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Rochelle Rubinstein MY ONLY DRINK

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March 25  –  April 16,  2017

Reception: March 26,  2 – 5 PM

The first words got polluted 

Like river water in the morning 

Flowing with the dirt 

Of blurbs and the front pages. 

My only drink is meaning from the deep brain, 

What the birds and the grass and the stones drink. 

Let everything flow 

Up to the four elements, 

Up to water and earth and fire and air. 

—Seamus Heaney, “The First Words,” from the Romanian of Marin Sorescu

 

Rochelle Rubinstein’s exhibition, My Only Drink, consists of four works: Blood, Grass, Water, Wood.

The first two were originally part of a 24-panel installation, called Book of Job, which included hand-painted text and images of soldiers, birds, madonnas and horses. She printed, painted and carved red stripes over ten of the Job panels, and they became Blood. This piece is a celebration of womanhood in the context of present-day misogyny. It also connects to Rubinstein’s involvement in Blood, Milk and Tears, a collective of Muslim and Jewish women working with the subjects of menstruation, breastfeeding and mourning practices.

She transformed the remaining 14 panels into Grass, an aerial view of lush, green land. This piece emerges out of her advocacy work to protect natural grass fields and playgrounds from being replaced with toxic artificial turf.

Water consists of three layers. The first was a miscellaneous collection of block prints including bees, keening Irish women, and Rubinstein’s family in a refugee camp in Italy. Then she covered everything with the Hebrew text of the Orphan’s Kaddish, a mourning prayer. The final layer is an explosion of drops, representing tears, milk, and blood, as well as our precious Ontario aquifers that are being depleted by greedy corporations.

Last is Wood. As is her method, Rubinstein had every intention of adding layers and textures to the striped grid, but something kept stopping her. Finally, she realized there was already a completeness and an expression of solidarity in its simple lines.

—Alisha Kaplan

Mark Adair

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March 25 – April 15, 2017

Reception: March 26 – 3 – 5 PM

 

The two artists in the current Loop exhibition work in a similar way; not content to leave well enough alone, they work and re-work their pieces time and time again, even to the extent that they exhibit pieces as evolving iterations, unbothered by notions of a thing being ‘done’ or ‘undone’. This process is analogous to our cultural habit of telling stories, re-working them, then re-telling them, thus reviewing and renewing our myths and cultural narratives to provide our lives with hope and meaning.  Both are keenly aware that truth and narrative can be deadly adversaries.

Adairs pieces are often years in the making. He chooses diverse materials, methods and styles to make projects intended to engage the viewer with both the practice of production and the image or thing itself. As he leaves one project and moves on to the next there is often a steep learning curve and the labour intensive works are always exercises in redemption.

The piece Glass House Doors (2017, 63″ x 80″) began life in 2007 as a large charcoal drawing of the Tree of Knowledge. The doors invoke memories of stained glass but Adair has replaced the painted glass with hand cut lead patterning and the design of the steel support frame was suggested by the studying of necropolis street plans.

The carved wooden Head for a Fountain (2017, 14″ x 14″) and the small figure carved from elk antler are both meditations on the enigmatic Green Man figure, so brilliantly described by Russell Hoban in his 1980 futuristic, dystopian novel Riddley Walker. Head for a Fountain will be used in an installation collaboration with Patti Muratori at Rubinstein‘s Bela farm project.

Included in Adair‘s show is Catherine Daigle’s ( 2005, 40″x28″) backlit When Daddy Comes Home All The Fun Stops. Daigle died in 2006 but she would be grimly satisfied to know that her work is still relevant.

loop elsewhere MARCH EDITION

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detail from Libby Hague:  Habitat West, woodcut, objects.

TANYA CUNNINGTON

Tanya’s exhibition Paint continues until March 18th at Lee Contemporary Art in Orillia.

TARA COOPER

Tara Cooper and Terry O’Neill’s public art proposal Tall Tales of Mill Street was accepted as part of the series of outdoor artworks that will be installed along Kitchener Waterloo’s new light rail transit system.

Here’s a link to a CBC article: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/ion-lrt-stop-art-displays-1.3982236.

LIBBY HAGUE

Fabrications, the 4 person exhibition curated by Liz Wylie for the Kelowna Art Gallery continues. It also includes a wonderful sculpture installation by Yael Brotman until April 16 www.kelownaartgallery.com

The catalogue is published by ABC Books Canada http://www.abcartbookscanada.com/ with essays by  Liz Wylie and Diana Sherlock.

The International Print Exhibition: Canada and Japan. Curated by Liz Ingram and April Dean, it was first shown in Kyoto continues until March 25th. Also features Yael Brotman.
University of Alberta Museums

University of Alberta
continues until March 25th.

www.museums.ualberta.ca

And in Buffalo New York on view in the UB Anderson Gallery is Claire Ashley: Loathsome Beauty Loaded Body, an exhibition on view until April 2nd, including work from the permanent collection which includes a piece from Libby.
https://ubartgalleries.buffalo.edu/exhibitions/claire-ashley/

ESTER PUGLIESE

Ester has been invited to participate as a contributing artist in the MacLaren Art Centre’s Benefactor Programme, which enables supporters of the MacLaren to take home original artworks for a one-year loan. Ester’s work will be on display in the McLaren’s Carnegie Room from March 8 through 22 alongside 150 artworks generously loaned by practicing artists from across the province. The culminating event on March 22nd, the Art Exchange Evening, gives MacLaren Benefactors the opportunity to select a work of art for the next year. For more information visit the MacLaren Art Centre website.

Ester’s work has recently joined the roster of artists at Partial Gallery, an online art rental & sales service that brings Toronto artwork to homes, businesses, and design projects.

Also, Ester’s exhibition, Measured Calm, at Loop Gallery from January 28 – February 19, 2017 was featured in the following articles and features:

ELIZAVETA MIRONOVA, ‘Elizabeth Babyn and Ester Pugliese at Loop’, ARTORONTO.CA, February 12, 2017

“Pugliese’s paintings take the viewer into a tranquil pleasure state…Orange, red, and purple hues are erupting in the background then covered with drawing to form something between a flower and a firework. It’s electrifying but the longer you look at it, the happier and more peaceful your mind becomes.” – Elizaveta Mironova

‘The flowery, fragility of life – Ester Pugliese,’ www.artistsinspireartists.com, February 12, 2017

‘Ester Pugliese,’ image feature, www.create-magazine.com, February 8, 2017

‘Ester Pugliese: Moderate to strong northwest winds will persist throughout the weekend,’
image feature, www.eatsleepdraw.com, February 2, 2017

AARON D’ANDREA, ‘Davenport Artist Ester Pugliese Creates Collection for Valentine’s
Day,’ What’s On, Art Entertainment, Bloor West Villager, February 1, 2017

ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

Jewish and Muslim women artists envision a Toronto where cultures consciously collide, differences do not divide, creativity and community-building thrive. Facilitated by noted printmaker, painter, fabric and book artist Rochelle Rubinstein, a diverse group of women with backgrounds in visual arts, textiles, creative writing, music, photography and more come together to create a collaborative installation informed by a process of shared study of foundational Muslim and Jewish texts and deep reflection on the relationship between gender, embodiment, creativity and identity in both communities. Women’s experiences of menstruation, breastfeeding and mourning in their traditions are central to the creation of Blood, Milk and Tears

February 23 — May 24, 2017
Fentster @ Makom, 402 College Street  MAP

Opening Event:  Wednesday, March 8th,  7 – 9 PM | FREE

FENTSTER curator, Evelyn Tauben, writes about the exhibition in light of the recent mosque attack in Quebec City. Click here to read.

Join in for the opening on International Women’s Day, Wednesday, March 8, 7 to 9 PM and meet the women who created Blood, Milk and Tears, featuring vocalist Aviva Chernick and poet Sheniz Janmohamed sharing a new collaboration – two women exploring their relationship to their spiritual and creative practices through movement, sound and ritual.

 

Yael Brotman Time. Story. Tree

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February 25th  – March 19th, 2017

Reception: March 4th,  3 – 6 PM

Yael Brotman presents a new installation of work that contemplates raw material, process and universal stories that infuse our constructions and artifacts with poetry and truth.

In this exhibition, Brotman brings together various stages of creating, from the textural rubbings of bark of ancient trees on Haida Gwaii, to notation, documentation, translation from drawing to silkscreen, and transformation into three-dimensional structures.

In summer 2016, Brotman participated in a residency on Haida Gwaii, sponsored by Parks Canada and the Haida Gwaii Museum. She was struck by the legends she heard and read about Foamwoman and about eagles, ravens and turtles. There were marked parallels to the use of animals and birds in Western European tales; and the iconography of Foamwoman was remarkably similar to the multi-breasted Diana of Ephesus.

Brotman’s process is simplicity magnified into complexity. Basically she uses scissors and tape. Her drawings also embody the simplest of approaches—direct rubbings. But there is a point of departure into contemporary technology, like the GPS used to find the culturally modified trees deep in the Haida forest, the use of the silkscreen printmaking process, and the use of Mylar as the substrate. In this way Brotman’smaterial and process meld time and tales.

Yael Brotman lives and works in Toronto. She has exhibited nationally at public galleries and artist-run centres, and internationally at museums, private galleries and university galleries. She has been awarded grants and attended artist residencies in numerous countries including China, Australia, Ireland, Scotland, and Haida Gwaii. Brotman has recently been chosen as an RCA elect, to be inducted in May 2017. She is a Lecturer at the University of Toronto Scarborough and is president of the board of CARFAC Ontario.

Kim Stanford You knocked my teeth out

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February 25th – March 19th, 2017

Reception:  March 4th, 3 – 6 PM

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Kim Stanford.

In the domestic realm, performance can feel like everything for those tasked with manufacturing and maintaining a cohesive, comfortable, and happy home and family.  We play the part through careful self censorship, sharing our meticulously constructed narratives over unedited truths.  But what happens when it all starts to fall apart?

In You knocked my teeth outStanford explores the weight of keeping a family together amid dysfunction.  Frustrated by the idyllic imperative of decorating porn, Stanford creates collage and sculpture which lay bare the psychic interiors of those impossibly tasked with the domestic fantasy. The emotional strain seeps through. Something is not quite right in the pieces’ appearance even as they suggest objects that make up the spaces in which we play out our lives.  Created to unsettle rather than placate, the pieces on display in You knocked my teeth out illustrate the psychological milieu of home and all those who inhabit it.

Stanford studied visual art at The Toronto School of Art (TSA) and OCADU, as well as critical social theory in her graduate degree at the University of Toronto.  Using common, often domestic items, she constructs absurd assemblages in order to open a conversation about the universal dialectic between the taken-for-granted and a search for meaning.

Rewind with Loop’s Jenn Law

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If you missed Jenn Law’s last exhibition at Loop titled Extant, here’s a rewind look with a behind-the-scenes Q&A.

By Tara Cooper

1. What’s your elevator pitch for your last show?

In Extant, I consider the legacies of three authors who requested that their unfinished works be burned upon their deaths, yet whose writings were ultimately spared. Through the creation of imagined artifacts on the brink of destruction, I reflect on that which has been irrevocably lost over the course of time.

2. What was your strategy for the install at Loop? Were there any challenges?

I find installing work a bit stressful usually – mostly because I dread the tediousness of all the measuring and levelling, etc. So this time I asked artist and woodworker extraordinaire, Leah Ataide, to help install my show and it was the easiest, most stress-free installation experience ever. I think I actually enjoyed it for once! The biggest challenge was the 3 plinth mounted plexi-frames. Superframe custom-designed and built the double-sided frames to allow my 3 Dickinson lithographic works to be viewed from both sides. The frames were mounted on the plinths with screws that had to be fastened with wing nuts from the inside of the plinth. This required that we lay the plinth on its side with the frame tentatively screwed in, and while Leah supported the frame, I crawled inside the plinths with a mini flashlight to secure the wingnuts. A little claustrophobic, but it all came together in the end!

3. How do you spend your time when you’re not working in the studio?

I spend a lot of time reading, but the line between research and pleasure is always blurred. When I’m not making art, I’m generally writing about it; a productive compliment to my material practice, which allows me to explore and work through ideas in a slightly different way (I am happiest when I am doing both!). I have young kids, so I do my best to balance work and deadlines with time spent with my family – it keeps me grounded, focused, and grateful for what I do. Travel is always a welcome chance to recharge and seek inspiration, and as a family we love to visit museums, book stores, botanical gardens, and nature reserves both locally and further afield. When I need to de-stress, a long walk in the ravine always does the trick – or singing with my girls at the top of our lungs in the car, our own version of “carpool karaoke”!

4. What artist living or dead would you most like to have dinner with? What would you order? What question would you ask him/her?

That’s a challenging question, as there are countless artists across hundreds of years whose brains I’d like to pick! But one of the first artists to spring to mind is Sol LeWitt. I have long been enamoured with LeWitt’s work, particularly his artist’s books and wall drawings, and his embrace of seriality, collaboration, and rule-driven repetitive gestures speak profoundly to me as a print-based artist. Last year I had the privilege of visiting LeWitt’s largest scribble drawing at the Albright Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo. It was his last commissioned work and took 8 weeks, 16 artists, and nearly 2,000 pencil leads to fill the three walls surrounding the Gallery’s central staircase with 2,200 square feet of carefully prescribed scribbles. It is one of the most beautiful works I have ever seen. But LeWitt was also known for his humility and munificence and regularly traded work with both emerging and established artists. It is this generosity of spirit and interest in the exchange of work and ideas that would make LeWitt the ideal dinner guest. I would invite my closest artist friends to join us for dinner at my home, and we would drink wine and collectively make a feast of Italian food inspired by LeWitt’s years living in Spoleto, Italy. I would ask him about his time there, the influence of Italian wall painting traditions on his practice, and his favourite pieces from his own vast collection of artworks. After dinner, we would sip sweet vermouth and I would pass out graphite pencils, inviting everyone to scribble on the walls…

5. What’s next in terms of your studio practice?

I am presently working on two artist books, based on two of the series exhibited in this exhibition. The first is a book of poems created from Kafka’s Blue Octavo Notebooks (six pages of which were framed as individual pages for this show). The second book is a reflection on the ancient Library of Alexandria, from which the postcard pieces in the exhibition emerged. I am very excited to be creating works in book form and hope to jump back full-steam into my work and research in the coming months!

FEBRUARY EDITION

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image detail: Libby Hague, Tokyo baby, 15.5 x 20.5 in. woodcut, collage, dotted dots (acrylic)

 

YAEL BROTMAN AND LIBBY HAGUE

Yael and Libby have work in Fabrications at the Kelowna Art Gallery. The opening is February 3rd, 7 – 9pm with a Panel Discussion on February 4th from 2 – 4pm. The exhibition runs until April 16, 2017.
Includes an installation by Yael, Mountains Dance Like Rams, and also work by artists Gisele Amantea and Laura Vickerson. Curated by Liz Wylie.

Kelowna Art Gallery
1315 Water Street
www.kelownaartgallery.com

Yael and Libby are also featured in the International Print Exhibition: Canada and Japan, 2016 at the University of Alberta Museums. Curated by Liz Ingram and April Dean. [Previously exhibited at Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art and at Tokushima Museum of Modern Art] University of Alberta Museums Galleries at Enterprise Square1023 Jasper Avenue

University of Alberta, Edmonton AB
Feb.16 – March 25, 2017
Opening: February 26th

www.museums.ualberta.ca

and you can see Yael’s work in In House 2017,
a group exhibition of new works in collaboration with Paperhouse Studio.
Opens on February 24th with an Artists’ Panel Discussion at 6 p.m.
Works will be on view February 24 and 25th at Critical Distance Centre for Curators (CDCC), Suite 302
Artscape Youngplace
180 Shaw St., Suite 102, Toronto ON

J. LYNN CAMPBELL

Lynn is one of the artist featured in the Drawing 2017, John B. Aird Gallery’s 18th Annual Juried Exhibition. Showcasing drawing by contemporary Canadian artists. Exhibition runs February 7th until March 3rd. Opening Reception is February 9th, 6 – 8pm.

John Aird Gallery
Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street (at Wellesley), Toronto ON
Gallery Hours: Monday to Friday 10am to 6pm.
www.airdgallery.org

DAVID HOLT

David will be leading a summer studio art workshop for practicing artists in Orvieto, Italy, focusing on art and religion. The workshop will run from June 18 to July 15, 2017 and will take advantage of the area’s rich historical tradition of religious material culture from its Etruscan origins onward. Graduate level university credit available. More information and to find out how to participate visit http://www.icscanada.edu/art_in_orvieto/workshops

 

Elizabeth Babyn Plastopia

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January 28 – February 19, 2017

Reception: January 28, 3- 6 p.m.

 

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Elizabeth Babyn

In response to a world where oil-based materials have infiltrated so much of our consumer society, Babyn’s new installation entitled, Plastopia, represents a dystopian reality, composed of excessive amounts of plastic refuse, mirrored-Mylar and mutant-plastic creatures. Her Tsunami-Waterfall harnesses the seductive power of consumption with coloured strobing lights and reams of plastic wrap knotted onto a 16’ x 25’ chicken wire-structure, that offers beauty and enticement until the more sinister components of the “garbage” from which it is made, reveal themselves.

Along with a sci-fi video that features monstrous-plastic creatures, there are long lengths of mirrored-Mylar on both the floor and ceiling accompanying the sculptural pieces within Plastopia. The video reveals a surreal assemblage of random illogical sequences that appear both confusing and devoid of a comprehensive storyline. Babyn’s film and installation objects, symbolically repeat themselves as they obscenely fill the space through the use of mirror fragmentation; “never able to get rid of” the multiplying effects of overabundance and hyper-consumption. Considering that 315 billion tons of plastic become permanent fixtures within our oceans and waterways; this post-apocalyptic world reflects not only her own consumption excesses, but ones that also plague many of us within society today.

Babyn received her BFA with Honours in Drawing and Painting from the Ontario College of Art and Design University in 2005. She recently completed her MFA in 2016 at the University of Saskatchewan in sculpture and installation. She has been a Loop Gallery Member in Toronto since 2003. She has exhibited nationally and internationally. Her works can be found in public and private collections in both Canada and Europe.

For more information, visit www.elizabethbabyn.ca.

Ester Pugliese Measured Calm

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January 28 – February 19, 2017

Reception:  January 28, 3 – 6 p.m.

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist, Ester Pugliese.

Channeling diverse influences ranging from endangered species and cut flower arrangements, to children’s amusements and Italian folk music, Pugliese‘s new mixed media paintings capture the fleeting quality of life. By suffusing abstracted swathes of colour with carefully drawn details and a coral reef aesthetic, the works ask viewers to untangle dense layers and find relationships in seemingly disparate imagery. Geometric shapes resembling building blocks threaten to swallow carefully rendered details of plants, suggesting their likely demise through the agency of human progress. However, rather than obliterating the natural living things, these geometric shapes appear to be replicating themselves – learning how to grow alongside the natural world.

Measured Calm explores the relationship between the enjoyment evoked by the sensuous depiction of a subject and a conflicting moral message, a concept inspired by the still life, or “vanitas”, paintings of the Netherlands in the 16th and 17th centuries. This is akin to the artist’s breathless lust when she enters a flower shop and imagines composing an arrangement drawn from the exquisite living things contained within. With such an assortment of blooms – common, rare and possibly endangered – she must contain her desire to have them all. It seems that in today’s world, when we scrutinize our base, often materialistic, urges we inevitably confront our morals.

Ester Pugliese is a Toronto-based artist. She graduated from York University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Specialized Honours) in Visual Arts Studio. She spent a year studying abroad in Leeds, UK and has exhibited extensively in Ontario as well as in Leeds, UK. Pugliese has been the recipient of numerous awards and scholarships, and her work can be found in private and public collections in North America and Europe, including the Donovan Collection.

For more information, visit www.esterpugliese.com.

loop elsewhere JANUARY EDITION

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image details: Rochelle Rubinstein, Tara Cooper

 

TARA COOPER

Tara’s exhibition God Loves Brigus II opened January 6th at the Alberta Printmakers Gallery.
During a 3-week stay at Landfall Trust in Brigus, Newfoundland (http://www.landfalltrust.org/), Tara researched the history of the area and took note of the weather. She watched an iceberg slowly dissolve in the bay, learned about Captain Bob Bartlett, who was an arctic explorer that once brought a polar bear home to Brigus and met Ray, the caretaker of Landfall, who told her a story about his grandfather – a whaler that lost his life in an explosion at sea. Made in collaboration with Terry O’Neill, God Love Brigus compiles these experiences into a floating raft that mixes sculpture, print, sound and video.
Show runs until February 18th, 2017
Alberta Printmakers Gallery
4025 4th Street SE Calgary AB

ROCHELLE RUBINSTEIN

CYCLiC opens January 13th at Open Studio and runs until February 11, 2017.
Join Rochelle at the Opening Reception Friday January 13th from 6:30 – 8:30 PM.
Open Studio
George Gilmour Members’ Gallery
401 Richmond Street West
Suite 104
Toronto, ON
416 504 8238

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