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Jane Lowbeer Deluge

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March 9 – 31, 2019

Opening Reception: Sunday, March 10, 2 – 5 PM

Artist’s Talk: Sunday, March 24, 2 – 4 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce Deluge, a collection of new work by Jane LowBeer.

Lowbeer explains her process as follows: Rarely do I go to the studio with a plan. Instead I show up to work without a specific intention and intuit what to do. A sense of impending doom weighs on me now and carries into the studio. The specter of climate change and the extreme vulnerability of the planet have been affecting my life. Day-to-day feels unpredictable; living in the country, it’s hard to know what shoes to wear when fields shift from snow to ice, and back to earth in 24 hours. I read and hear constantly about current climate disaster and dark future scenarios. My workspace is overflowing with bits and pieces of prints I have saved – fragments of my art dating back 40 years. In recycling this work I find my response to catastrophe; sorting through this flotsam, some remnants suggested tears. As a result the collages I made showed an abundance of vertical lines, which led me to musings of rain – lots of rain. Rain and catastrophe evoke the flood, one of the oldest recurring myths of civilization.

 

Martha Eleen Adaptation

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March 9 – 31, 2019

Opening Reception: Sunday March 10, 2 – 5 PM

Artist’s talk: Sunday March 24, 2 – 4 PM

 

 

Martha Eleen’s Adaptation is a process-based series of paintings that attempts to make visible the experiential qualities of space that you can’t see, such as temperature, meaning, memory, time, emotion. 

These paintings map the connection between the artist’s physical and inner landscapes. By imposing a restriction on observed perspective, the compositions must adapt to shape space using other aspects of visual language: sensation, movement, weather, patterns/rhythms, the changing circumstances of daily life, mood and emotion, vibration.

About the Artist

Adaptation is Eleen’s third body of work investigating the relationship and interdependency of space and place. In The Meaning of Things, 2015, observations of a cardboard box were used to represent a place without socio-political context (unlike buildings and rooms). In Watershed, 2017, the jumping off point was the exterior spaces from the box compositions, but this time there was no subject matter: space without place or meaning.

Martha Eleen is interested in human geography and the relationship between culture and landscape. Her paintings have received critical attention in the form of curatorial essays, reviews and publication such as the The Globe and Mail and Descant magazine.  Eleen’s work has been exhibited in public galleries in Canada, U.S.A, Mexico and Japan, and is represented in permanent collections including the Art Gallery of Ontario. She is an Honours graduate of Emily Carr College of Art, Vancouver. Eleen lives in Toronto where she teaches painting and drawing at Toronto School of Art and is represented by Loop Gallery.

Neeko Paluzzi The Goldberg Variations, and Other Works

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February 13 – Mach 3, 2019

Opening Reception : Saturday, February 16, 2-5 PM


Neeko Paluzzi (b. 1988) is an emerging, Ottawa-based artist and educator whose practice focuses on conceptual installation. His images blend the possibilities of traditional, analogue darkroom processes with contemporary photographic techniques, such as 3D scanning and printing. He is a graduate of the Photographic Arts and Production program at the School of the Photographic Arts: Ottawa (2017) and holds a Masters of Arts from the University of Ottawa (2013).     

The Goldberg Variations continues Paluzzi’s ongoing interest in merging photographic and musical tones. In this iteration of his tonal series, Paluzzi focuses on the iconic recordings of Bach’s ​Aria with Diverse Variations (commonly known as ​The Goldberg Variations) by Glenn Gould in 1955 and  1981. These seminal recordings bookended Gould’s professional life, with the former being his international debut and the latter being the last recording before his death a year later. The 1955 recording, in particular, reinvigorated an interest in Bach’s ​Goldberg Variations​ because of Gould’s fast-paced tempi and clinical finger movements, bringing the baroque composer into the 20th century. As an older and more reserved performer, Gould’s second recording, in 1981, was noticeably different with a slower tempo overall. 

In Paluzzi’s ​The Goldberg Variations, there are thirty-two photographs, each visualizing a single aria or variation from Bach’s score. The top portion of the photograph visualizes Gould’s 1955 recording, whereas the bottom portrays the 1981 recording. In order to match the tonal range of a particular piece of music, Paluzzi uses darkroom equipment as a musical instrument, operating the aperture of the enlarger lens, contrast filters, and the timer to make sound into light.

The Goldberg Variations is on display at Loop Gallery, along with select other works by Paluzzi, from February 14 – March 3, 2019.

Lois Schklar Prototypes

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Feb 6-10, 2019

Reception: February 9, 3-5 PM

 

Lois Schklar’s art practice consists of an ongoing series of drawing installations utilizing found and bought urban objects as “mark making” tools. She manipulates these diverse and often disparate materials, aware of the aesthetic relationship they have with one another and, by implication, the physical and psychological space they occupy. Schklar is interested in process, a sense of play, being in the moment and a non-linear approach to documentation. She examines the ephemeral qualities of light and shadow and plays with the idea of memories as associative responses. 

Prototypes is an exploration of sound, narrative, light and audience interaction in relation to Schklar’s previous work. It is made possible through the assistance of a Canada Council Explore and Create Grant and the support of the Ontario Arts Council.

For this project, Schklar asked the following questions:

  • How could movement be combined with sound? 
  • Was it possible for light to activate sound?
  • What shapes could be generated through lighting? 
  • How would light affect the way the work is seen? How could the illusion be maintained or emphasized? 
  • What type of linear materials could be utilized?
  • How could objects be animated through touch?
  • Would the work survive audience interaction?
  • What were the possibilities?
  • Schklar hired Make Good Studio (Geoff Watson, Geoff Palin and Joseph Murray) to actualize technical answers to her questions and create interactive possibilities. Together they developed two prototypes, Waterfall and Pull Me Gently, that are workable models for future work. Additionally, Schklar developed low tech sound installations that the audience could play. Bio

    Lois Schklar’s work has been shown in exhibitions throughout Canada and the United States. Her burlap sculptures are in the Bronfman Collection, Claridge Investments, Idea Exchange Art Gallery and The Key Corporation.

    Schklar has received grants from the Toronto Arts Council, Canada Council and Ontario Arts Council. In 2018 she received an Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant for her exhibition ReMemory and a Canada Council Explore and Create Grant for Prototypes. Recently (2019), she was awarded an OAC Exhibition Assistance Grant for Prototypes at Loop Gallery. Lois is a member of Red Head Gallery at 401 Richmond in Toronto.

    Special gratitude to Make Good Studio, Leah Ataide, woodworker, Peter Legris, photographer, and Noah Gano for his poem “oh this”.

 

 

Sylvia Lee + Jeff Goodman Studio Horizon

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Sylvia Lee + Jeff Goodman Studio present ‘Horizon’, a glass installation at Loop Gallery for Design Week in Toronto

Sylvia Lee, Executive and Creative Director of Jeff Goodman Studio, is pleased to present ‘Horizon’ for DesignTO 2019. Building on the multi-year success of the studio’s past projects for Toronto’s Design Week, Lee will return to traditional glass blowing with the Horizon exhibition and fill the window at Loop gallery with floor-to-ceiling blown glass pieces.

“Last year we really pushed the technical envelope with our origami-inspired glass installation. This year with Horizon, we use traditional blown glass as a vehicle to inject unapologetic, intense, beautiful colour into a space. This is about passionate colour and how we can live with glass as an architectural element in our everyday life.”

On the concept, Lee says “I imagined looking through the keyhole of a door, and seeing the horizon at sunset. I wanted to translate the intensity of colour in that micro experience into a macro expression. Horizon at Loop gallery is that macro expression.”

The installation is adapted from the Cascade product popular with clients at Jeff Goodman Studio.  It’s a customizable configuration of blown glass pieces that is engineered to hang from the ceiling or be secured from the floor to ceiling. 

Lee explains further. “Our Cascade product is a completely customizable tool we often present to clients, architects and designers who need architectural screens, chandeliers or installations for an interior. It’s a series of custom blown pieces engineered precisely to hang in suspended animation. They can control the colour, shape, layering, density and configuration. It’s a great tool for them to express their vision for a project and bring glass into the space.”

Jeff Goodman Studio’s large-scale work complements a robust offering of glass vessels on display in galleries all over North America. The studio’s work is sought after by art collectors and has been recognized by the prestigious Corning Museum of Glass in New York as a “…feat of engineering and experimentation…”

Richard Sewell Neopolitan Camouflage

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with guest artist Carmelo Arnoldin

January 12 – February 3, 2019

Opening Reception:  January 12, 2 – 5 PM

 

See Mr. Arnoldin’s “The Trash Brothers”

His wonderful beer-can sourced, hand cut-edged woven tapestry, a graphically composed, in black and gold, can-made double-portrait.

See Mr. Sewell’s towards-the observer 8 ½ x 11 book-like occurrences, sympathize with neopolitan-linear arrangements, be cautious near camouflage patterns, stand in proximity with locations, objects, surfaces, coloured tarpaulins & duct-tapes, extruded/cut foam-forms; sequenced: silicone and cable-tie connectors, cut/torn remnants, orange/black critter resistant-meshes…and (although hidden from view)… strong magnets which secure autobiographical objects into one story punctuated by a biscotti-cookie,  a yellow post-it pad, a large free-range egg, a Pliocene-smoothed mini stone, 2 Home Depot small bi-coloured clamps, 1 used black china marking pencil (with pull-string), 1 too-squeezed toothpaste tube, a 1940’s heirloom ice-cream scoop, and local-notations locale-spelled, laminated and locale positioned about: actual locational-words.

 

Mark Adair The Fountain Project

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January 12 – February 3, 2019

Opening Reception: January 12 2-5 PM

 


At what point does a culture surrender its will to go on? Does it ever occur that cultures, just like individuals, simply lie down and die from weariness or self contempt? Can a complex cultural aggregate simply ‘lose the thread’? And can an immoral culture thrive, breed and thrust forward vital leadership?

A couple of years ago I showed the sculpture Head for a Fountain. An intuitive response to the rise of demagogical politics, the piece started life as the carving of a demon’s head. The transitional moment (when it became an architectural detail) occurred during a visit to Rochelle Rubinstein’s Bela farm, when Patti Muratori suggested that the head belonged to a fountain. In that moment, water being the theme of our visit to Bela, the Muratori/Adair collaboration The Fountain Project was born.

In this Loop show, there are two iterations of The Fountain Project: one from wood, the other concrete and slate. Together, they trace the evolution of the fountain from gallery object to functioning garden water supply. Within the context of the show, they exist parallel to the sixteen drawings from the Death Drinks series of charcoal miniatures.

 

Mary Catherine Newcomb A . . .

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December 8 – 30,  2018

Opening Reception: December 8, 2018

 Mary Catherine Newcomb’s  A… exposes the plight of a significant but silent and ignored group of people, while inviting the viewer to ponder the roles, consequences and function of exclusion in larger contexts.

Rage, humiliation, shame, self doubt and a loss of self respect are only a few of the destructive emotions that exclusion evokes. Wresting with these feelings is a messy, painful, confusing, undignified and interminable hell. The lucky, like the heroes of myth, emerge transformed, while the unlucky or inexperienced flounder.

For Newcomb, this isn’t an abstract idea. The artist has a stigmatized and misrepresented health issue, and has been unable to return to work because providing a safe environment for her conflicts with the rights of others.

Referencing personal experience and her body, Newcomb draws the viewer into a realm that acknowledges a direct animal response to exclusion, and alludes to the mythic demand for sacrifice. In her use of historical imagery, she asks whether this situation is merely a modern iteration of an inescapable human drama.

In The Scarlet Letter, heroine Hester Prynne is ostracized for sexual transgression. She is ordered to wear her shame in the form of a scarlet ‘A’ (for adulteress) sewn onto her clothing. In contrast to her defiant, embellished A, Newcomb’s A… stands for allergic and asthmatic (and artist) . . .

As physical and social environments rapidly change, various people, species and landscapes cannot survive. Mary Catherine is proud to be, in her own small way, going down on the same ship as other tested individuals and species. A is for absent.

About the Artist

Mary Catherine Newcomb is a sculptor, installation artist and teacher. She studied biological science at the University of Toronto and the University of Guelph before committing to a career as an artist. She holds a general degree from the University of Toronto, a BFA from the University of Waterloo and an MFA from York University. She has exhibited work across Canada and in Germany, and is the recipient of many grants and awards. She is a member of the Nethermind collective, and has taught at various institutions in Southern Ontario — most recently for the Ontario College system.

The artist would like to thank Two Smiths and Robert McNair, who donated time and resources to help raise awareness of an ignored issue. She also wants to acknowledge the unrecognized bravery of individuals who have responded with legal challenges to the transportation industry’s carelessness and apparent determination to put health and lives of the vulnerable at risk.

David Holt Paintings

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December 8 – 30,  2018

Opening Reception: December 8, 2 – 5 PM

Loop is proud to announce Orvieto Paintings, an exhibition of recent work by David Holt.

The paintings in this exhibition were completed over the past two years, and are part of a larger ongoing series of works involving history, architecture and religion. Most grew out of work from two summers in Orvieto, Italy. Some are based directly on sculpture from the Orvieto Duomo façade, while others reference a range of Early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval sources. Many are variations on emblematic (rather than narrative) depictions of Christian saints. Other paintings freely interpret the shapes found in religious architecture. The compositional grids of most of the paintings allow for a playful visual interplay of motifs. 

The artist wishes to thank the Art in Orvieto program of the Institute for Christian Studies in Toronto and Gordon College in Orvieto for their collegial support. 

About the Artist

Holt is a painter whose works are in private collections in the USA and Canada. He has been a recipient of a painting grant from the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation and an artist’s residency at the Ragdale Foundation. A professor of art for many years at Marymount College (later part of Fordham University) in Tarrytown, New York, he has lived and worked in Toronto since 2005, teaching art at Upper Canada College. 

For more information, visit: https://sites.google.com/site/davidholtpaintings/

Elizabeth D’Agostino Other Collisions

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November 10 – December 2, 2018

Opening Reception: November 10,  2 – 5 PM

Elizabeth D’Agostino’s latest exhibition at Loop Gallery, examines the precarious balance of habitat loss and human interconnection.

During the summer of 2017, D’Agostino with her family ventured on a road trip to Sointula, BC, a small coastal fishing village on Malcolm Island accessible only by ferry. While in Sointula she took part in the Sointula Art Shed Residency, gathering research material and producing a number of drawings and collages of local flora and fauna. Through the exploration of the management of living systems in nature and their interactions with humans, this body of work illustrates animal nature and the complexities of the changing landscape, emphasizing how various paths have been interrupted.

Other Collisions is a series of multi-layered etchings, digital prints and sculptures on Gampi tissue, a resilient Japanese paper. The use of Gampi tissue provides a surface that is both visceral and transformative, and transfers the etched line sinuously through both the transparent and translucent layers.

Each image oscillates between the real and fabricated, creating new arrangements influenced by their formal characteristics and habitats. This body of work employs strategies related to biodiversity and references images from plants, animals and microorganisms that inhabit the Canadian landscape. 

Fictitious environments and constructed stories merge these elements, creating a dialogue between the natural and human-made world. When installed, the prints and print-based objects produce a catalogue of re-purposed environments and fictional categories of nature within a narrative.

About the Artist

Elizabeth D’Agostino holds a BFA from the University of Windsor and a MFA from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and internationally including Iziko: Museum of Cape Town, South Africa, Manhattan Graphics Center, New York, and The Print Center, Philadelphia. In addition, D’Agostino’s prints can also be found in many private and public collections including the University of Changchun Jilin, China; Anchor Graphics at Columbia College Chicago, Illinois, Department of Foreign Affairs Canada, and Ernst and Young, Canada. 

D’Agostino is the recipient of many awards and including the Hexagon Special Projects Fellowship at Open Studio, Toronto. In 2015, she was selected by the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada to create the custom carpet design for the Ontario Room in the newly renovated Canada House, London, England.

Elizabeth D’Agostino lives and works in Toronto and is a member of Open Studio Fine Art Printmaking Centre and Loop Gallery.