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January 2019

Sylvia Lee + Jeff Goodman Studio Horizon

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Sylvia Lee + Jeff Goodman Studio present ‘Horizon’, a glass installation at Loop Gallery for Design Week in Toronto

Sylvia Lee, Executive and Creative Director of Jeff Goodman Studio, is pleased to present ‘Horizon’ for DesignTO 2019. Building on the multi-year success of the studio’s past projects for Toronto’s Design Week, Lee will return to traditional glass blowing with the Horizon exhibition and fill the window at Loop gallery with floor-to-ceiling blown glass pieces.

“Last year we really pushed the technical envelope with our origami-inspired glass installation. This year with Horizon, we use traditional blown glass as a vehicle to inject unapologetic, intense, beautiful colour into a space. This is about passionate colour and how we can live with glass as an architectural element in our everyday life.”

On the concept, Lee says “I imagined looking through the keyhole of a door, and seeing the horizon at sunset. I wanted to translate the intensity of colour in that micro experience into a macro expression. Horizon at Loop gallery is that macro expression.”

The installation is adapted from the Cascade product popular with clients at Jeff Goodman Studio.  It’s a customizable configuration of blown glass pieces that is engineered to hang from the ceiling or be secured from the floor to ceiling. 

Lee explains further. “Our Cascade product is a completely customizable tool we often present to clients, architects and designers who need architectural screens, chandeliers or installations for an interior. It’s a series of custom blown pieces engineered precisely to hang in suspended animation. They can control the colour, shape, layering, density and configuration. It’s a great tool for them to express their vision for a project and bring glass into the space.”

Jeff Goodman Studio’s large-scale work complements a robust offering of glass vessels on display in galleries all over North America. The studio’s work is sought after by art collectors and has been recognized by the prestigious Corning Museum of Glass in New York as a “…feat of engineering and experimentation…”

Richard Sewell Neopolitan Camouflage

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with guest artist Carmelo Arnoldin

January 12 – February 3, 2019

Opening Reception:  January 12, 2 – 5 PM

 

See Mr. Arnoldin’s “The Trash Brothers”

His wonderful beer-can sourced, hand cut-edged woven tapestry, a graphically composed, in black and gold, can-made double-portrait.

See Mr. Sewell’s towards-the observer 8 ½ x 11 book-like occurrences, sympathize with neopolitan-linear arrangements, be cautious near camouflage patterns, stand in proximity with locations, objects, surfaces, coloured tarpaulins & duct-tapes, extruded/cut foam-forms; sequenced: silicone and cable-tie connectors, cut/torn remnants, orange/black critter resistant-meshes…and (although hidden from view)… strong magnets which secure autobiographical objects into one story punctuated by a biscotti-cookie,  a yellow post-it pad, a large free-range egg, a Pliocene-smoothed mini stone, 2 Home Depot small bi-coloured clamps, 1 used black china marking pencil (with pull-string), 1 too-squeezed toothpaste tube, a 1940’s heirloom ice-cream scoop, and local-notations locale-spelled, laminated and locale positioned about: actual locational-words.

 

Mark Adair The Fountain Project

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January 12 – February 3, 2019

Opening Reception: January 12 2-5 PM

 


At what point does a culture surrender its will to go on? Does it ever occur that cultures, just like individuals, simply lie down and die from weariness or self contempt? Can a complex cultural aggregate simply ‘lose the thread’? And can an immoral culture thrive, breed and thrust forward vital leadership?

A couple of years ago I showed the sculpture Head for a Fountain. An intuitive response to the rise of demagogical politics, the piece started life as the carving of a demon’s head. The transitional moment (when it became an architectural detail) occurred during a visit to Rochelle Rubinstein’s Bela farm, when Patti Muratori suggested that the head belonged to a fountain. In that moment, water being the theme of our visit to Bela, the Muratori/Adair collaboration The Fountain Project was born.

In this Loop show, there are two iterations of The Fountain Project: one from wood, the other concrete and slate. Together, they trace the evolution of the fountain from gallery object to functioning garden water supply. Within the context of the show, they exist parallel to the sixteen drawings from the Death Drinks series of charcoal miniatures.