All Posts By

admin

loop elsewhere SPRING EDITION

By | Blog, Uncategorized | No Comments

                  detail from Elizabeth D’Agostino, Makeshift Tales, 2018

ELIZABETH D’AGOSTINO

Elizabeth’s new work Makeshift Tales opens April 20th at the Alberta Printmakers Gallery. It includes an essay by loop member JENN LAW, which you can read it here. Opening reception is April 20th from 7 pm – 9 pm -and the show runs until June 1st.

MARTHA ELEEN

Martha’s show Before Tomorrow opens at the Art Gallery of Bancroft and runs from May 2nd until May 26th.
Opening reception May 4th at 7:20 pm.
For more information visit: www.artgallerybancroft.ca

SANDRA GREGSON

Sandra is currently doing a two-month art residency at SIM (The Association of Icelandic Visual Artists) in Reykjavik, Iceland.

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s work is up until April 21st in the group show Revisiting the Landscape at Open Studio, 401 Richmond St. West, Toronto. Opening April 6th is, Periphery, an installation in the foyer of  StarX gallery in Peterborough, Ontario.

Also, opening June 3rd is a solo show of Jane’s work, Preponderance of the Small, at the Visual Art Centre Of Clarington (VAC)

Sandra Smirle Stellar Baby

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

March 31 – April 22, 2018

Opening Reception Saturday, March 31, 2 – 5 PM

You are born with the boundless potential of all things, the potential to be all those things at once. Nothing is finite. Yours is a universe of possibilities; the whole universe is a possibility. You’re a star, baby. You’re all the stars. 

Only when you let slip being young will those countless simultaneous possibilities collapse into one — an aspect of an object, frozen in context — a plodding increment where once were quantum leaps and bounds. Just as a particle exists in two places unobserved, until an instance of mindful surveillance eradicates the odds.

But I have to watch, eyes on the opportunity horizon. Have to patrol the outer limitless, cradling my stellar heart. How long can I keep you holding the delicate balance, maintaining every possibility of all the things at once?

How long can I keep your balance? 

In her new series of work, Sandra Smirle uses video, photo, paper cutting and sculpture to continue exploring notions of seeing and being seen. Here, her gaze has shifted from a macro-picture to a micro-view — a place, in every sense, closer to home. As living and maturing in a rapidly changing world sends us pinging from pressure point to tension to perplexity, the need to grab hold and monitor the (domestic) situation seems like a natural response. This is surveillance in an older sense of watching over, or guardianship.

Stellar Baby casts us as the surveyor of a girl who is navigating all her possibilities, balancing the probabilities. With her head in the clouds, she is poised on the cusp of adulthood — her expanding potential remains unrealized, even as order threatens to impose a new reality, to reveal a singular course through her universe of chaos. We are invited to explore the distinctions between balance and imbalance, to contemplate how the smallest adjustment of equilibrium, the smallest structural change, can be a radical proposition with astronomical consequences — a defining act of observation.

About the Artist

Sandra Smirle is a multidisciplinary Canadian artist based in Montreal, who uses drawing, sculpture, paper cutting, photo, video, and installation, to explore ideas around surveillance, dataveillance and our ‘viewer society.’ Smirle’s work, which examines how new technologies impact the way we view our world suggests a survey of seeing and being seen — how we, in turn, are viewed by mechanisms designed to navigate our movements.

Smirle graduated with an MFA (2015) from Concordia University. Her work has been exhibited nationally as well as internationally, and is held in private and corporate collections in Canada, Australia, and Europe. Smirle has been a member of Loop Gallery in Toronto since 2010 and is part of the Montreal-based collective, Incubator for Phantom Pregnancies (IFPP), which debuted its first exhibition this spring and presented its first collaborative installation during this year’s 2018 Nuit Blanche in Montreal. Her work has been featured in The Map as Art: Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography, published by Princeton Architectural Press, as well as the Globe and Mail and The Toronto Star.

Linda Heffernan The Perpetuation of Memory

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

March 31 – April 22, 2018

Opening reception March 31, 2 – 5 PM

loop Gallery is proud to present The Perpetuation of Memory, a new exhibition by Linda Heffernan. Continuing her practice of working with open source satellite imagery, and her preoccupation with the impact humans have on the natural world, Heffernan in this exhibition uses contemporary Google Earth images to recreate a series of First World War battle sites. Inspired partly by the upcoming centennial of the Armistice of November 11, 1918, the resulting images juxtapose the violence of war against impressionistic landscapes, commenting on the passage of time and the ultimate resiliency of nature.

Linda Heffernan is a Cobourg-based artist exploring themes of consumer capitalism and bureaucracy in an ever more interconnected global economy. She has a BFA from OCAD University and her work is included in private and public collections in Canada. Linda Heffernan has been a member of loop Gallery since 2006. She has exhibited her work in a number of galleries in Toronto’s Queen West district, as well as Whitby’s Station Gallery, The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, and the Northumberland Art Gallery.

Loop Gallery & Wellington Water Watchers Water Advisory!

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

March 3 – 25, 2018

Exhibition Launch:  Sunday, March 4th – 1 PM

 

 

 

Just in time for Water Week (March 20 – 27) and World Water Day (March 22), Loop Gallery and Wellington Water Watchers are proud to announce WATER ADVISORY! Featuring work by Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, WATER ADVISORY! combines art and activism to explore the disconnect between society and the water that sustains it.

WATER ADVISORY! is an intersectional call to action that urges viewers to interrogate their own relationship to the natural world through banners, print, and mixed media installations. Exhibiting artists include Beehive Collective, Crystal Sinclair, Tannis Nielson, Claudia Wong, Sally Pang, Erika James, Carol Cheong, Paul Morin, Sarit Cantor, and more

WATER ADVISORY! launches on Sunday March 4 at 1 pm with a conversation with the artists, followed by a performance by hip-hop group Test Their Logik. The exhibition will be open to the public from 12-5 pm Wednesdays and Thursdays, 12-6 pm Fridays and Saturdays, and 1-4 pm on Sundays, until March 25. Educators wishing to arrange a classroom visit should contact Tim Welsh at tim@loopgallery.ca, or call the gallery directly at 416 516-2581.

WATER ADVISORY! is curated by Crystal Sinclair and Loop artist Rochelle Rubinstein. A co-founder of Idle No More and recipient of the OPSEU 2016 Human Rights and Equity award, Crystal Sinclair has a long history of art and activism around clean water campaigns for Indigenous communities. Rochelle Rubinstein is a printmaker, painter, fabric and book artist, environmental activist, and community arts facilitator.

 

 

Kristen Fahrig Body Imprints

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

February 3 – 25th, 2018

Opening Reception: February 3rd, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is honoured to present Body Imprints, a retrospective of work by Kristen Fahrig.

Kristen Fahrig was a sculptor, educator and cultural animator who lived and worked in Toronto’s West End. Until her death last fall, she was best known for the numerous community art projects she initiated in her neighbourhood, as well as the public performances she created for the BIG on Bloor Festival, the Luminato Festival and the WinterCity Festival at Toronto City Hall.

Nowhere was Kristen’s community presence more keenly felt than at MacGregor Playground, a once-deserted park on Lansdowne Avenue. First as the playground’s artist-in-residence, and later as artistic director of the non-profit Botanicus Art Ensemble, Kristen’s tireless presence over a decade-and-a-half transformed MacGregor Playground into a family-friendly community hub. Over a shared love of art, theatre, craft and gardening, Kristen brought her neighbours together.

Body Imprints is a posthumous presentation of Kristen’s late sculptures. It shows the most personal side of her artistic practice, for which she struggled to gain recognition in her lifetime. Here, Kristen’s energy is turned inwards — to the self, the body and the natural world — to produce a diaristic sequence of sculptural reflections. “It’s about the imprints that the body makes,” Kristen wrote of these works. “The body is the negative space into which we can project ourselves and feel our connection with the earth.”

About the Curator 

Rupert Nuttle is a writer and painter based in Toronto. He received a BFA from NSCAD in 2013 and a Masters of Journalism from Carleton University in 2017. He has exhibited his paintings widely in Canada and abroad, and his art writing has appeared in C Magazine and Canadian Art, among other publications.

Eunha Kim Joy of Life

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

February 3 – 25th, 2018

Opening Reception: Saturday, February 3rd 2 – 5 PM

 

Eunha Kim’s Joy of Life is inspired by Nong-Ak, a traditional Korean music/dance form. Now showcased in formal performances, Nong-Ak originally celebrated rural holidays and the wish for a good harvest.

A highly expressive art form, Nong-Ak combines singing, dancing, and drumming. Dancers wear a traditional hat, known as a Sangmo – as they spin, the Sangmo’s long ribbons form whirling patterns that accompany the dancers’ celebratory, acrobatic motions.

Kim’s work is an attempt to visualize the sound and movement of Nong-Ak, and the joy of life expressed by the dancing farmers’ dynamic, head-spinning motions. Utilizing dripping paint and mixed media, she communicates her own joy in working outside of representative form, and invites her audience to feel the uplift and excitement of the Nong-Ak dancers.

Kim’s process mirrors the energy of motion inherent to Nong-Ak. As she sprinkles and drops paint and ink, highly kinetic lines emerge on the canvas. Her careful use of color creates a harmonic effect, similar to that of the well-coordinated instruments in a Nong-Ak performance.

By reimagining rural tradition, Joy of Life draws a connection from the past to the present. In her own words:

The “joy of life” that I focus is not simply what the farmers had in the past. In our daily lives nowadays, we sometimes suffer from depression, pessimism, heavy burden of life, and feelings of loneliness. Under the circumstances, however, I hope that the aesthetics and the approach I take on my work will offer people in the world comfort, and excitement to live. 

Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Eunha Kim is a Toronto-based artist. This is her first exhibition as a Loop member.

loop elsewhere NEW YEAR EDITION

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

 left to right: Marian Wihak, detail from Excavation(…closer to where we began)
and Libby Hague, detail from. Nov 8 Double Vision, 2008, 11 x 14 in. Oil and acrylic on canvas
 

LIBBY HAGUE

Libby’s retrospective, The Past is Never Over, closes January 1, 2018 at the Art Gallery of Mississauga.
http://www.artgalleryofmississauga.com
and the exhibition brochure can be downloaded here www.artgalleryofmississauga.com/downloads/LibbyHague_broch_17502_web.pdf

Also, her work is included in Intervention: 31 Women Painters at the McClure Gallery of the Visual Arts Centre in Montreal.
www.visualartscentre.ca/mcclure-gallery/the-gallery/
Invited Curator: Harold Klunder
Vernissage: Thursday February 1 at 6 pm
Exhibition: February 2 to 24
Conference: Friday February 2 at 7 pm
libbyhague.com

DAVID HOLT

David will be leading another summer studio art workshop for practicing artists in Orvieto, Italy, exploring connections between art and religion. The workshop will run from July 15 to August 4, 2018 and will take advantage of the area’s rich historical tradition of religious material culture from its Etruscan origins onward. Also available are a Seminar in art history, religion, and theology. Graduate level university credit available.
For more information about the Residency for Artists, Writers, and Graduate Students and how to participate visit:

MARIAN WIHAK

Marian’s installation EXCAVATION(…closer to where we began) is  part of this year’s Toronto Design Offsite Festival (TODO). This work was originally commissioned by LabSpace and Sculpting New Reads and was shown as part of the long-stranding one-day event, Word on the Street held at Harbourfront Toronto in September 2017. Wihak was invited to respond to Lisa Richter’s new book of poetry “Closer to Where We Began” and it was an auspicious pairing that has enriched both artists’ work.

Opening Reception is Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 6-9pm
with Lisa Richter reading from her new book of poetry, Closer to Where We Began
The exhibition is being staged in collaboration with Pekota Design under the joint title ElevationExcavation as part of the 2018 Toronto Design Offsite Festival.
Pekota Design, 406 Pacific Avenue (in the Junction)
Exhibition runs from  JANUARY 16th to 21st, 2018

P. Roch Smith got’em, got ’em, need ’em

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

January 6th – 28th, 2018

Opening Reception: January 13th, 2-5 PM

Q & A: Sunday, January 28th, 2 PM

P. Roch Smith’s got ’em, got ’em, need ’em recreates and reimagines the entire set of 1975 – 76 O-Pee-Chee NHL hockey cards. Each of the 395 individually framed cards in the set has been digitally altered in terms of colour, scale, and legibility.

The title refers to the verbal cues associated with sorting through another person’s collection — a mantra that would signal a potential trade. Growing up in the 1970s, collecting a complete set of hockey cards was the Everest of childhood ambitions. In his choice of the 1975-76 season, Smith has sought to fill the voids of a childhood collection by creating his personal “complete set”.

Collectively, these images continue Smith’s longtime exploration of memory and object. They are positioned at the intersection of sport and play as a trigger for questioning the creative act — of mass culture and its relationship to contemporary art. The installation examines the notion of what it means to be complete and the role of process as it relates to production of artifacts.

Smith is less interested in the idea of a collectible as a commodity than other questions: what drives the compulsion to collect something in the first place? How does one decide what to collect? When does one thing cease to be merely an object, and become part of a collection of other things?

Jean Baudrillard argues that “all objects in a collection become equivalent, thanks to that process of passionate abstraction we call possession. Further, a simple object can never be enough: invariably there will be a whole succession of objects…”  As an object maker, Smith both acquires things and produces pieces that make their way into other people’s collections. Perhaps, therefore, it is the concept of worth that may only be seen through absence.

P. Roch Smith was born and raised on Vancouver Island and currently lives and maintains a studio in Toronto. Working primarily within the realm of sculpture, Smith also generates installations, paintings, and drawings as part of his artistic output. Smith received a BFA from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and an MFA from York University. He has taught classes at the University of Waterloo, ECIAD, and York University. He has been a member of loop Gallery since 2014, and currently manages and operates the bronze and aluminum foundry at York University.

Smith has exhibited internationally and is included in private as well as public collections in Canada and the United States. His sculptures are available through the Oeno Gallery located in Prince Edward County, ON.

For more information, visit rochsmith.com, or visit his pages on instagram (@rochsmith) and twitter (@_rochsmith).

Andrew Duff #VirtualGraffiti

By | Exhibitions | No Comments

January 6th – 28th, 2018

Opening Reception: January 13th, 2 – 5  PM

Q & A: Sunday, January 28th, 2 PM

 

 

Andrew Duff​’s current body of work is #totallyfake. In an era of “Fake News,” overtly posed images and oversharing on social media, ​Duff​ asks, “why can’t I make fake art?” #VirtualGraffiti​ explores issues of unverified storytelling, ubiquitous content creators and concepts of modern media, while playfully celebrating our willingness to believe it all. When “likes” and #hashtags trump actual content, we find ourselves overrun with celebrities of all stripes behaving badly — and unknowns becoming celebrities for the same ill-advised reasons.

Inspired by this questionable media soup, Duff​ sets the stage for his work within the established structure of Instagram: a square image framed in white with minimal text. His process then continues with spontaneous photographs from his daily life taken with a smartphone. The photographs often are blurry, have strangers walking through them, or are poorly cropped. ​Duff then loads the photos onto his computer to draw and paint on them using Sketchbook Pro software and “natural” brushes. The goal being to digitally create real world graffiti that looks either plausible or is clearly fake.

The third part of ​#VirtualGraffiti​ is the written story. ​Duff​ takes on a character closely resembling himself, but with the courage and conviction of an actual graffiti artist. His short form “Fake News Fiction,” like historical fiction, is storytelling that skates close enough to reality, referencing actual people and places to make it believable. Lastly, to enhance the gallery experience, Duff​ has created 12 audio tracks for each of the exhibited ​#VirtualGraffiti pieces. These audio works incorporate royalty free sound files and ​Duff​’s own voice to create an unusual audio tour.

Andrew Duff​ is an artist, designer and educator based in Toronto. A graduate of both OCAD and NSCAD, he has sustained an active art practice and freelance design business since 1997. Duff​ became a member of Loop in 2017 and this exhibition marks his first with the gallery.

For more information, please visit andrewduff.ca or visit him on Instagram (@andrewduff).

Loop Members and Guests Lighten Up

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

A celebratory exhibition including small works by John Abrams, Jackson Abrams, Mark Adair, Gilles Arsenault, Yael Brotman, Gareth Bate, Catherine Beaudette,Diana Birkenheier, David Brown, Andrew Cripps, Carolyn Dinsmore, Andrew Duff, Maria Gabankova, Sarah Gibeault, Alexandra Greer, Colwyn Griffith, Libby Hague, Linda Heffernan, David Holt, Nikolette Jakovac, Vladyana Krykorka, Kyungmin Kate Lee, Jane Lowbeer, Ingrid Mida, Richard Mongiat, Patrick Moore, Mary Catherine Newcomb, Ruth Pak Regis, Ava Roth, Rochelle Rubenstein, Richard Sewell, Lanny Shereck, Roch Smith, MJ Steenberg, Suffield, Adrienne Trent, Connie Van Rijn, Christine Walker,  and Marian Wihak.