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February 2017

Yael Brotman Time. Story. Tree

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February 25th  – March 19th, 2017

Reception: March 4th,  3 – 6 PM

Yael Brotman presents a new installation of work that contemplates raw material, process and universal stories that infuse our constructions and artifacts with poetry and truth.

In this exhibition, Brotman brings together various stages of creating, from the textural rubbings of bark of ancient trees on Haida Gwaii, to notation, documentation, translation from drawing to silkscreen, and transformation into three-dimensional structures.

In summer 2016, Brotman participated in a residency on Haida Gwaii, sponsored by Parks Canada and the Haida Gwaii Museum. She was struck by the legends she heard and read about Foamwoman and about eagles, ravens and turtles. There were marked parallels to the use of animals and birds in Western European tales; and the iconography of Foamwoman was remarkably similar to the multi-breasted Diana of Ephesus.

Brotman’s process is simplicity magnified into complexity. Basically she uses scissors and tape. Her drawings also embody the simplest of approaches—direct rubbings. But there is a point of departure into contemporary technology, like the GPS used to find the culturally modified trees deep in the Haida forest, the use of the silkscreen printmaking process, and the use of Mylar as the substrate. In this way Brotman’smaterial and process meld time and tales.

Yael Brotman lives and works in Toronto. She has exhibited nationally at public galleries and artist-run centres, and internationally at museums, private galleries and university galleries. She has been awarded grants and attended artist residencies in numerous countries including China, Australia, Ireland, Scotland, and Haida Gwaii. Brotman has recently been chosen as an RCA elect, to be inducted in May 2017. She is a Lecturer at the University of Toronto Scarborough and is president of the board of CARFAC Ontario.

Kim Stanford You knocked my teeth out

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February 25th – March 19th, 2017

Reception:  March 4th, 3 – 6 PM

 

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Kim Stanford.

In the domestic realm, performance can feel like everything for those tasked with manufacturing and maintaining a cohesive, comfortable, and happy home and family.  We play the part through careful self censorship, sharing our meticulously constructed narratives over unedited truths.  But what happens when it all starts to fall apart?

In You knocked my teeth outStanford explores the weight of keeping a family together amid dysfunction.  Frustrated by the idyllic imperative of decorating porn, Stanford creates collage and sculpture which lay bare the psychic interiors of those impossibly tasked with the domestic fantasy. The emotional strain seeps through. Something is not quite right in the pieces’ appearance even as they suggest objects that make up the spaces in which we play out our lives.  Created to unsettle rather than placate, the pieces on display in You knocked my teeth out illustrate the psychological milieu of home and all those who inhabit it.

Stanford studied visual art at The Toronto School of Art (TSA) and OCADU, as well as critical social theory in her graduate degree at the University of Toronto.  Using common, often domestic items, she constructs absurd assemblages in order to open a conversation about the universal dialectic between the taken-for-granted and a search for meaning.

Rewind with Loop’s Jenn Law

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If you missed Jenn Law’s last exhibition at Loop titled Extant, here’s a rewind look with a behind-the-scenes Q&A.

By Tara Cooper

1. What’s your elevator pitch for your last show?

In Extant, I consider the legacies of three authors who requested that their unfinished works be burned upon their deaths, yet whose writings were ultimately spared. Through the creation of imagined artifacts on the brink of destruction, I reflect on that which has been irrevocably lost over the course of time.

2. What was your strategy for the install at Loop? Were there any challenges?

I find installing work a bit stressful usually – mostly because I dread the tediousness of all the measuring and levelling, etc. So this time I asked artist and woodworker extraordinaire, Leah Ataide, to help install my show and it was the easiest, most stress-free installation experience ever. I think I actually enjoyed it for once! The biggest challenge was the 3 plinth mounted plexi-frames. Superframe custom-designed and built the double-sided frames to allow my 3 Dickinson lithographic works to be viewed from both sides. The frames were mounted on the plinths with screws that had to be fastened with wing nuts from the inside of the plinth. This required that we lay the plinth on its side with the frame tentatively screwed in, and while Leah supported the frame, I crawled inside the plinths with a mini flashlight to secure the wingnuts. A little claustrophobic, but it all came together in the end!

3. How do you spend your time when you’re not working in the studio?

I spend a lot of time reading, but the line between research and pleasure is always blurred. When I’m not making art, I’m generally writing about it; a productive compliment to my material practice, which allows me to explore and work through ideas in a slightly different way (I am happiest when I am doing both!). I have young kids, so I do my best to balance work and deadlines with time spent with my family – it keeps me grounded, focused, and grateful for what I do. Travel is always a welcome chance to recharge and seek inspiration, and as a family we love to visit museums, book stores, botanical gardens, and nature reserves both locally and further afield. When I need to de-stress, a long walk in the ravine always does the trick – or singing with my girls at the top of our lungs in the car, our own version of “carpool karaoke”!

4. What artist living or dead would you most like to have dinner with? What would you order? What question would you ask him/her?

That’s a challenging question, as there are countless artists across hundreds of years whose brains I’d like to pick! But one of the first artists to spring to mind is Sol LeWitt. I have long been enamoured with LeWitt’s work, particularly his artist’s books and wall drawings, and his embrace of seriality, collaboration, and rule-driven repetitive gestures speak profoundly to me as a print-based artist. Last year I had the privilege of visiting LeWitt’s largest scribble drawing at the Albright Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo. It was his last commissioned work and took 8 weeks, 16 artists, and nearly 2,000 pencil leads to fill the three walls surrounding the Gallery’s central staircase with 2,200 square feet of carefully prescribed scribbles. It is one of the most beautiful works I have ever seen. But LeWitt was also known for his humility and munificence and regularly traded work with both emerging and established artists. It is this generosity of spirit and interest in the exchange of work and ideas that would make LeWitt the ideal dinner guest. I would invite my closest artist friends to join us for dinner at my home, and we would drink wine and collectively make a feast of Italian food inspired by LeWitt’s years living in Spoleto, Italy. I would ask him about his time there, the influence of Italian wall painting traditions on his practice, and his favourite pieces from his own vast collection of artworks. After dinner, we would sip sweet vermouth and I would pass out graphite pencils, inviting everyone to scribble on the walls…

5. What’s next in terms of your studio practice?

I am presently working on two artist books, based on two of the series exhibited in this exhibition. The first is a book of poems created from Kafka’s Blue Octavo Notebooks (six pages of which were framed as individual pages for this show). The second book is a reflection on the ancient Library of Alexandria, from which the postcard pieces in the exhibition emerged. I am very excited to be creating works in book form and hope to jump back full-steam into my work and research in the coming months!

FEBRUARY EDITION

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image detail: Libby Hague, Tokyo baby, 15.5 x 20.5 in. woodcut, collage, dotted dots (acrylic)

 

YAEL BROTMAN AND LIBBY HAGUE

Yael and Libby have work in Fabrications at the Kelowna Art Gallery. The opening is February 3rd, 7 – 9pm with a Panel Discussion on February 4th from 2 – 4pm. The exhibition runs until April 16, 2017.
Includes an installation by Yael, Mountains Dance Like Rams, and also work by artists Gisele Amantea and Laura Vickerson. Curated by Liz Wylie.

Kelowna Art Gallery
1315 Water Street
www.kelownaartgallery.com

Yael and Libby are also featured in the International Print Exhibition: Canada and Japan, 2016 at the University of Alberta Museums. Curated by Liz Ingram and April Dean. [Previously exhibited at Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art and at Tokushima Museum of Modern Art] University of Alberta Museums Galleries at Enterprise Square1023 Jasper Avenue

University of Alberta, Edmonton AB
Feb.16 – March 25, 2017
Opening: February 26th

www.museums.ualberta.ca

and you can see Yael’s work in In House 2017,
a group exhibition of new works in collaboration with Paperhouse Studio.
Opens on February 24th with an Artists’ Panel Discussion at 6 p.m.
Works will be on view February 24 and 25th at Critical Distance Centre for Curators (CDCC), Suite 302
Artscape Youngplace
180 Shaw St., Suite 102, Toronto ON

J. LYNN CAMPBELL

Lynn is one of the artist featured in the Drawing 2017, John B. Aird Gallery’s 18th Annual Juried Exhibition. Showcasing drawing by contemporary Canadian artists. Exhibition runs February 7th until March 3rd. Opening Reception is February 9th, 6 – 8pm.

John Aird Gallery
Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street (at Wellesley), Toronto ON
Gallery Hours: Monday to Friday 10am to 6pm.
www.airdgallery.org

DAVID HOLT

David will be leading a summer studio art workshop for practicing artists in Orvieto, Italy, focusing on art and religion. The workshop will run from June 18 to July 15, 2017 and will take advantage of the area’s rich historical tradition of religious material culture from its Etruscan origins onward. Graduate level university credit available. More information and to find out how to participate visit http://www.icscanada.edu/art_in_orvieto/workshops