All Posts By

admin

In Progress: New paintings by Alistair Magee and Mark Adair

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

August 22 – 26

Reception: Saturday,  August 25, 2-5 PM


Loop is proud to present In Progress, a brief look behind the creative curtain at two veteran artists’ search for new modes of expression. In their own words:

 The paintings included in this exhibition at Loop are part of a new area of investigation. Fragments of transferred images from magazines, found notes, newspapers, letters and drawings operate as discrete temporal artifacts that preserve the flow of real time. Motifs are mirrored, rotated, repeated. Conjuring up remembered experience (personal, political, historical) they merge with mark making to suggest possible new relationships.

 I intend that my work should transcend painterly formalism and come loaded with personal and political undercurrents. Surface-matter and subject-matter should work in conjunction with one another in a dialectical tension, neither taking precedence. This exhibition gives me the opportunity to assess the progress of these new paintings.

Alistair Magee

pastedGraphic.png

 All of the pictures in this show are ‘political,’ but the oil paintings are especially so. They reflect a deep anxiety about the gaps between our political leadership and what might be called the best advice given for how to address climate change. Why such a huge gap? Harvest Time (1983) was the last time I picked up the brushes, and that was also a ‘political’ picture. I, like most sane people of the day, was worried about the bombs. 

I have to point out that, for me, the choice of medium or method is driven by the depth of the compulsion involved. If I don’t feel passionate about it, I do something else. I don’t consider myself a painter. I do consider myself an artist. But a year or so ago I had this non-stop-won’t leave-me-alone-for-a-minute hankering to start painting a new sequence of the Death Drinks series, and it turned into this peering into the dark thickets to see what was going on in there. 

 Things seem to keep pulling at us, making us do absolutely crazy things, and we seem so utterly powerless to resist — to set ourselves on a common course, far, far away from the current divisive discourse that is nothing but a distraction from the work that needs doing.

— Mark Adair

 

Sheryl Dudley The Sea Was Never Blue

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

July 21 – August 12, 2018

Opening Reception: July 21, 2018

 

Loop Gallery is proud to present The Sea Was Never Blue, an exhibition of new work by Sheryl Dudley. In the artist’s own words:

“The series began as an attempt to record incidental moments — a ray of sunlight piercing a kitchen window, clouds casting shadows across tall buildings. Too ephemeral to capture, these moments nonetheless remain embedded in memory, taking on a filmic quality that suggests the quivering shadows of trees or figures walking along a sidewalk.

Such moments are the inspiration that drove The Sea Was Never Blue.

The  fluidity and weightlessness of ink in this series offer a way of apprehending images that draw on sensation, holding still for a moment that which is fleeting and fugitive all around us.”

Sheryl Dudley is a longstanding member of Loop Gallery who has exhibited extensively, both within Canada and internationally. Visit http://www.sheryldudley.com to learn more. 

The Sea Was Never Blue will be on display at Loop Gallery between July 21 and August 12, 2018. For media inquiries please contact Tim Welsh at 416-516-2581 or email tim@loopgallery.ca.

Kelly Cade BioIntervals

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

July 21 – August 12, 2018

Opening Reception: July 21,  2 – 5 PM

 

 BioIntervals is a continuation of Kelly Cade’s practice of abstracting photographic images to create new landscapes. These new works are intended to be points of entry into the quandary of measurement and meaning, and to underline the invented nature of such paracosms.

BioIntervals explores the intersection of our created intervals — our systems of measurement — and how they shape our experience of nature. It examines how our impulse to measure, categorize and define the natural world may in fact dissociate us further from that which we are trying to understand. 

In these works, linear patterns reveal inscriptions of meaning that overcode what lies beneath. Iridescent circles reflect our attraction to distraction, and our attraction to measurement as a system with its own internal logic.

These random geometric interventions of curved trajectories allow for a constantly shifting focus, suggesting a new dimension for inward and outward telescopings, as we continually search for meaning and place.

Kelly Cade is a visual artist working in a range of media, from painting and photography to installations. She is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design and has exhibited in both solo and group shows. Her work can be found in private and public collections throughout Canada, the U.S., Australia and the U.K.

kipjones second nature facsimile

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23, 2 – 5 PM

 

 “Doppelgangers as reflections of the strong discordance of modernity as it speaks to our involvement with nature”

 -Hillel Schwartz: The culture of the copy:Striking likenesses, unreasonable facsimiles.New York. Zone Books, 1996

 

The works in second nature facsimile seek to address the troubling tensions between humans’ vision of nature and the natural in the quest to create a contemporary civilization. They are playful acts of research into the notions and process of the cast object as a facsimile or copy of an ideal. 

Through the use of a broad range of materials, the various elements that constitute each individual form create an inter-connected discourse between the objects. These works are statements that tell an integral story of the interaction with the natural. This relationship is examined through familiar icons such as cast iron house frameworks, which refer to the planet as a place where we live. 

The works in second natural facsimile are intended as acts of engagement that create descriptive narratives, pushing the limits of multiples through the use of process and materiality. 

About the Artist

kipjones is an active and experienced public artist, sculptor and instructor living in Toronto. Over the past two decades, he has created public and studio-based works addressing various issues related to the critical and conceptual discourse of contemporary three-dimensionality. More specifically, he believes sculpture to be an open genre that speaks to space as a societal dimension, gesture as an action or event, and time as a response or reflection.

In his artistic research, kipjones addresses this complexity of space via immersive, site-specific installations, public art and object-making. Solo and co-designed permanent public art projects are installed at the Calgary International Airport, Moncton City Hall, Kelowna Public Library, King’s Square in Charlottetown, PEI, and the Markham Museum. 

 

Adrian Fish The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23rd, 2 – 5 PM

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (commonly known as UAVs or drones) are a relatively new technology in a nascent stage of development. The ability to accurately maneuver a camera at high altitudes to inexpensively produce high-quality photographic imagery is a remarkably powerful technological development. The ability of UAVs to operate from these elevated perspectives – well above those previously made possible by stands, booms, scaffolds or tripods – invites many new subject explorations. 

My research interest is in building an archive of UAV images and videos that document the edges of urban/built environments. The Aesthetics of Infrastructure: Transportation is an exploration of the physical framework of the roads, buildings, intersections and parking lots of contemporary urban territory mingling with natural environments.

The images are presented on screens as moving stills – short video loops that offer insight into the organizations and patterns of the framework of urbanity. My intention is to insert UAV-generated material into the public sphere for contemplation and critical reflection on the impact and aesthetics of urban development.

About the Artist

Adrian Fish is a Toronto-born photo-based artist and educator currently living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Adrian holds an MFA from York University in Toronto, as well as undergraduate accreditation from OCAD University in Toronto and the Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, ON. His work has shown numerous public institutions, artist-run centres and commercial galleries in Calgary, Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Winnipeg in Canada, as well as internationally in Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn and Chelsea, NY, Columbus, OH, Berlin, Germany, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Tokyo, Japan. 

Adrian’s work has been featured in publications such as Canadian Art, Vice Magazine and WIRED.com. Adrian is currently Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Media Arts at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  

loop elsewhere SUMMER EDITION

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

 

 

image: Jane Lowbeer, Small Things, found objects, 11″ x 4″, 2018

KELLY CADE

Last chance to catch Kelly’s exhibition at Hatch Gallery in Prince Edward County until June 15th, 2018. Gallery hours are Wednesday to Sunday – 11am to 5:00pm.

LIBBY HAGUE

The catalogue for INTERVENTION: 31 WOMEN PAINTERS,  the Montreal painting show at the McClure Gallery which was curated by Harold Klunder is now available from ABC Art Books. http://www.abcartbookscanada.com/

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s exhibition, Preponderance of the Small, will be at the Visual Art Centre of Clarington  from June 3 to July 1st.
Unusual gallery hours are 10am – 9pm Tuesday  to Thursday and 10am to 4pm Friday-Sunday. Jane will also be giving an Artist Talk on June 17th 2pm – 4pm.

AVA ROTH

Ava has a solo exhibition coming up, from July 6-August 25th, at the Agnes Jameison Gallery in Minden, ON. Opening reception is July 6th from 4:30 – 6pm. Layer Landscapes: Wax and Thread, explores the tension between permanent and temporary, solid and delicate and transparent and opaque.

John Ide What Paper Remembers

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 26, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is proud to present What Paper Remembers, a collection of new work by John Ide. In his own words:

“Earlier this year I was going through some old drawings and wondered what would happen if I erased some of them and reworked what was left. I’ve been erasing ever since, and redrawing based on what the paper remembers.

Erasing is part of my drawing process, inspired in large part by how much the printmaking paper I use refuses to “forget.” This random refusing to forget forces me to respond and I find the push-pull creatively stimulating.” 

What Paper Remembers continues Ide’s exploration of the connections between memory, history and the artistic process. Please join us on Sunday, May 27th from 2-5 p.m., as we celebrate the exhibition’s opening. 

John Ide is a longstanding loop member who has exhibited widely in Toronto and beyond. The preoccupation with personal and collective memory has been an ongoing theme in his work across disparate media. After years of installation-based work, Ide returned to drawing in 2006 and has continued to evolve his practice in the years since. 

Adrienne Trent The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 27, 2 – 5  PM

 

 Popular culture revolves around the idea that actors, sets, spoken lines and special effects are not a constructed reality, shot frame-by-frame to enable the viewer to get lost in the plot, but rather reality itself. This creates a ‘false consciousness,’ based on ersatz representations which television and film makers intend for viewers. I began to pursue the idea of exploring this false, fabricated reality as the basis for an exhibition, particularly as it’s a subject I have close, first-hand knowledge of: I’ve worked in art departments in the Toronto film industry for the last 20 years.

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature includes a projected video loop consisting of a series of 3 minute videos. I filmed them while rustling trees and observing lighting and special effects on a successful, 4-season (so far) American TV series. At the beginning of Season 3, the executive producers informed me that some viewers had called to express a particular disturbance: during interior scenes, the trees which I’d placed outside the windows were not “moving in the breeze” and therefore “didn’t look real.” To solve this thorny problem, I was asked to shake the trees manually by tying filament to them and gently rustling them, during the brief takes in which a window with an exterior view was in the shot.

 

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature consists of footage of myself in the act of shaking the trees; I also caught on video a helium “moon” whose artificial light shone down onto a constructed waterfall, and a cozy living room, whose crackling fireplace flames up instantly thanks to a quick propane torch.

 

In addition to the projection, the administrative desk has been subjected to a process referred to in film as “breakdown.” This indicates the artificial aging of props, sets and costumes on a film set to emulate the time period in which the story takes place. Though I’ve worked on projects that span millennia, for the objects in this show I’ll limit history to the last ten years, a period not yet obsolete and dingy. The act of re-inscribing recent history on an object speaks to the central role this ‘false consciousness’ plays in the creative process. 

 

My film work has enabled me to experience a wide variety of projects and budgets. I’ve been hired onto multimillion dollar projects such as Pompeii, as well as many small independent films, and also union productions for notable directors such as Denis Villeneuve, Denys Arcand, Deepa Mehta, Bruce MacDonald, Don McKellar and zombie guru George Romero.

 

 

Libby Hague Wider than the sky

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

April 28 – May 20, 2018

Opening Reception:  April 28, 2-5 PM

Artist Conversation: May 20, 3-5 PM

Wider than the sky is an exhibition of large woodcuts and a mixed media project by Libby Hague, produced enthusiastically in the OCADU Digital Painting Residency.

“My work examines complex social relationships in a precarious world. I feel that everything we value (ourselves, our relationships, our country, our planet) is fragile and we have to find a way not to be overwhelmed by the anger and noise around us and work together to find common ground.”

Wider than the sky uses the imagination to locate patterns that bring the vast macro and micro scales of science (the cosmos, DNA) together with text and objects, the daily gestures and concerns of a clamorous world. It’s like looking at the stars and thinking “Here I am, part of this in some small way.” It’s not a lonely thought; it connects us to an orderly universe – one growing infinitesimally more comprehensible – a comforting thought right now.

Rather than attempting to overwhelm the viewer, the artist leaves “breathing spaces” in these complex systems, breaks for perspective and attention, to reaffirm human values of kindness and consideration and let us listen to each other.

Libby Hague has a hybrid practice of printmaking and installation. Her recent exhibitions include The past is never over: a retrospective, Art Gallery of Mississauga; Inventing Hope, Idea Exchange, Ontario; Departures – Masterpieces of Canadian Printing, Ardell Gallery of Modern Art, Bangkok; Habitat, Harbourfront, Toronto.

Find Libby online at http://libbyhague.com/.

Tara Cooper On Sabbatical

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

April 28 – May 20, 2018

Opening Reception: April 28, 2 – 5 PM

Artist Conversation: May 20,  3-4 PM

 

In Chasing the Perfect, Natalia Ilyin talks about going to grad school: how she imagined meditative walks in the woods and lots of time to think. But anyone who’s gone to grad school knows that this is not the case, that the reality has more commonalities with a marathon — something that pushes your physical and mental state.

Since January, I’ve been on sabbatical, and this show is a mash-up of what I’ve seen, done and thought. Being on sabbatical isn’t exactly a marathon, nor is it as fraught as grad school, but it’s also not the leisurely time imagined. There’s pressure to achieve, pressure to justify the privilege, and an overall undercurrent of urgency propelled by the knowledge that it will be years before the next one comes around.

On Sabbatical includes excerpts from an exhibition I had in January and one coming up this summer, drawings of an outdoor public artwork that will be installed this spring, the beginnings of a collaborative project with McGill University’s Redpath Museum (one of Canada’s oldest natural history museums), and some work I made on a residency at the Vermont Studio Center. It’s got a bit of the ‘what I did on my summer vacation’ vibe, but also offers a kind of behind-the-scenes look at the creative mess — the doubts, false starts and things that keep me going.