emergence: The process was like improvisation or jazz. There’s a set of limits or rules, but then it’s all about letting surprising things emerge. I never set out to make paintings that evoked a garden, or the cosmos or anything like that. These paintings are totally abstract, yet I still feel those things. It just happened on it’s own without even trying. It’s not about thinking, it’s about trusting. Knowing without knowing. Letting it flow like nature. The key is recognizing it when it happens!

Changes: When I used this process in the past in my Cosmos and Anarchy series, I took the mess of paint that accumulated and added all sorts of imagery on top. For In the Garden I mostly left things alone. But I’d be lying if I said I didn’t continue to work on them. I’d edit things out. Exaggerate or clarify. Create more volume or depth. Maybe pull something forward and push something back. In painting there’s a time for going nuts and throwing it all out there, but afterwards you need to get some perspective and do some editing. Does this actually work?

Lessons: For me the number one lesson of these paintings was “stop fucking with them!” Leave them alone. Let them be what they are. Accept them without feeling the need to fix them too much. I can now go back and look at “unfinished” paintings from the past and know that I can leave them alone. They’re already done, and often better than ones I thought were done. Now I continually ask can I accept this as a finished painting?”

Many Worlds: For a long time I’ve thought about painting as like building a universe. It’s a glimpse inside another world. Like opening windows or punching holes. Alternate universes could exist, but they will always have their own laws. They have to be internally coherent, You can’t just throw anything in there.

Joan Mitchell: I’ve grown to love the paintings of abstract expressionist Joan Mitchell. I admire her rawness. She was willing to let things sit there in a messy state. She didn’t finesse the life out of it or feel the need to present a well done painting. She knew that the mess was filled with energy and excitement. Leave it rough. The crudeness is the power.

John Abrams Spring, French River

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October 7 – October 29, 2017

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 7,  2 – 5 PM

 

Spring, French River — on view from October 7 to 29, 2017, at Loop Gallery — sees John Abrams return to his iconic Canadian History paintings, a series he began in the early 1990s and worked on off and on until 2002. Works from this series can be found in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Canada Council (Ottawa), the Museum of Contemporary Art (Toronto), the Art Museum at the University of Toronto, the Art Gallery of Guelph, McMaster Museum of Art (Hamilton), the Agnes Etherington Art Centre (Kingston), the Art Gallery of Windsor, and the Tom Thomson Art Gallery (Owen Sound).

 

Spring, French River consists of a series of portraits of Group of Seven members and a few of their friends, as well as imagery from the Group’s most famous multi-hued landscapes — those iconic works that capture the land, water, seasons, and weather that have come to define the Canadian wilderness. Here, the colorful scenes are reduced to simple grisaille panels with text, each with one of group members’ names painted as if it belonged on a movie marquee, a presentation that gestures to the Group’s coalescence into a brand in contemporary Canadian culture.

Abrams’ deconstructed suite functions as a stepping-off point for larger paintings that consider the land not only as the subject matter for the Group of Seven’s art, but also as a reflection of the often-vexed relationship we as Canadians have with our natural environment. The landscape operates at once as a signifier of national identity, a backdrop against which contested histories play out, and a site for aggressive industrial expansion that affords some prosperity and others scarcity.

Installed together, Abrams’s painterly revisions have a semiotic function insofar as they interrogate the Canadian cultural imaginary as a coded language of signs. Even a beautiful and evocative image such as Tom Thomson’s Spring, French River, appropriated and reproduced in black and white by Abrams, appears tinged with dry wit as the painter’s reimagining quite literally denaturalizes it. Filtered through the artist’s deconstructionist reading of Canadian history, this scene and others become documents not just of the landscape, but also of the historical processes that bestow meaning upon it.

Mindy Yan Miller Two Cows and a Coke

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October 7 – 29, 2017

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 7, 2017, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Mindy Yan Miller loves her animal hides by cutting, shaving and penetrating. Loop Gallery is pleased to present the artist’s latest work in an exhibition entitled Two Cows and a Coke. Yan Miller uses potent and irreconcilable materials that are precisely woven and arranged to produce beautiful works that speak to the politics of food production and the ethical relations we have with materials.

Sliced hides are propped open with stiff window blinds. Other larger skins hang flaccidly from the ceiling over pools of shiny Plexiglas. A mass of spent coke cans is arranged on the floor in a circle.

Known for her massive installations of potent materials, Yan Miller has been working with animal hides for the last five years. What started as an experiment in Op-on-skin has become a deeper and more enduring investigation into the value of things. – MGM 

Mindy Yan Miller has taught Fibres and Material Practices at Concordia University since she graduated with an MFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design in 1990. She has been the recipient of numerous grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and the Saskatchewan Arts Board. Her work has been exhibited in Europe, Korea and across Canada and the United States in venues including: Artforum (Berlin), 12-14 contemporary (Vienna), W139 (Amsterdam), Mercer Union, YYZ, (Toronto), Optica, La Centrale, (Montreal), The Southern Alberta Art Gallery (Lethbridge), Stride Gallery, Glenbow Museum (Calgary), Dunlop Art Gallery (Regina), Art in General (NYC) and Hallwalls (Buffalo).

loop elsewhere FALL EDITION

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Yael, Brotman, Blackfriars, etching on Kurotani and Taiwanese papers, foamcore, acrylic, 2013

YAEL BROTMAN

Yael’s exhibition, Waterfront opened September 8th and runs until October 21st at the Martha St. Studio in Winnipeg.
 

MARIA GABANKOVA

Maria’s current exhibition Sculpture Time is on at the Rentz Museum, in Kuks, Czech Republic and runs through till April 2018.
Her paintings are interpretations of Baroque sculptures representing Virtues and Vices. Through visual interventions she poses questions about how relevant or redundant are issues of moral and ethical values in today’s world influenced by technology, human greed and consumerism. In August 2017 this show was part of a yearly baroque/ contemporary multimedia festival Theatrum Kuks featuring concerts, theatre, puppets and other on site performances and presentations.
For details about the festival:  http://theatrum-kuks.cz 
and for details about the exhibition: www.rentzovomuzeum.cz or http://paintinggallery.ca

LIBBY HAGUE

Libby’s work can be seen at the following:
Kyoto Hanga, International Print Exhibition, Japan and Canada, curated by Liz Ingram and April Dean, Art Gallery of Regina, September 1st – October 5th.
 
2017 Departures – Masterpieces of Canadian Printing, curated by Walter Jules, Ardell Gallery of Modern Art, Bankok, October 19th – November 26th, 2017
Open Studio’s booth at Editions, Art Toronto, October 27th – 30th.
The past is never over: A Libby Hague Retrospective, Art Gallery of Mississauga, curated by Kendra Ainsworth, Nov. 2, 2017
 

JENN LAW

Jenn has recently established a new publishing platform, Arts & Letters Press, with artist friend and colleague Penelope Stewart. The duo are looking forward to representing this initiative at the 2/edition Art Book Fair in Toronto, October 27-30, 2017, where they will be exhibiting artist’s books and multiples, as well as promoting the 2018 launch of the biannual publication Art + Reading.

For further information, please visit their website: www.artsandletterspress.com

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s exhibit of drypoint mono prints and wall sculptures, Hills and Lines, has been extended until October 21st, 2017 at the AH Centre.

www.ahcentre.ca

LOOP GALLERY

presented Anxious Space an off-site temporary exhibition which considered how the threat of environmental destruction changes the way we experience everyday spaces.
Featuring Loop members: Yael Brotman, Sheryl Dudley, David Holt, Adrian Fish, Ester Pugliese, Sandra Gregson, Tanya Cunnington, Mary Catherine Newcomb, Rochelle Rubenstein.
The change in perception of everyday spaces brought about by environmental threat could be anything from premature nostalgia to zealous protection, in other words, the threat of destruction highlights the fragility and importance of spaces typically taken for granted, rendering them sacred. In exploring the tension between sacredness and destruction, two important questions must be asked: what amount of threat to a space makes it sacred?; what amount of damage to a space it eliminates that sacredness?
 Curated by: Salena Barry

Carolyn Dinsmore Rock Water Time

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September 9th – October 1st, 2017

Opening Reception: September 9th, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Carolyn Dinsmore entitled Rock Water Time.

 

In Carolyn Dinsmore’s new body of work she draws inspiration from the rock and water of Georgian Bay, zooming in on patterns that are evidence of gradual build-up and erosion layered over infinite time and the always changing water pushing against and flowing alongside.

Her paintings are close-ups, small sections of rock – hard, smooth, rough surfaces resulting from years in formation, surfaces carved, scarred, polished, and lichened. The water details are caught in motion, sometimes gentle and soothing, to powerful and aggressive.

Patterns, mutations from the unfathomably distant past, still indiscernibly reacting to the elements of nature, contrast with those of constant motion, unpredictable, shifting from surging violent force through gentle rhythmic rippling to mirror stillness.

By isolating and highlighting details from the larger landscape the artist is offering to viewers personal and immediate clues, links to the incomprehensible vastness of the environment and the rhythm of time and change.

Carolyn Dinsmore studied art history at Queen’s and the University of Toronto and taught high school art before opening a shop that specialized in textiles mostly from India and  Africa. She returned to school to study at The Art Centre at Central Tech in Toronto. This is her third show at Loop.

Sandra Gregson Troubling

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September 9th – October 1st, 2017

Opening Reception:September 9th, 2 – 5 PM

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Sandra Gregson entitled troubling.

During the summer of 2016 Gregson participated in a Parks Canada residency at Mount Revelstoke in British Columbia. The landscape is spectacular: immeasurable forests, dramatic mountain ranges, fertile river valleys. Awed by the landscape and wanting to reconcile what she was seeing with what she was noticing and researching about environmental concerns (the threatened loss of natural habitat for bears and caribou in Revelstoke to global climate change), Gregson began representing land from different viewpoints: observational, aerial, mapped, detail, perspective, fragments, and historical, to better understand our relationship with it.

Gregson’s paintings depict landscape fraught with human intervention: land that is being divided, mapped, mined, gridded, cut, scraped, reshaped. At times the land appears fertile and resilient, at other times, depleted.

Since using painted images in her animated video, from land (2014), Gregson has worked with water-based oils. Prior to this she worked with sculpture, video, drawing and installation. She holds a BFA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and MFA from York University. Recent exhibitions include Para//el Room at DNA Artspace, London, ON, WIFF Toronto, and Parkdale Film and Video Showcase.

JJ Lee,Amy Swartz,Natalie Waldburger Back to the Drawing Board

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August 15 – September 3, 2017

Reception: Thursday, August 24, 5-7  PM

Artists will be drawing August 15 & 16, 12 -3 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by JJ Lee, Amy Swartz and Natalie Majaba Waldburger entitled Back to the Drawing Board.

 

Back to the Drawing Board is an exhibition of the collaborative work of artists-educators at the intersection of process and labour.  The show will feature large-scale, mixed media and site-specific installation of collaborative drawings.

Drawing as a visual language can bypass societal classifications including cultural, social, economic and educational barriers. As both an organizational and a decolonization strategy, the show will feature the fluidity of the medium, using a variety of drawing materials (including carbon paper, ballpoint pen, charcoal, graph paper, tape and blood) and methods (collage, photocopying). Through the use of ongoing open-ended drawing processes, the fundamental building blocks of drawing point, perspective, line, value will be the basis for the finished installation, but will also question notions of hierarchy and perceptions of power.

Through the collaborative efforts of the involved artists, this project is a necessary and timely tool to address the ongoing conversation about the complexity, and reality of creative work. The exhibition will include collaborative work created both before the exhibition begins and an in-gallery collaborative drawing performance. The artists will be in attendance on Aug 15th and 16th using the process of drawing as a collaborative and performative activity.

“The Drawing Board” is a newly formed group of artist-educator collaborators JJ Lee, Amy Swartz and Natalie Majaba Waldburger.

 

Michael Pflug Paintings

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July 15th – August 6th, 2017

Reception: July 15th, 2 – 5 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Michael Pflug entitled Paintings.

Since the 1940’s, Pflug has produced an incredible oeuvre of modernist and post-modern painting. Inspired to respond to the European movement of New Objectivity, Pflug continues to paint vitally personal and poetic scenes from everyday life to abstract expression. Taking notes from famous artists like Caspar David Friedrich and Saul Steinberg, Pflug decided to innovate into new painterly styles that were unseen at the time. Through his iconic body of work, Loop Gallery is ecstatic to present Pflug’s first ever Toronto retrospective.

Michael Pflug was born in Kassel Germany in 1929. He began painting landscape watercolours in Potsdam 1943. He was mentored by modern painters Viera da Silva and Arpad Scenès in Paris, France. From 1951-1952 he went to Art School in Hamburg. He married Christiane Schutt in 1957, another modern painter. Pflug moved to Toronto in 1960 , where he presently lives and works.

Martha Eleen Watershed

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June 17 – July 9, 2017

Reception: June 17th, 2 – 5 PM

Through representation of invisible spaces, Eleen’s new series Watershed attempts to allow meaning to be created via artistic process without reliance on subject matter. Watershed acts as a microcosm for the search of artistic and personal identity through the painterly practice. The exhibition’s works use abstract formalism, dynamic colour palettes, and generous spaces to provide a visceral experience. Created under pre-defined parameters, the 4’ by 4’ pieces employ a collection of interacting visual fields, assuaging the eye and mind into questioning how representation and abstract imagery can collide to create artifacts of personal and artistic histories.

Working after a moment of tragedy, the body of work signifies the artist’s new path into an unknown future. As carefully measured sections of intense hues and comforting tones blend together and disrupt each other, Watershed poses larger questions regarding the work’s creation and meaning. However, Eleen’s series defies any easy interpretation, instead working within ambiguity in order to exemplify the difficulty of art; art should not be easy, it must hold itself to a higher ideal. Each piece offers a different example of how space can be penetrated and transformed into representation. In doing so, the exhibition reifies internal experience onto the painted canvas, ripe with personal and collective meanings. What does the viewer understand through these works? Watershed showcases that the best answer for understanding results from a burrowing inward reflection of the self.

— Matthew Kyba

“Bliss lives in life’s interstices, in its crevices and tributaries. Sometimes you have to look to one side to see it, like looking at a star.”

~ (Gary Michael Dault, Quotation and Bliss: Negotiating Martha Eleen’s History of the Future, exhibition brochure 2016)