Mark Adair

By March 20, 2017Exhibitions

March 25 – April 15, 2017

Reception: March 26 – 3 – 5 PM

 

The two artists in the current Loop exhibition work in a similar way; not content to leave well enough alone, they work and re-work their pieces time and time again, even to the extent that they exhibit pieces as evolving iterations, unbothered by notions of a thing being ‘done’ or ‘undone’. This process is analogous to our cultural habit of telling stories, re-working them, then re-telling them, thus reviewing and renewing our myths and cultural narratives to provide our lives with hope and meaning.  Both are keenly aware that truth and narrative can be deadly adversaries.

Adairs pieces are often years in the making. He chooses diverse materials, methods and styles to make projects intended to engage the viewer with both the practice of production and the image or thing itself. As he leaves one project and moves on to the next there is often a steep learning curve and the labour intensive works are always exercises in redemption.

The piece Glass House Doors (2017, 63″ x 80″) began life in 2007 as a large charcoal drawing of the Tree of Knowledge. The doors invoke memories of stained glass but Adair has replaced the painted glass with hand cut lead patterning and the design of the steel support frame was suggested by the studying of necropolis street plans.

The carved wooden Head for a Fountain (2017, 14″ x 14″) and the small figure carved from elk antler are both meditations on the enigmatic Green Man figure, so brilliantly described by Russell Hoban in his 1980 futuristic, dystopian novel Riddley Walker. Head for a Fountain will be used in an installation collaboration with Patti Muratori at Rubinstein‘s Bela farm project.

Included in Adair‘s show is Catherine Daigle’s ( 2005, 40″x28″) backlit When Daddy Comes Home All The Fun Stops. Daigle died in 2006 but she would be grimly satisfied to know that her work is still relevant.

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