Monthly Archives

December 2016

Suzanne Nacha Interior Geometry

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December 31, 2016 – January 22, 2017

Reception: Saturday, January 7, 2017

Inspired by industrial landscapes, Nacha’s animation works present seamlessly looped, staged scenarios. Viewed in ceramic boxes, these animated vignettes appear as windows onto other worlds. Their moving geometries play with the viewer’s perception – successfully conveying mood and offering a unique visual experience. While animations take their inspiration from the landscapes of industry, screen prints and oval format paintings draw on her background in the geological sciences. Conflating the standard pictorial formats of landscape and portrait—anthropomorphism of geological strata and references to historical portraiture cleverly combine to create absurd and ominous narratives. Further enriched by her use of complex color, knowledge of structural geology and studied shadow play, these paintings and prints put forward an existential narrative—one that illuminates our ‘earth → man → machine’ trajectory and relationship to geologic time.

Suzanne Nacha is an artist working in painting, sculpture, installation and video. Her work is imbued with a unique visual language enriched by her experiences mapping the far-reaches of Canada, creating geologic maps that span the earth’s continents and the study of structural geology. She has exhibited her artwork in Canada, the United States and Europe and is represented in public and private collections, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, the National Bank of Canada, The Donovan Collection and the Robert McLaughlin Gallery. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, she holds degrees in both Fine Art and Geology. She has taught in the Fine Art departments of OCAD, Sheridan/UTM and York University, and for the past fifteen years has worked in the geological sciences mapping geographies of fortune and need.

For more information, visit www.suzannenacha.com.

Libby Hague Pattern Recognition

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December 31, 2016 – January  22, 2017

Reception: Saturday January 7, 2-5 PM

Playdate: Sunday, January 15, 1-4 PM

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce a new exhibition by member artist Libby Hague. 

I see Loop Gallery as an experimental space. This exhibition has two experimental installations—one visual and the other audio visual.

How much is too much? You begin with one object, then add another. At a certain point, our minds rebel at having to hold it all together. Nevertheless you add one more thing and wondrously, a release comes, everything fuses and becomes one variegated pattern with a quiet visual buzz on which that one new addition sits, a resting spot in a noisy world.

To explore this edge of excess, I am relying on the safety net of structure; it is not a precise grid, but an intuitively felt one that I hope viewers will also sense—something to make me feel brave and viewers reassured—something to connect us to a subtly comprehensible world that allows me to build complexity.

In a spirit of free invention, I’ve also begun a series of experiments with the potential of some of the structural components to make sounds. These sounds are much simpler than those made by traditional instruments, but the objects are very curious and less daunting. Everything will flow from the viewer’s decision to reach out and touch something. When explored by careful people, it should be at least interesting. If anyone is actually musical, I hope something more will emerge.

Libby Hague, RCA, (BFA Honours, Concordia University, (SGWU) Montreal)

Thematically, Libby Hague’s work examines humane and complex social relationships in a precarious and interconnected world. Her concerns, curiosity and love of invention have led her to a hybrid practice of printmaking, installation and animation.

Her recent solo exhibitions include the Idea Exchange, Cambridge; Centre Clark, Montreal; the Art Gallery of Ontario; YYZ artist’s outlet, Toronto; and the Art Gallery of Mississauga. Recent group exhibitions include Habitat: Our World; our chance, Harbourfront; Build…build better, Zion Schoolhouse and All that glows, AGNS. She lives and works in Toronto, Canada.

For more information, please visit www.libbyhague.com or contact Kelly McKenzie, Gallery Manager.

loop elsewhere December Edition

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loop_elsewhere

banner_tryptic2 details of images: Maria Gabankova, Sandra Gregson, Jane Lowbeer and Tanya Cunnington

TANYA CUNNINGTON

Tanya is the owner and director of Lee Contemporary Art, a gallery in Orillia, an hour and a half north of Toronto. The annual Christmas Exhibition opens December 1 – 24.   If Only I’d Received Art For Christmas II  features work from Tanya as well as local artists Bewabon Shilling, Alex Richardson, Samantha Vessios, and her mom Annie Kmyta Cunnington.  All artwork is priced at $100 or less, and the opening night reception is Thursday Dec 1 from 7-9 pm.

Lee Contemporary Art
5 Peter Street South, Upper Level
Orillia, ON, L3V 5A8
705.331.3145
www.leecontemporaryart.ca

MARIA GABANKOVA

Maria invites you to an exhibition from the series New World Order, Book of Revelation and Residents/Dissidents
at  THE CONTEXT (program with Lorna Dueck) at the CBC Building (downtown Toronto)
enter at 205 Wellington St. (at John St.), walk straight ahead, it is the second door on your right.
Tuesday, Dec 6, 2016, 10 am to 4 pm
Monday, Dec 12, 2016,  10 am to 4 pm
Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016, 10 am to 8 pm  – artist wil be present 4 pm to 8 pm
For any inquiries please call: 416 535 8063

SANDRA GREGSON

Sandra’s work, in collaboration with Gary Spearin, continues until January 8, 2017.  Sandra is exhibiting a 4 metre tall tree made of terra cotta plant pots at 12 TREES: GOOD FOR THE EARTH curated by David Buckland at the Gardiner Museum in Toronto. http://www.gardinermuseum.on.ca/exhibitions/upcoming/12-trees-2016

JANE LOWBEER

Jane’s work in Local Colour, a group show at the Art Gallery of Peterborough continues until Jan 8th, 2017.

http://agp.on.ca

ESTER PUGLIESE

Ester has work in the exhibition Glimpse at Station Gallery in Whitby, on view December 3, 2016 – January 29, 2016.
Juried by Kelly McCray, Steven Schwartz and Shelagh Stewart, the exhibition will catch sight of the fast paced world we live in. From a glance to a peek and a peep, Glimpse is sure to delight.
All are welcome to attend the opening reception on Thursday, December 8, beginning at 7 pm. Parking spaces at the gallery are limited, additional parking is available at Iroquois Park or the Whitby GO Station—all in walking distance to the gallery.

Gallery Hours:
Monday – Friday 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Thursdays  10:00 am – 9:00 pm
Saturday & Sunday  noon – 4:00 pm
Station Gallery
1450 Henry Street, Whitby, Ontario L1N 0A8
905-668-4185
art@whitbystationgallery.com
http://www.whitbystationgallery.com

also ESTER is participating in the group show Keepers, at Forest City Gallery in London, Ontario, running Friday, December 2, 2016 to Tuesday, December 13, 2016This is Forest City Gallery’s biggest fundraiser of the year, featuring works priced between $20 and $500. Attend the opening reception on December 2nd from 6 – 10 PM to get first picks of the show.

Confirmed artists to date : Tyler Armstrong . Megan Arnold . Simon Bentley . David Bobier . Derek Boswell . Parker Branch . Jeremy Brunnel . Lucas Cabral . Heather Carey . Emily Clark . Lynette de Montreuil . Jason Deary . Colin Muir Dorward . Cory Downing . Tyler Durbano . Liza Eurich . Kim Ewin-Goebel . Duncan Ferguson . Jake Freeman . Adam Giroux . Sky Glabush . Jennifer Hamilton . Antony Hare . Charlotte Hegele . Patrick Howlett . Tiffany Hufta . Kelly Jazvac . Bryan Jesney . James Kirkpatrick . Neil Klassen . Mack Ludlow . Owen Marshall . Conan Masterson . Zoë Mpeletzikas . Sarah Munro . Christine Negus . Kim Neudorf . Victoria Parker . Jenna Faye Powell . Ester Pugliese . Leslie Putnam . Angie Quick . Krista Reimer . Karalyn Reuben . Adam Revington . Ben Robinson .Rima Sater . Claire Scherzinger . Ruth Skinner . Jill Smith . Gabriella Solti . Mark Stebbins . Helen Thompson . Luke van H . Charles Vincent . Abby Vincent . Andrew Wyton . Thea Yabut . Billy Bert YoungGallery Hours:
Wednesday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Thursday: 12:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Friday & Saturday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Forest City Gallery
258 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6B 2H7
(519) 434-5875
info@forestcitygallery.com
http://www.forestcitygallery.com/

a visit with Ava Roth

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sneak-peek-logo

 

 

 

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What process bridges the different mediums you work in?

Until I turned my attention to encaustic several years ago, all of my work was connected by a single endeavor: to use traditionally female, and often impermanent, materials in new and unconventional ways. Whether embroidering, making cake art, carving jewelry or working with textiles, I have been motivated by a connection to and conversation with other women, across different times and cultures. My turning to encaustic represented a conscious change, a 180 degree turn away from the materials that women have always had their hands on, and towards a world of blow-torches, toxicity, larger scale works, and lack of control. Interestingly enough, I have spent the last year coming full circle. My current body work is a collection of ‘sewn encaustic paintings’; I’m using an awl to push tiny threads into the wax, evoking stitched fabric, or needlework.

 

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How does having your dogs in the studio effect your work and your practice?

My dogs love to sleep on the warm floor of my studio, and always keep me company while I’m working. Occasionally this is challenging. My Great Dane has knocked over several paintings, and my bulldog likes to sleep underfoot while I am handling a blowtorch. (His white fur is currently dappled with indigo wax.) Despite these inconveniences, working with my dogs means more to me than just having some company in my studio. Having Thunder and Panda with me while I make art makes me feel like my creativity is intimately connected to my life as a whole. This holistic connection with my life is essential to my work.

 

 

 

 

 

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Besides your dogs, what else keeps you company in the studio?

I always listen to music when I’m working. Good music helps me turn off the left-side of my brain, and encourages me to rely on non-verbal, non-logical information to guide my process.

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What contemporary artists have influenced your work?

I tend to be most influenced by artists who are focused on a small and intimate project, those who work in traditionally female materials, and/or anyone engaged in creating temporary art. For example, there is an American wood-worker by the name of Josh Vogel, who crafts the most beautiful wooden spoons imaginable, transforming this ordinary utensil into lovingly rendered sculptures that are still absolutely functional. Toronto-based artist Laura Carwardine is another example – her gigantic cross-stich installation at Patria restaurant, is deeply inspiring to me. I’m often influenced by artists whose names we don’t know – ranging from the shibori textiles made by women in Japan, to beadwork on Inuit coats, to ancient Jewish wedding contracts, called ketubahs, which were traditionally painted and hung in homes.

 

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How do you know when a work is done?

I hate this response, it sounds so trite, but I just do! I have rarely, in all my life of making things, not known when a piece of work was done.

 

 

Thanks Ava for the visit!

to see more of Ava’s work check out: http://www.avaroth.ca

 

 

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