kipjones second nature facsimile

By June 18, 2018Exhibitions

June 23 – July 15, 2018

Opening Reception: June 23, 2 – 5 PM

 

 “Doppelgangers as reflections of the strong discordance of modernity as it speaks to our involvement with nature”

 -Hillel Schwartz: The culture of the copy:Striking likenesses, unreasonable facsimiles.New York. Zone Books, 1996

 

The works in second nature facsimile seek to address the troubling tensions between humans’ vision of nature and the natural in the quest to create a contemporary civilization. They are playful acts of research into the notions and process of the cast object as a facsimile or copy of an ideal. 

Through the use of a broad range of materials, the various elements that constitute each individual form create an inter-connected discourse between the objects. These works are statements that tell an integral story of the interaction with the natural. This relationship is examined through familiar icons such as cast iron house frameworks, which refer to the planet as a place where we live. 

The works in second natural facsimile are intended as acts of engagement that create descriptive narratives, pushing the limits of multiples through the use of process and materiality. 

About the Artist

kipjones is an active and experienced public artist, sculptor and instructor living in Toronto. Over the past two decades, he has created public and studio-based works addressing various issues related to the critical and conceptual discourse of contemporary three-dimensionality. More specifically, he believes sculpture to be an open genre that speaks to space as a societal dimension, gesture as an action or event, and time as a response or reflection.

In his artistic research, kipjones addresses this complexity of space via immersive, site-specific installations, public art and object-making. Solo and co-designed permanent public art projects are installed at the Calgary International Airport, Moncton City Hall, Kelowna Public Library, King’s Square in Charlottetown, PEI, and the Markham Museum. 

 

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