Monthly Archives

May 2018

John Ide What Paper Remembers

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May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 26, 2 – 5 PM

 

 

Loop Gallery is proud to present What Paper Remembers, a collection of new work by John Ide. In his own words:

“Earlier this year I was going through some old drawings and wondered what would happen if I erased some of them and reworked what was left. I’ve been erasing ever since, and redrawing based on what the paper remembers.

Erasing is part of my drawing process, inspired in large part by how much the printmaking paper I use refuses to “forget.” This random refusing to forget forces me to respond and I find the push-pull creatively stimulating.” 

What Paper Remembers continues Ide’s exploration of the connections between memory, history and the artistic process. Please join us on Sunday, May 27th from 2-5 p.m., as we celebrate the exhibition’s opening. 

John Ide is a longstanding loop member who has exhibited widely in Toronto and beyond. The preoccupation with personal and collective memory has been an ongoing theme in his work across disparate media. After years of installation-based work, Ide returned to drawing in 2006 and has continued to evolve his practice in the years since. 

Adrienne Trent The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature

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May 26 – June 17, 2018

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 27, 2 – 5  PM

 

 Popular culture revolves around the idea that actors, sets, spoken lines and special effects are not a constructed reality, shot frame-by-frame to enable the viewer to get lost in the plot, but rather reality itself. This creates a ‘false consciousness,’ based on ersatz representations which television and film makers intend for viewers. I began to pursue the idea of exploring this false, fabricated reality as the basis for an exhibition, particularly as it’s a subject I have close, first-hand knowledge of: I’ve worked in art departments in the Toronto film industry for the last 20 years.

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature includes a projected video loop consisting of a series of 3 minute videos. I filmed them while rustling trees and observing lighting and special effects on a successful, 4-season (so far) American TV series. At the beginning of Season 3, the executive producers informed me that some viewers had called to express a particular disturbance: during interior scenes, the trees which I’d placed outside the windows were not “moving in the breeze” and therefore “didn’t look real.” To solve this thorny problem, I was asked to shake the trees manually by tying filament to them and gently rustling them, during the brief takes in which a window with an exterior view was in the shot.

 

The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature consists of footage of myself in the act of shaking the trees; I also caught on video a helium “moon” whose artificial light shone down onto a constructed waterfall, and a cozy living room, whose crackling fireplace flames up instantly thanks to a quick propane torch.

 

In addition to the projection, the administrative desk has been subjected to a process referred to in film as “breakdown.” This indicates the artificial aging of props, sets and costumes on a film set to emulate the time period in which the story takes place. Though I’ve worked on projects that span millennia, for the objects in this show I’ll limit history to the last ten years, a period not yet obsolete and dingy. The act of re-inscribing recent history on an object speaks to the central role this ‘false consciousness’ plays in the creative process. 

 

My film work has enabled me to experience a wide variety of projects and budgets. I’ve been hired onto multimillion dollar projects such as Pompeii, as well as many small independent films, and also union productions for notable directors such as Denis Villeneuve, Denys Arcand, Deepa Mehta, Bruce MacDonald, Don McKellar and zombie guru George Romero.